Search Results

Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): McQuirter Scott, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

Viewed 1,345 times.
Using Video Games to Teach ScienceAuthor(s): Jaipal, K. and Figg, C. (2009)
This study explored the use of a video game in the science classroom and it’s impact on teaching and learning. More specifically, this study focused on Nano Legends, an educational video game about cell division and cancer, which was implemented by four grade 8 science teachers in 2007.

Viewed 1,083 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

Viewed 1,570 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

Viewed 1,436 times.
What ECE Teachers Think About Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood EducationAuthor(s): Wood, E., Specht, J., Willoughby, T. & Mueller, J. (2008)
This research study examined the perceptions of early childhood educators regarding integrating computer technology into pre-school classrooms. Specifically, this research focused on educators’ perceived advantages and disadvantages of such computer use and the barriers and supports that exist for pre-school educators in teaching computer technology curricula.

Viewed 1,394 times.
Video Games in the Classroom: Building Skills in Literacy and NumeracyAuthor(s): Duplàa, E., Shirmohammadi, S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As a society, we are seeing rapid and significant developments in video gaming, a field that is on its way to outdistancing the film and television industry. We are also witnessing the development and marketing of multiplayer online gaming. Yet much like the telephone at the turn of the century or television 50 years ago, video games are linked to controversy.... So, our question is, Can video games be used for learning in the classroom, particularly in the area of literacy and numeracy?"


Viewed 2,007 times.