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Adolescent Attitudes Towards SchizophreniaAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Irving, H., Paglia-Boak, A., and Adalf, E. (2010)
This study investigated adolescent knowledge of schizophrenia and their attitudes towards persons with the disorder. This study aimed to understand the how knowledge about schizophrenia is associated with social distancing behavior (or behaving in a way to not wanting to associate with people with schizophrenia).

This document has been viewed 617 times.
Adolescent identity as a buffer against peer pressure & risk behavioursAuthor(s): Dumas, T., Ellis, W., Wolfe, D. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study explored whether youths’ level of identity exploration and commitment to identity would moderate the relationship between peer pressure and control and risk behaviours. Over 1,000 students completed self-report measures of identity exploration, identity commitment, risky behaviours, and experiences of peer-group pressure and control.


This document has been viewed 205 times.
Adolescent Stress and Coping StrategiesAuthor(s): Montgomery, C.
Academic performance has become one of the most prevalent stressors in western society for adolescents, and certain coping strategies can predict high school dropout (Hess & Copeland, 2001). However, studies on adolescent stress and coping present divergent causes of adolescent stress related to the environment. Moreover, results differ in terms of the way adolescents regulate their stress and coping. This literature review examines the scientific literature on the theme of adolescent stress and coping between 1997 and present and will answer the following questions in order to better understand high school dropout:
Question 1: What are the main causes of adolescents’ environmental stress?
Question 2: How do adolescents regulate their stress and coping?

This document has been viewed 1,864 times.
Adolescents’ knowledge of and stigma towards schizophreniaAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Irving, H., Paglia-Boak, A. & Adlaf, E. (2010)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"For people living with mental illness, stigma can be a large barrier that prevents improvement in their lives. But little research has been done to understand how stigma emerges in youth. This research explores how adolescent stigma toward people with schizophrenia is related to demographics. It also looks at how much knowledge adolescents have about the mental disorder."

This document has been viewed 1,269 times.
Anti-bullying programs in schoolsAuthor(s): Farrington, D., Tfofi, M. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 systematic review of anti-bullying programs by David P Farrington and Maria M Tfofi.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,236 times.
Anxiety Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Neil, A., Christensen, H. (2011)
This research summary was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines Alison L. Neil and Helen Christensen's 2009 systematic review of school-based and early intervention programs for anxiety.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,015 times.
Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

This document has been viewed 1,427 times.
Bullying at school: Students report unsafe and high bullying areas within their schoolAuthor(s): Vaillancourt, T., Brittain, H., Bennett, L., Arnocky, S., McDougall, P., Hymel, S. Short, K., Sunderani, S. Scott, C. Mackenzie, M., Cunningham, L. (2010)
Bullying can cause a number of psychological and social issues in victims such as depression, poor self-image and greater dependency on adults. Bullying is common in elementary and secondary schooling and Canadian schools are no exception. Statistics show that more than one-third of Canadian students are either bullied, involved in bullying someone else, or both. Although there are a number of anti-bullying programs in effect in Canadian schools, reviews show that most have either shown no effect on reducing bullying rates, or in some cases, have actually caused harm. There is agreement that anti-bullying programs could be improved with increased adult supervision in certain areas (i.e. cafeteria, gym, etc.) where students are frequently bullied. This research surveyed elementary and secondary school students to identify such areas.

This document has been viewed 975 times.
Bullying predicts dating violence & poor relationship qualityAuthor(s): Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study showed that bullying predicts dating violence and poor relationship quality in adolescent dating relationships. These results illustrate how peer and dating relationship contexts are interconnected during adolescence. Youth who display aggression and other unhealthy behaviours in one type of relationship are likely to do so in others as well....

This document has been viewed 280 times.
Bullying, student-teacher relationships, and academic performanceAuthor(s): Konishi, C., Hymel, S., Zumbo, B., Li, Z. (2010)
Research conducted in Ontario schools has shown that large numbers of students experience violence and bullying in schools. Bullying has been found to have a negative impact on school performance and student development in general. This study looked at whether student’s academic performance is related to rates of bullying at school level, whether student-teacher connectedness has an impact on the bullying-achievement relationship and whether students who feel they have a positive relationship with their teachers perform well academically even if bullying happens at their school.

This document has been viewed 1,647 times.
Contextual Learning at Summer CampAuthor(s): Fine, S. (2005)
This research explores how contexts linked to residential outdoor experiences (ROE) contribute to significant learning. It addresses the need for the reconsideration and restoration of routine outdoor programs in Ontario schools and teacher training in this area.

