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Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jones, J., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Vilela, T. & Brown, H. (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

This document has been viewed 1,160 times.
Does Including Students With Special Needs in Grade 3 Classes Affect the Achievement of Students Without Special Needs?Author(s): Henk Demeris; Ruth Childs; Anne Jordan
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on the inclusion of special needs students in a Grade 3 classroom:

"Some parents and educators worry that inclusion – that is, placing students with special needs in the regular classroom – will negatively affect the academic achievement of the students without special needs, for example, by creating more demands on the teacher’s attention and for other resources. This study uses data from the 1997-1998 Ontario provincial assessment to investigate the relationship between the number of students with special needs in almost 2,000 grade-3 classes and the achievement scores of their peers without special needs."

This document has been viewed 950 times.
Ensuring Students with Learning Disabilities Have Proper Documentation as they Transition into Post-secondary InstitutionsAuthor(s): Harrison, A.G., Nichols, E., Larochette, A. (2008)
The Ontario Human Rights Code (1990) guarantees students diagnosed with a learning disability (LD) the right to accommodations that meet their academic needs at the post-secondary level (College and University). Not all students, however, arrive equipped with the necessary documentation to guarantee this support. This study investigated the quality of documentation presented by students entering post-secondary institutions in support of their LD and, in so doing, exposes current practices for identifying students (declaring students Exceptional) at the elementary and secondary levels.

This document has been viewed 1,060 times.
Inclusion in French classroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K.
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

This document has been viewed 689 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Elizabeth Savaria (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

This document has been viewed 998 times.
Promoting Curriculum Access in Children and Youth with Reading DisabiliitesAuthor(s): Martinussen, R.
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 816 times.
Special Education Programming: Principal’s Report on Their Leadership Role(s) in Special Education Programming and Their Professional Development NeedsAuthor(s): Zaretsky, L., Moreau, L., and Faircloth, S. (2008)
This study examined principal’s perceptions of what it means to provide leadership in special education: how they believe they demonstrate this leadership in their schools, how well they believe they are prepared to engage in these roles, and their perceived professional development needs in this area.

This document has been viewed 870 times.
Supporting Teachers to Work with Children with ExceptionalitiesAuthor(s): Killoran, I., Zaretsky, H, Jordan, A., Smith, D., Allard, C. & Moloney, J. (2012).
The study had two purposes. The College of Teachers wanted to explore further revisions to the Three-Part Schedule D AQ courses in Special Education. The researchers wanted to determine how a virtual network could support the implementation of the revised AQ guidelines and build capacity for teachers working with children with exceptionalities. The findings point to how a network could be designed to support the implementation of revised AQ course guidelines and build teacher capacity.

This document has been viewed 796 times.
Teachers Identify Their Coping Strategies for the Perceived Stresses of Inclusive ClassroomsAuthor(s): Darlene Brackenreed (2011)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms can be a stressful experience for Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigated the coping strategies used by teachers in Ontario to manage this stress.

This document has been viewed 958 times.
Teachers report the factors that cause them stress when teaching inclusive classroomsAuthor(s): Brackenreed, D. (2008)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms has been a stressful experience for many Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigates teacher perceptions of the “stressors” (specific causes of stress) that result from the inclusion of special needs students in the regular classroom.

This document has been viewed 1,234 times.
The Educational Implications of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderAuthor(s): Rosemary Tannock
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers should be aware that although there are many different perspectives on
ADHD, there is ample scientific evidence affirming its existence and its detrimental
impact on individuals. Classroom practices can make a difference for children with
ADHD."

This document has been viewed 2,486 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Pamela Millett
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,216 times.