Search Results

Using a Professional Learning Community to Support Multimodal LiteraciesAuthor(s): Lotherington, H., Paige, H. and Holland-Spencer, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy instruction is under pressure, being pushed towards screen-based, digitally networked environments, while simultaneously adhering to print- based reading and writing practices. Teachers are pulled in opposing directions as literacy is applied to an expanding grey area of evolving texts that do not fit comfortably within conventional school curricular expectations and assessments. How can teachers change their literacy teaching practices to incorporate integrated pedagogical approaches while still ensuring student success?

Viewed 1,014 times.
Supporting Struggling WritersAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Sadly, some students struggle in their attempts to communicate what they have learned and to interact with others through writing. This summary explores research which provides many strategies for addressing these students’ specific writing difficulties and enhancing their motivation to write.

Viewed 852 times.
Peer Feedback on Writing: An Assessment-for-Learning ToolAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. (2013)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

Viewed 765 times.
Effective Writing Instruction for Students in Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Graham, S., McKeown, D., Kiuhara, S., & Harris, K. R. (2012).
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2012 systematic review of methodologies for writing instruction with elementary students by Graham, McKeown, Kiuhara & Harris

Viewed 1,137 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

Viewed 1,201 times.
Special Education Programming: Principal’s Report on Their Leadership Role(s) in Special Education Programming and Their Professional Development NeedsAuthor(s): Zaretsky, L., Moreau, L., and Faircloth, S. (2008)
This study examined principal’s perceptions of what it means to provide leadership in special education: how they believe they demonstrate this leadership in their schools, how well they believe they are prepared to engage in these roles, and their perceived professional development needs in this area.

Viewed 919 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

Viewed 1,163 times.
Poetry: A Powerful Medium for Literacy and Technology DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hughes, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of poetry and technology:

"Traditional notions of literacy were once related more or less exclusively to competence
in reading and writing. We have expanded these notions to include usage and
comprehension skills in speaking, listening, viewing, and representing – by which we
mean communicating through a variety of media, including visual art, drama, and
multimedia performances. In this context, our definition of literacy extends to
fluency in reading and creating electronic media. In a time when the focus is on
improving literacy, what role might poetry, a genre that is often marginalized in the
English language arts classroom, play in literacy development? How can poetry be
taught in ways that engage students, so that we can tap into its literacy-enhancing
power?"

Viewed 1,286 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

Viewed 1,270 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However, the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

Viewed 1,788 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Klein, P. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics. It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

Viewed 1,443 times.
Storytelling and Story WritingAuthor(s): Campbell, T., Husek, M. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of storytelling and story writing:

"By analyzing the written and spoken words of students in a Grade 4/5
class over a period of two months, we were able to explore the connections
between oral rehearsal – including storytelling – and story writing. We found
that the use of storytelling and peer talk stimulated significantly more writing
and higher-quality writing."

Viewed 1,323 times.
Science and Literacy in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Elliott, P. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Language, both spoken and written, is central to exploring scientific phenomena, sharing and testing ideas and demonstrating understanding. Additionally, language use in the learning of science aids students’ development of literacy and associated cognitive skills. So, how can we embed the acquisition of literacy
skills in science and promote synergy between the teaching of science and literacy?"

Viewed 934 times.
Improving Student Writing: Using Feedback as a Teaching ToolAuthor(s): Peterson, S. S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

Given that teachers spend a great deal of time providing written feedback to
students, it is important that the feedback have a greater influence on students’
writing development. Verbal or written feedback can be a powerful teaching tool
if it is given while students are in the process of writing drafts.....Focusing
on individual students’ immediate writing needs, this ongoing feedback is a form
of differentiated instruction that complements the teaching of mini-lessons to
small groups or to the whole class.

The teaching tools discussed [in this summary] support all students, Grades 4 to 12."

Viewed 1,434 times.
Professional development and teacher efficacy in MathAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D., Esmonde, I., Ross, J., Dookie, L., Beatty, R. (2010)
This research investigates the effects of a focused professional development (PD) program on teacher beliefs about their efficacy in applying standards-based mathematics curriculum in Grade 6.

Viewed 1,270 times.
After-School Literacy Activities and Performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

Viewed 1,292 times.