This document has been viewed 932 times.
Depression Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Calear, A., Christensen, H. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2010 systematic review of school-based prevention and early intervention programs for depression, by Alison L. Calear and Helen Christensen.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 990 times.
Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction and Depression Among AdolescentsAuthor(s): Goldfield, G.S., Moore, C., Henderson, K., Buchholz, A., Obeid, N. and Flament, M.F. (2010)
This study investigated eating disorder behaviour, body dissatisfaction and symptoms of depression among Canadian adolescents.

This document has been viewed 868 times.
Effective Elements of Suicide Prevention programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Balaguru, V, Sharma, J, Waheed, W. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2012 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by Balaguru, Sharma and Waheed.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 254 times.
Effective Strategies & Programs to Address Truancy (Unexcused Student Absence from School)Author(s): National Centre for School Engagement (2007)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on strategies and programs that address truancy (unexcused student absence from school).
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

This document has been viewed 1,114 times.
Effectiveness of Suicide Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Katz, C., Bolton, S., Katz, L., Isaak, C., Tilston-Jones, T., and Sareen, J. (2013)
his research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2013 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by
Katz, Bolton, Katz, Isaak, Tilston-Jones and Sareen.

http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 257 times.
Factors related to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents seeking mental health servicesAuthor(s): Stewart, S., Baiden, P. and Theall-Honey, L. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study examined the frequency of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents with mental health needs and identified specific factors related to NSSI. Data on 2,013 adolescents were gathered from the Ontario Mental Health Reporting System using the Resident Assessment Instrument—Mental Health (RAI-MH). The researchers found increased NSSI in adolescents with mood or personality disorders, histories of abuse, substance use and intentional misuse of prescription medication, and higher rates of NSSI in females. The researchers highlighted the importance of novel findings in regards to intentional misuse of prescription medications in this population.

This document has been viewed 304 times.
Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): Cairney, J., Kwan, M.Y.W., Velduizen, S., Hay, J., Bray, S.R., & Faught, B.E. (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 981 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

This document has been viewed 745 times.
How does social anxiety affect young children?Author(s): Weeks, M., Coplan R.J. and Kingsbury, A. (2009)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

"A young child with anxiety symptoms may be at risk of experiencing anxiety in their adolescence and adulthood....This study examines the effects of subclinical social anxiety on early elementary school
children."

This document has been viewed 1,213 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hamilton, H.A., Marshall, L., Rummens, J.A., Fenta, H. & Simich, L. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 946 times.
Increasing peer resistance skills through a school-based interventionAuthor(s): Wolfe, D., Crooks, C., Chiodo, D., Hughes, R., Ellis, W. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The Fourth R is an evidence based intervention in schools that teaches youth how to have healthy relationships. Students who participate in the program learn strategies that can reduce their likelihood of engaging in peer pressure scenarios (when pressured to use drugs or alcohol, have unsafe sex, or witness peer violence perpetration at a higher rate).

This document has been viewed 256 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,345 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Savaria, E. (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

This document has been viewed 1,014 times.
Is it Better to Have Generalist or Specialist Teachers Teach Physical Education in Elementary Schools?Author(s): Faulkner, G., Dwyer; J., Irving, H., Allison, K., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J. (2008)
This research investigated whether Physical Education (PE) specialist teachers delivered more PE lessons and provide increased opportunities for moderate and vigorous physical activity than generalist teachers. The researchers also examined whether specialist or generalist PE teachers had any impact on perceptions of Physical activity within the broader school, and whether either teacher had an impact on the engagement of students in extracurricular physical activities, such as intramural sports, offered within a school.

This document has been viewed 937 times.
Link between non-suicidal self-injury & suicidal behavioursAuthor(s): Hamza, C., Stewart, S., Willoughby, T. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

NSSI and suicidal behaviours are different behaviours that often co-occur. Little attention has been given to why these behaviours are linked. Since NSSI is considered one of the most significant risk factor for suicidal behaviours, it is crucial to examine the mechanism through which this occurs. Three theories have been proposed to explain the link between NSSI and suicidal behaviours and, in this summary, an integrated model of these theories is introduced.

This document has been viewed 189 times.
Neighbourhood connectedness can reduce teen drug useAuthor(s): Erickson, P.G., Adlaf, E.M., Harrison, L., Cook, S. & Cousineau, M. (2012)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly
OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Collective Efficacy is a theory that has been shown to explain for patterns in youth crime at the neighbourhood and community level. It suggests that when parents are well connected to their children’s friends and the other people in the neighbourhood, and are willing to intervene for the common good, this decreases the likelihood of youth crime
occurring. This study tested to see if this theory could be applied to predict drug use among adolescents."

