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Adolescent Stress and Coping StrategiesAuthor(s): Montgomery, C.
Academic performance has become one of the most prevalent stressors in western society for adolescents, and certain coping strategies can predict high school dropout (Hess & Copeland, 2001). However, studies on adolescent stress and coping present divergent causes of adolescent stress related to the environment. Moreover, results differ in terms of the way adolescents regulate their stress and coping. This literature review examines the scientific literature on the theme of adolescent stress and coping between 1997 and present and will answer the following questions in order to better understand high school dropout:
Question 1: What are the main causes of adolescents’ environmental stress?
Question 2: How do adolescents regulate their stress and coping?

This document has been viewed 1,864 times.
Assessing Text Difficulty for StudentsAuthor(s): Murphy, S. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores three key kinds of knowledge that may help teachers arrive at more informed and defensible judgments about the likelihood of a text’s readability for children:
1. knowledge about the reader’s characteristics and the reading task
2. knowledge about the surface features of a text
3.knowledge about the deeper features of texts and the modalities represented in the text.

This document has been viewed 1,189 times.
Assistive Technology Tools: Supporting Literacy Learning for all Learners in the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): Sider, S.; Maich, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

We are particularly interested in considering how assistive technology can be used to support the literacy achievement of all students, an area not frequently examined in the scholarly literature. In this article, we discuss the range of assistive technology tools available to students and teachers from a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) perspective, wherein strategies, resources and tools are incorporated with the needs of all students in mind.

This document has been viewed 1,687 times.
Best Practices in Walk-Throughs, an Instructional Supervision Technique, and the Impact on Student AchievementAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2009)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on best practices for walk-throughs as an instructional supervision strategy to increase student acheivement. You can also view this, and other BLAMs, at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

"Overall, the literature summarized in this BLAM, shows that walk-throughs can have a positive impact on student achievement
providing that they are transparent, non-evaluative, focused on an
improvement area and conducted frequently (at least once per
week). Walk-throughs should facilitate open dialogue between
teachers and principals..."

This document has been viewed 1,282 times.
Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

This document has been viewed 1,427 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,581 times.
Calling Upon Other Language Skills to Enhance Second Language LearningAuthor(s): Mady, C. and Garbati, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

The impact of other languages on students’ target language proficiency and the degree to which they should be used in the second language classroom remain topics of debate. This monograph explores why and how to make use of students’ prior language knowledge in the second language class.

This document has been viewed 843 times.
College MathematicsAuthor(s): Orpwood, G., Schollen, L. (2011)
The College Mathematics Project tracks first semester college mathematics achievement in all 24 colleges in Ontario, relating it to age, gender, and students secondary school mathematics backgrounds. It also promotes deliberations concerning ways to
increase student success in college mathematics.

This document has been viewed 1,004 times.
Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Lataille-Démoré, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

This document has been viewed 1,455 times.
Computer Assisted LearningAuthor(s): Hattie, J. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 summary about computer assisted learning by John Hattie
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 827 times.
Cultivating Student Engagement Through Interactive Art StrategiesAuthor(s): Cho, C.; Vitale, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

While we know that engaged students are more invested in their learning, the arts remain an underutilized strategy for student engagement. The reality is that many teachers lack confidence teaching both visual arts and music. We feel strongly that the generalist teacher can develop a repertoire of strategies – such as those discussed here – to increase their confidence and provide authentic and sincere arts-based experiences for learners.

This document has been viewed 984 times.
Culturally Relevant School-Based Programming for FNMI Youth: Improved Relationships, Confidence, Leadership and School SuccessAuthor(s): Crooks, C., Burleigh, D., Snowshoe, A., Lapp, A., Hughes, R. and Sisco, A. (2015)
This study evaluated the Fourth R Uniting Our Nations, a school-based, culturally relevant program for FNMI youth. Results highlighted multiple positive impacts of the program. Participants reported that...

This document has been viewed 270 times.
Do language exchange programs influence students’ willingness to communicate in their second language?Author(s): Mady, C. (2011)
In previous research, exchange programs have been shown to impact students’ willingness to communicate in their second language (Yashima, Zenuk- Nishide, & Shimizu, 2004).

This particular study examined the impact a short-term Canadian bilingual exchange program had on Anglophone and Francophone language learners’ willingness to communicate in their second language.

This document has been viewed 899 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Fan, X. & Chen, M. (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,028 times.
Does School Size Affect Student Achievement?Author(s): Jones K.R. and Ezeife A.N. (2011)
There has been much debate about the impact of school characteristics (such as school and classroom size) on student achievement. This study investigated the relationship between the size of a school — how large a school is in terms of student enrollment — and the academic achievement of students within that school.

