KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

Assessing Students' Learning SkillsAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Miller, T., Shulha, L. (2006)
The Ontario education system requires teachers to assess students’ academic and non-academic achievements (learning skills) separately. These skills include: works independently, teamwork, organization, work habits, and initiative. This research surveyed Grade 9 mathematics teachers in Ontario on their assessment practices relating to learning skills.

This document has been viewed 1,127 times.
Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

This document has been viewed 2,691 times.
Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Lataille-Démoré, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

This document has been viewed 1,462 times.
Does Including Students With Special Needs in Grade 3 Classes Affect the Achievement of Students Without Special Needs?Author(s): Demeris, H., Childs, R., Jordan, A. (2008)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on the inclusion of special needs students in a Grade 3 classroom:

"Some parents and educators worry that inclusion – that is, placing students with special needs in the regular classroom – will negatively affect the academic achievement of the students without special needs, for example, by creating more demands on the teacher’s attention and for other resources. This study uses data from the 1997-1998 Ontario provincial assessment to investigate the relationship between the number of students with special needs in almost 2,000 grade-3 classes and the achievement scores of their peers without special needs."

This document has been viewed 970 times.
Experiences of Immigrant Students in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study investigated how immigrant students perceive the experience the study of French as a Second Official Language (FSOL) in Canada’s English- dominant elementary and secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 660 times.
Exploring the Use of Literature Across Elementary CurriculumAuthor(s): Pantaleo, S. (2002)
This study investigated the use of literature in elementary classrooms across subject areas. The researcher explored teacher and teacher-librarians’ use of different genres of literature including: realistic fiction (stories about everyday life), non-fiction, fantasy (science fiction, quest stories), poetry, traditional literature (myths, legends, folktales), and historical fiction. The researcher investigated the overall use of these genres by teachers and teacher-librarians and also the use of Canadian literature within each genre.

This document has been viewed 1,130 times.
How Teachers Can Use ResearchAuthor(s): Levin, B. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on how teachers can use research to inform their practice:

"Education research has an important contribution to make to practice, but teachers face two big challenges
in getting the most value from research evidence. First, how can teachers learn about the findings and
implications of high quality research? Second, how do teachers turn the rather general findings of research
into practices that work in very different schools and classrooms?"



This document has been viewed 1,002 times.
Inclusion in French classroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K.
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

This document has been viewed 704 times.
Ontario Teachers’ Assessment Practices in MathematicsAuthor(s): Suurtamm, C., Koch, M., Arden, A. (2010)
This study uses questionnaire data and case studies to examine the assessment practices of mathematics teachers in Ontario and to understand how new assessment practices are enacted and supported. Many mathematics teachers in Ontario are using innovative assessment practices that go beyond traditional testing and support student learning in a variety of ways. They report on the important role of professional development and curriculum resources as well collaboration with colleagues in supporting new practices.

This document has been viewed 1,256 times.
Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Burge, P., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Hutchinson, N. and Box, H. (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 1,045 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

This document has been viewed 1,184 times.
Student Self-handicapping in Mathematics ClassroomsAuthor(s): Ferguson, J. M., Dorman, J. P. (2003)
This study investigated the relationship between classroom environment and secondary students self-handicapping behaviour. The researchers define self-handicapping as a “proactive, avoidance behaviour... designed to manipulate other people’s perceptions of performance outcomes so that the self-handicapping student appears worthy to other people in the school”. Examples of self-handicapping behaviour include deliberately not trying in class, fooling around the night before an examination, and putting off studying until the last minute.

This document has been viewed 705 times.
Supporting Aboriginal Educators in Pre-service Training Programs and in their Careers as TeachersAuthor(s): Kitchen, J., Cherubini, L., Trudeau, L., Hodson, J. (2010)
This research explored the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers in both mainstream and native teacher education programs in Ontario. These early-career teachers from the Mohawk, Anishinabe and Métis groups reflected upon the challenges they encountered during their teacher preparation courses and first years of teaching. Specifically, this research identified the need to design current teacher education programs that value the individual and cultural identities of Aboriginal teacher candidates.

This document has been viewed 1,787 times.
Supporting teachers who engage in district-wide, school-based programs: The experiences of PrincipalsAuthor(s): Gallagher, T. and Grierson, A. (2011)
This study examined the experiences of school administrators whose schools were the hosting sites of a district-wide professional learning initiative in one Ontario school board. Intended to assist with the implementation of evidence- based literacy and numeracy practices, four teachers from across the board were chosen to host demonstration classrooms where other teachers could visit and observe research-based instructional practices in action.

This document has been viewed 688 times.
Teachers Identify Their Coping Strategies for the Perceived Stresses of Inclusive ClassroomsAuthor(s): Brackenreed, D. (2011)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms can be a stressful experience for Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigated the coping strategies used by teachers in Ontario to manage this stress.

This document has been viewed 972 times.
Teachers report the factors that cause them stress when teaching inclusive classroomsAuthor(s): Brackenreed, D. (2008)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms has been a stressful experience for many Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigates teacher perceptions of the “stressors” (specific causes of stress) that result from the inclusion of special needs students in the regular classroom.

This document has been viewed 1,284 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

This document has been viewed 1,087 times.
Teaching diverse books to a diverse student populationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

This document has been viewed 853 times.
Teaching Mathematics For Social JusticeAuthor(s): Esmonde, I., & Caswell, B. (2010)
This study reports on a set of collaborative inquiry projects aimed at exploring teaching mathematics for social justice in one urban elementary school in Toronto.

This document has been viewed 962 times.
Technology in the Mathematics ClassroomAuthor(s): Bruce, C.D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of interactive whiteboards:

"Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are a relatively new learning tool. While some early studies suggest that they may only be a “slick presentation tool” used to enhance teacher-directed lessons, others have identified a greater potential. Research on use in mathematics classrooms suggests that when we combine thoughtful professional learning with implementation, we enable teachers to maximize the use of IWBs to enhance student learning through multi-modal representations and inquiry approaches."

This document has been viewed 2,149 times.
The Inclusion of English Language Learners in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study examined French as a Second Language teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about the inclusion of English Language Learner (ELL) students in French as an Official Second Language (FSOL) classes.

This document has been viewed 768 times.
The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Development of Secondary School YouthAuthor(s): Hands, C. (2008)
While many Ontario schools include character development and citizenship education as part of their curriculum, these topics have traditionally been taught to students in classrooms within the boundaries of schools. This research, on the other hand, investigated a character education program in one school that involved school-community partnerships.

This document has been viewed 1,035 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Millett, P. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,230 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Cornford, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,214 times.
What ECE Teachers Think About Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood EducationAuthor(s): Wood, E., Specht, J., Willoughby, T. & Mueller, J. (2008)
This research study examined the perceptions of early childhood educators regarding integrating computer technology into pre-school classrooms. Specifically, this research focused on educators’ perceived advantages and disadvantages of such computer use and the barriers and supports that exist for pre-school educators in teaching computer technology curricula.

This document has been viewed 1,323 times.