This document has been viewed 1,119 times.
Parents' experiences seeking help for their children with mental health issuesAuthor(s): Reid, G., Cunningham, C., Tobon, J. and Evans, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

Having families involved with multiple mental health agencies can lead to greater system costs, increased burdens on families,
insufficient treatment, or unequal distribution of services. Administrators and policymakers may find this study interesting in order to re-evaluate the structure and service model of the mental health system.

This document has been viewed 568 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): Fedewa, A. & Soyeon, A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

This document has been viewed 655 times.
Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Dwyer, J., Kenneth, A., LeMoine, K., Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J., and Lysy, D. (2008)
The role of schools in providing opportunities for physical activity has become a topic of importance, as previous studies in Canada report both an increase in childhood obesity and a decrease in children’s daily physical activity. This study examines the physical activity programs offered in Ontario schools and the barriers that educators believe exist to providing these programs.

This document has been viewed 806 times.
Poor peer & family relationships predict dating violence in adolescent girlsAuthor(s): Chiodo, D., Crooks, C.V., Wolfe, D.A., McIsaac, C., Hughs, R., and Jaffe, P.G. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The findings from this study underscore the importance of developing early prevention programming to enhance adolescent feelings of school connectedness, positive school attitudes, and engaging in personal control to reduce the likelihood of involvement in dating violence.

This document has been viewed 269 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Craig, K., Bell, D.& Leschied, A. (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

This document has been viewed 1,421 times.
Prevent Bullying by Promoting Healthy RelationshipsAuthor(s): Pepler, D. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of bullying prevention:

"Teachers are critical in socializing children and shaping their relationships through moment-tomoment
interactions with their students. Through 20 years of research, we have come to
understand bullying as a relationship problem in which an individual uses power and aggression
to control and distress another....If bullying is a relationship problem, then it requires relationship solutions."

This document has been viewed 1,626 times.
Preventing Alcohol Use Problems Among Aboriginal YouthAuthor(s): Rawana J.S and Ames M.E. (2011)
This summary was produced by EENet. For more information on EENet and access to other summaries, please visit http://eenet.ca/

Youth who experiment with alcohol may be at risk of future alcohol use problems. Studies and trends show that Aboriginal youth may be at an even greater risk of developing such alcohol and drug use problems. For all teens, certain risk factors may worsen their vulnerability to developing alcohol disorders. Likewise, certain protective factors ward off alcohol dependence amongst teens. This study examines the protective factors of alcohol use among off-reserve Canadian Aboriginal youth.

This document has been viewed 1,037 times.
Programs in Brief: Positive Action® ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST, HWDSB (2013)
This "Programs in Brief" was developed by the E-BEST team at the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. You can view this and other summaries at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/about/research/

Positive Action® is a social and emotional learning (SEL) program
focused on promoting social skills and personal growth in students.

This document has been viewed 164 times.
Psychological and educational interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescentsAuthor(s): Merry, S. N., Hetrick, S. E., Cox, G. R., Brudevold‐ Iverson, T., Bir, J. J., & McDowell, H. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on psychological and educational interventions. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether psychological and/or educational interventions are effective in preventing depression in children and adolescents....When compared with no intervention, programs showed an immediate reduction in risk of depression."

This document has been viewed 1,000 times.
Resilient, Active, and Flourishing: Supporting Positive Mental Health and Well-Being in School CommunitiesAuthor(s): Carney, P. and Parr, M. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary explores how school communities can
create cultures that support positive mental health and well-being in
practical and effective ways.

This document has been viewed 333 times.
School Injury Among Ottawa-Area StudentsAuthor(s): Josse, J., Mackay M., Osmond M. & Macpherson, A. (2009)
This study investigated the factors that influence the likelihood that a student will become injured at school, and identified trends surrounding the nature of injuries and the locations where injuries are likely to occur.

This document has been viewed 852 times.
School-based violence prevention program offers a protective impact for youth with maltreatment historiesAuthor(s): Crooks, C., Scott, K., Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2011)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This research highlights the benefits of an inexpensive school-based violence prevention program. This program demonstrates support for the reduction of dating violence among students and the protective effect for maltreated youth, lowering their likelihood of engaging in violent delinquency. These results also suggest that a short-term violence prevention program can have significant and meaningful long-term results.

This document has been viewed 304 times.
Sexual Health Education Among Teens New to CanadaAuthor(s): Salehi, R. and Flicker, S. and the Toronto Teen Survey Team. (2010)
This research article describes part of a larger study that explored the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. Specifically, this article investigates the factors that influence teens’ access to sexual health education with a focus on newcomers to Canada.

