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Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Gillian Parekh; Isabel Killoran; Cameron Crawford (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

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Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): James Kim and David Quinn (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from
low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures
of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

This document has been viewed 717 times.
Equity measures compared between three provincesAuthor(s): Xiaobin Li
This study compares the elementary education funding formula in Ontario, Alberta, and BC with a focus on
vertical equity from the students’ perspective. The similarities and differences, particularly the measures
related to assisting disadvantaged students, of the three formula are analyzed and their possible implications are explored. With increasingly diverse students in schools, it is important to understand how equity measures in provincial funding formula work to meet the needs of all students.

This document has been viewed 808 times.
Healthy Relationships Program Improves Adolescents' Ability to Manage Peer ViolenceAuthor(s): Claire Crooks, Katreena Scott, Ryan Broll, Suzanne Zwarych, Ray Hughes and David Wolfe (2015)
This study investigated whether a healthy relationships program would improve students’ social and emotional skills related to knowledge about violence, critical thinking about the impact of violence, identification of coping strategies, and their
acceptability of violence. The researchers found that...

This document has been viewed 115 times.
Kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' literacy knowledge and parental involvementAuthor(s): Jacqueline Lynch (2010)
This study examined whether there were differences in kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' print literacy
knowledge and about parental involvement in children's literacy events based on the socio-economic status (SES) of children's families.

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Monocultural to Multicultural: Parent PerceptionsAuthor(s): Cynthia Levine-Rasky
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on parent perceptions on multiculturalism:

"Cynthia Levine-Rasky of Queen’s University conducted a study of one elementary public school where, as a result of an increase to the immigrant population in the elementary school’s catchment area, a significant shift from being predominantly white and middle class to a more diverse student body occurred."

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Predicting Students' FuturesAuthor(s): Ben Levin
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of predicting students' futures:

"Teachers often feel that they can predict students’ futures; that we can tell by, say, age 6 or 8
students’ academic destinies. This view is strengthened by studies that show a strong relationship
between various characteristics of students, such as their socio-economic status or their school
readiness, and their later achievement. In fact, predictions of this kind are fraught with problems....History is not destiny. We know that with the right supports, most people can achieve far more than anyone thought they could."

This document has been viewed 837 times.