KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

Assessing Text Difficulty for StudentsAuthor(s): Murphy, S. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores three key kinds of knowledge that may help teachers arrive at more informed and defensible judgments about the likelihood of a text’s readability for children:
1. knowledge about the reader’s characteristics and the reading task
2. knowledge about the surface features of a text
3.knowledge about the deeper features of texts and the modalities represented in the text.

This document has been viewed 1,150 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

This document has been viewed 1,043 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 811 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

This document has been viewed 912 times.