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Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

This document has been viewed 1,429 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Fan, X. & Chen, M. (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,028 times.
Does School Size Affect Student Achievement?Author(s): Jones K.R. and Ezeife A.N. (2011)
There has been much debate about the impact of school characteristics (such as school and classroom size) on student achievement. This study investigated the relationship between the size of a school — how large a school is in terms of student enrollment — and the academic achievement of students within that school.

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Student Self-handicapping in Mathematics ClassroomsAuthor(s): Ferguson, J. M., Dorman, J. P. (2003)
This study investigated the relationship between classroom environment and secondary students self-handicapping behaviour. The researchers define self-handicapping as a “proactive, avoidance behaviour... designed to manipulate other people’s perceptions of performance outcomes so that the self-handicapping student appears worthy to other people in the school”. Examples of self-handicapping behaviour include deliberately not trying in class, fooling around the night before an examination, and putting off studying until the last minute.

This document has been viewed 705 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada?Author(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

This document has been viewed 1,123 times.