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

This document has been viewed 1,151 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,345 times.
Learning Mathematics vs Following “Rules”: The Value of Student-Generated MethodsAuthor(s): Lawson, A. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"There has been a significant shift in the instruction of mathematics over the past
two decades. This shift has occurred in response to growing evidence that students
were learning how to apply mathematics rules without a real understanding of
the mathematics. A particularly disconcerting observation was that student
difficulties often stemmed from our longstanding traditional methods of
mathematics instruction."


This document has been viewed 2,058 times.
Making Math Children Will LoveAuthor(s): Colgan, L. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Evidence suggests that learning is energized by affect. We, as educators, must turn our attention to resources and strategies that improve students’ relationships with mathematics content and processes and pique students’ motivation, emotion, interest and attention.

This document has been viewed 823 times.
Neighbourhood connectedness can reduce teen drug useAuthor(s): Erickson, P.G., Adlaf, E.M., Harrison, L., Cook, S. & Cousineau, M. (2012)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly
OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Collective Efficacy is a theory that has been shown to explain for patterns in youth crime at the neighbourhood and community level. It suggests that when parents are well connected to their children’s friends and the other people in the neighbourhood, and are willing to intervene for the common good, this decreases the likelihood of youth crime
occurring. This study tested to see if this theory could be applied to predict drug use among adolescents."

This document has been viewed 1,119 times.
Parent EngagementAuthor(s): Pushor, D. (2010)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of parent engagement:

"A wealth of research concludes that students are more likely to be successful when their parents are
engaged in their education....In light of this evidence, meaningful relationships that enhance parents’ opportunities to make important
contributions to student learning are vital to the work of teachers."

This document has been viewed 884 times.
Performing Poetry: Using Drama to Increase the Comprehension on PoetryAuthor(s): Ferguson, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Poetry can be both challenging and intimidating to teach and learn. But how can teachers teach poetry comprehension without falling into the trap of mechanically dissecting poems for form and “real” meaning? Drama is one strategy, grounded in research, that fosters student comprehension of poetry and allows students to apply comprehension strategies.

This document has been viewed 1,014 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): Fedewa, A. & Soyeon, A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

This document has been viewed 655 times.
Promoting Curriculum Access in Children and Youth with Reading DisabiliitesAuthor(s): Martinussen, R.
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 836 times.
Student Interaction in the Math Classroom: Stealing Ideas or Building UnderstandingAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Research tells us that student interaction – through classroom discussion and other forms of interactive participation – is foundational to deep understanding and related student achievement. But implementing discussion in the mathematics classroom has been found to be challenging."

This document has been viewed 2,211 times.
Supporting Struggling WritersAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Sadly, some students struggle in their attempts to communicate what they have learned and to interact with others through writing. This summary explores research which provides many strategies for addressing these students’ specific writing difficulties and enhancing their motivation to write.

This document has been viewed 786 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

This document has been viewed 1,086 times.
Teaching Elementary MathAuthor(s): Small, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"Teaching through problem solving is about setting appropriate tasks, creating supportive environments and helping students to succeed without leading. Although some would argue that all mathematical tasks should be of this sort, others see it as one approach within a more varied menu. No matter the frequency of problem solving use, it is essential that students have opportunities to learn by thinking and doing and not by simply copying."

This document has been viewed 779 times.
The Educational Implications of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderAuthor(s): Tannock, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers should be aware that although there are many different perspectives on
ADHD, there is ample scientific evidence affirming its existence and its detrimental
impact on individuals. Classroom practices can make a difference for children with
ADHD."

This document has been viewed 2,573 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Flynn, R., Marquis, R., Paquet, M., Peeke, L. & Aubry, T. (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

This document has been viewed 1,111 times.
The Inclusion of English Language Learners in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study examined French as a Second Language teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about the inclusion of English Language Learner (ELL) students in French as an Official Second Language (FSOL) classes.

This document has been viewed 766 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 1,066 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

This document has been viewed 1,206 times.
Try Literacy Tutoring FirstAuthor(s): Berrill, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy tutoring:

"In everyday teaching practice, teachers are on the move, circulating to see who needs help and pausing to give individualized, focused support. Yet, some children need significantly more time than teachers with responsibilities to the whole class can provide. Teachers know who these children are and find various ways to support their learning, from pairing them with more able peers and structuring guided reading activities, to providing differentiated instruction with materials for different ability levels. However, some children need still more assistance, both in terms of the frequency and the duration of the support they require. What else can teachers do?"

This document has been viewed 977 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Millett, P. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,230 times.
Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): McQuirter Scott, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

This document has been viewed 1,153 times.
What Complexity Science Tells Us about Teaching and LearningAuthor(s): Stanley, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Although complexity is
often perceived as a liability, this monograph considers how it can be viewed as
an asset and how the ideas behind complexity science might inform pedagogical
practices."

This document has been viewed 1,116 times.
What do we know about school climate?Author(s): Thapa, A, Cohen J, Guffey S, Higgins-D’Alessandro A. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2013 literature review on school climate by Thapa, Cohen, Guffey, & Higgens-D'Alessandro.

This document has been viewed 879 times.