This document has been viewed 662 times.
Sexual Health Topics: What Teens Want to KnowAuthor(s): Causarano, N.; Pole, J. D.; Flicker S. & Toronto Teen Survey Team (2012)
This research article describes one part of a larger study that investigated the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. It also explores the relationship between religion and teenagers’ exposure to, and desire to, learn more about various sexual health topics including sexually transmitted infections and birth control options.

This document has been viewed 869 times.
Smoking in Ontario Schools: Does policy make a difference?Author(s): Reitsma, A., Manske, S. (2004)
Although tobacco use has decreased in Canada it remains the country’s leading cause of premature death. Most people (85%) start smoking before the age of 18 despite the fact that Canadian federal laws make it illegal for people under the age of 18 to buy cigarettes. Many provinces set the bar at 19 years. Therefore, schools are a key environment to support youth remaining tobacco-free.
The researchers in this study assessed the link between school tobacco policy and smoking status in Ontario elementary and secondary schools in 2003.

This document has been viewed 1,035 times.
Students report their perception of, and satisfaction with, school-based sexual health educationAuthor(s): Meaney, G., Rye, B.J., Wood, E. and Soloviena, E. (2009)
This study investigated high school graduates’ perceptions of and satisfaction with their school-based sexual health education. In particular, the researchers were interested in how gender and the type of school attended (public or Catholic) impacted graduates’ views of their sexual health education.

This document has been viewed 631 times.
Supporting Students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): An Intervention ModelAuthor(s): Missiuna, C., Pollock, N., Campbell, W. N., Bennett, S., Hecimovich, C., Gaines, R., DeCola, C., Cairney, J., Russell, D and Molinaro, E. (2012)
Many students in Ontario’s public schools receive occupational therapy services to meet a variety of needs. Often, this involves a qualified occupational therapist (OT) working one-on-one with a student within the school setting. Unfortunately, there are not enough OTs available to work with all of the students who need support, and students can wait between 1 to 2 years on a waitlist before receiving OT service (Deloitte & Touche, 2010).

Partnering for Change (P4C) is an innovative service delivery intervention model for students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).In the P4C intervention model, OTs work with classroom teachers and parents to build their capacity in supporting students’ occupational therapy needs. For example, OTs will coach parents and teachers to identify and implement strategies to improve students’ functioning at school.

This document has been viewed 1,046 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Irving, H., Allison, K. and Dwyer, J. (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 807 times.
The Impact of Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” Program on Students’ Oral HealthAuthor(s): Muirhead, V. and Lawrence, H. (2011)
While many school-based oral health initiatives have targeted specific behaviors such as tooth brushing, this study examined the impact of the broader Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” initiative on the oral health of students. Launched in 2006, this program focuses on broader issues of health promotion including healthy eating, substance use, physical activity, and personal safety amongst others.

This document has been viewed 548 times.
The New Mentality: Youth-adult partnerships in community mental health promotionAuthor(s): Ramey, H. and Rose-Krasnor, L. (2015)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet, formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

Brock University researchers examined The New Mentality pilot program to explore what makes youth-adult partnerships work, and identify the potential benefit of youth-adult partnerships in child and youth community mental health promotion.

This document has been viewed 344 times.
What are young bloggers saying about mental health?Author(s): Marcus, M.A., Westra, H., Eastwood, J.D. & Barnes, K.L. (2012)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly
OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"The widespread use of Internet blogs has created a unique space for hearing from young people. Few studies, however, have looked at these blogs to gain a better picture of the experiences of young people with mental health problems – until now."

This document has been viewed 1,562 times.
What do teen immigrants say about drug addition?Author(s): Hamilton, H., Mann, R. and Noh, S. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

This study looks at what stigmas teens have against drug addiction and what factors lead to these attitudes. Educators may be interested in these findings because most drug prevention programs make use of stigmas and direct their anti-drug messages at young teens.

This document has been viewed 593 times.
What factors affect hospitalization of youth with mental health problems in Ontario?Author(s): Shannon Stewart, Chester Kam, and Phillip Baiden (2013)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet, formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

This study aimed to clarify the specific factors that affect how long youth stay in hospital for mental health problems and how likely they
are to be readmitted in the future.

This document has been viewed 224 times.
What Factors Impact Student Enrollment in Physical Education Classes?Author(s): Hobin E.P., Leatherdale S., Manske S., Burkhalter R.J., & Woodruff, S.J. (2010)
While it is generally believed that regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, the amount of time teenagers spend being physically active can vary greatly. This study compared the enrollment rates of students in physical education (PE) courses in secondary schools across Ontario and the factors that impact this enrollment.

This document has been viewed 883 times.