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After-school literacy activities and performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Don A. Klinger; Ying Zheng (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

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Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): Bozena White (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

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Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for second language studentsAuthor(s): Liying Cheng; Don A. Klinger; Ying Zheng
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

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Handling Problematic Situations When Administering the EQAO AssessmentAuthor(s): Ruth Childs; Linda Umezawa (2009)
While instructions are provided to teachers on how to administer large-scale assessments, in some cases strict adherence to these instructions may prove to be problematic for teachers in their dual role as both test supervisor and teacher. This study investigated how grade 3 teachers expect to react when faced with problematic situations while administering the EQAO assessment to their own classroom students. Specifically, the researchers explored what these teachers said they would do when faced with a number of hypothetical situations, and why they would choose a certain course of action.

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How Well Aligned Are Large-Scale Assessments and Report Card Grades?Author(s): John Ross; Peter Gray (2008)
The use of standardized external assessments as an indicator of student achievement has long been a controversial issue in most educational circles. This study compared students’ Education and Quality Assessment Office (EQAO) scores and their report card grades to determine whether students receive comparable ratings on the two assessments. Specifically, this study investigated the following research question: How well aligned are large-scale assessments and report-card grades?

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Performance based accountability in Canadian educationAuthor(s): Sonia Ben Jaafar; Loma Earl
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on performance-based accountability in Canadian education:

"In Canada, each jurisdiction continues to invest substantial resources to develop and implement individual performance-based accountability systems. Each Ministry of Education claims its model improves student achievement and school practices. They make this claim based on their observations and experience with testing as opposed to concrete evidence that compares the influence of different models on actual practice."

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Pre-service Teachers Knowledge About Ontario’s Large-scale AssessmentsAuthor(s): Ruth Childs; Alexandra Lawson (2003)
This study investigated pre-service teachers’ knowledge about Ontario’s large-scale assessments developed by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

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