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Does Including Students With Special Needs in Grade 3 Classes Affect the Achievement of Students Without Special Needs?Author(s): Henk Demeris; Ruth Childs; Anne Jordan
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on the inclusion of special needs students in a Grade 3 classroom:

"Some parents and educators worry that inclusion – that is, placing students with special needs in the regular classroom – will negatively affect the academic achievement of the students without special needs, for example, by creating more demands on the teacher’s attention and for other resources. This study uses data from the 1997-1998 Ontario provincial assessment to investigate the relationship between the number of students with special needs in almost 2,000 grade-3 classes and the achievement scores of their peers without special needs."

This document has been viewed 922 times.
Equity, Social Justice, and the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): Carl E. James (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 1,350 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Pamela Rose Toulouse
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,067 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Dr. John R. Kirby and Peter N. Bowers
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

This document has been viewed 1,233 times.
Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Philip Burge; Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz; Nancy Hutchinson; Hugh Box (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 992 times.
Teachers Identify Their Coping Strategies for the Perceived Stresses of Inclusive ClassroomsAuthor(s): Darlene Brackenreed (2011)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms can be a stressful experience for Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigated the coping strategies used by teachers in Ontario to manage this stress.

This document has been viewed 931 times.
Teachers report the factors that cause them stress when teaching inclusive classroomsAuthor(s): Darlene Brackenreed (2008)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms has been a stressful experience for many Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigates teacher perceptions of the “stressors” (specific causes of stress) that result from the inclusion of special needs students in the regular classroom.

This document has been viewed 1,180 times.
Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): Ruth McQuirter Scott
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

This document has been viewed 1,025 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Catherine Cornford
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,088 times.