Search Results

GSA Members' Experiences with a Structured Program to Promote Well-BeingAuthor(s): Alicia Lapointe, Claire Crooks (2017)
The Fourth R's HRP for LGBT2Q+ Youth helps bolster positive mental wellness and encourage skill development among queer, trans, and gender diverse youth. It was adapted from the Healthy Relationships Plus Program (HRPP) - an evidence-informed, small group universal prevention program for youth that promotes positive mental health and well-being, and prevents risky behaviours. The HRP for LGBT2Q+ Youth was developed in consultation with academics, educators, and youth, and consists of 17 sessions, each lasting 45 minutes.

Viewed 36 times.
Children's Development of Self-Regulation for Learning During MindUP™Author(s): Devon Trower, Lynda Hutchinson, Claire Crooks (2018)
This study explored how kindergarten children’s self-regulation for learning (SR/L) developed within a mindfulness-based social and emotional learning program (MindUP™), along with children’s demographic and teacher factors that were associated with it. Findings indicated that children’s behaviours associated with solo and social SR/L increased over the implementation of MindUP™.

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A Mindfulness-Informed Social-Emotional Learning Program in Kindergarten ClassroomsAuthor(s): Nicole Off, Claire Crooks, Karen Bax (2018)
This study explored changes in kindergarten children's behaviours following a mindfulness-informed social emotional learning program, MindUP™ children showed improvements in resiliency and behaviours such as anxiety and depression following MindUP™, but no changes in aggression and hyperactivity.

Viewed 7 times.
Effectiveness of Growth Mind-Set Interventions on Academic AchievementAuthor(s): Sisk, V. F., Burgoyne, A. P., Sun, J., Butler, J. L., & Macnamara, B. N. (2018)
It is suggested that students with growth mind-set traits exhibit greater adaptive psychological behaviours (e.g. positive response to failure), and consequently higher academic achievement. As a result some educators have implemented growth mind-set interventions to help students achieve better grades and scores on standardized tests. Given the rise in funding for and interest in mind-set interventions, it is important to comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of these programs on academic achievement, as well as the circumstances under which effectiveness is enhanced or diminished.

Viewed 10 times.
A Closer Look at: Bullying and Immigrant Youth in OntarioAuthor(s): Vitoroulis, Irene, & Georgiades, Katholiki. (2017)
Immigrant youth often experience a variety of barriers during their integration to the Canadian school system. Bullying is a problem in schools that can result in emotional, behavioural and social difficulties in youth. This research summary from the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB) takes a closer look at the role that schools and educators play in supporting positive peer relationships between immigrant and non-immigrant youth.

Viewed 37 times.
Are Positive Youth Development Interventions Effective?Author(s): Ciocanel, O., Power, K., Eriksen, A., & Gillings, K. (2017).
This research summary was developed by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB). It outlines a 2017 systematic review of the effectiveness of youth development interventions in promoting positive outcomes and reducing problem behaviours. The research finds that positive youth development interventions are a promising preventative technique for reducing harmful adolescent behaviour.

Viewed 200 times.
After-School Programs for At-Risk YouthAuthor(s): Kremer, K., Maynard, B., Polanin, J., Vaughn, M. and Sarteschi, C. (2015)
This is an updated research summary developed by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB). It outlines a systematic review and meta-analysis that attempted to determine whether after-school programs affect externalizing (problematic) behaviour and school attendance. The programs under review ranged from academically oriented to mainly extra-curricular. Implications and recommendations for after-school programs are provided.

Viewed 257 times.
Bullying Predicts Dating Violence & Poor Relationship QualityAuthor(s): Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study showed that bullying predicts dating violence and poor relationship quality in adolescent dating relationships. These results illustrate how peer and dating relationship contexts are interconnected during adolescence. Youth who display aggression and other unhealthy behaviours in one type of relationship are likely to do so in others as well....

Viewed 367 times.
Treatment of Mental Health Disorders Among Children in Child Welfare CareAuthor(s): Stewart, S., Leschie, A., den Dunnen, W., Zalmanowitz, S., Baiden, P. (2013)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

Many children and youth in the child welfare system are receiving
inadequate mental health treatment. Evidence suggests that comprehensive intervention efforts involving the child or youth, family, school, and community are required for improving behavioural functioning and placement stability.

Viewed 490 times.
Link Between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury & Suicidal BehavioursAuthor(s): Hamza, C., Stewart, S., Willoughby, T. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

NSSI and suicidal behaviours are different behaviours that often co-occur. Little attention has been given to why these behaviours are linked. Since NSSI is considered one of the most significant risk factor for suicidal behaviours, it is crucial to examine the mechanism through which this occurs. Three theories have been proposed to explain the link between NSSI and suicidal behaviours and, in this summary, an integrated model of these theories is introduced.

Viewed 240 times.
Adolescent Identity as a Buffer Against Peer Pressure & Risk BehavioursAuthor(s): Dumas, T., Ellis, W., Wolfe, D. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study explored whether youths’ level of identity exploration and commitment to identity would moderate the relationship between peer pressure and control and risk behaviours. Over 1,000 students completed self-report measures of identity exploration, identity commitment, risky behaviours, and experiences of peer-group pressure and control.


Viewed 247 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

Viewed 867 times.
Inclusion in French ClassroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K. (2008)
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

Viewed 776 times.
Student Self-handicapping in Mathematics ClassroomsAuthor(s): Ferguson, J. M., Dorman, J. P. (2003)
This study investigated the relationship between classroom environment and secondary students self-handicapping behaviour. The researchers define self-handicapping as a “proactive, avoidance behaviour... designed to manipulate other people’s perceptions of performance outcomes so that the self-handicapping student appears worthy to other people in the school”. Examples of self-handicapping behaviour include deliberately not trying in class, fooling around the night before an examination, and putting off studying until the last minute.

Viewed 771 times.
Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction and Depression Among AdolescentsAuthor(s): Goldfield, G.S., Moore, C., Henderson, K., Buchholz, A., Obeid, N. and Flament, M.F. (2010)
This study investigated eating disorder behaviour, body dissatisfaction and symptoms of depression among Canadian adolescents.

Viewed 918 times.
Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

Viewed 3,043 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hamilton, H.A., Marshall, L., Rummens, J.A., Fenta, H. & Simich, L. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

Viewed 997 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education, entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier, 1 at the moment when someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

Viewed 1,495 times.
Managing Teacher-Student Relationships: A Minimalist ApproachAuthor(s): Richmond, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on managing teacher-student relationships:

"Teachers can have two types of conversations with students in class. In the ideal situation the most potent
conversation is focused on learning, with minor support from the managing conversation. However, when
teachers experience lessons where conversation about managing dominates, the learning agenda can
disappear and poor outcomes are much more likely (Richmond, 2007)."

Viewed 1,606 times.
Bullying prevention in schools: A survey of Ontario principalsAuthor(s): Smith, D., Cousins, B., Stewart, R. (2005)
This study explored the relations among various aspects of bullying prevention programs.

Viewed 906 times.
Restorative justice in an Ontario public schoolAuthor(s): Reimer, K. (2011)
This qualitative case study explores the implementation of restorative justice in one Ontario Public School. Restorative justice
is a philosophy and process for dealing with harmful behaviour, viewing such behaviour as a violation of relationships, not
rules.

Viewed 955 times.
Assessing Students' Learning SkillsAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Miller, T., Shulha, L. (2006)
The Ontario education system requires teachers to assess students’ academic and non-academic achievements (learning skills) separately. These skills include: works independently, teamwork, organization, work habits, and initiative. This research surveyed Grade 9 mathematics teachers in Ontario on their assessment practices relating to learning skills.

Viewed 1,227 times.