Search Results

Mise en œuvre de programmes de promotion de la santé en milieu scolaireAuthor(s): Pearson, M., Chilton, R., Wya , K., Abraham, C., Ford, T., Woods, H., & Anderson, R. (2015)
Ceci est un résumé de recherche mis à jour développé par le Réseau d’échange des connaissances pour le bien-être des élèves (KNSWB). Depuis longtemps, on considère les écoles comme étant le lieu principal où sont proposés les programmes faisant la promotion de la santé chez les enfants. Dans le cadre des méthodes faisant la promotion de la santé, les sujets abordés actuellement sont la consommation d’alcool, l’usage de drogues, le tabagisme, l’obésité, l’activité physique, le développement et la santé sexuelle, les relations saines et le bien-être. Des examens récents laissent penser que certaines stratégies sont plus efficaces que d’autres à mettre en œuvre des programmes faisant la promotion de la santé dans les écoles.

Viewed 36 times.
Increasing Peer Resistance Skills Through a School-Based InterventionAuthor(s): Wolfe, D., Crooks, C., Chiodo, D., Hughes, R., Ellis, W. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The Fourth R is an evidence based intervention in schools that teaches youth how to have healthy relationships. Students who participate in the program learn strategies that can reduce their likelihood of engaging in peer pressure scenarios (when pressured to use drugs or alcohol, have unsafe sex, or witness peer violence perpetration at a higher rate).

Viewed 349 times.
Sexual Health Education Among Teens New to CanadaAuthor(s): Salehi, R. and Flicker, S. and the Toronto Teen Survey Team. (2010)
This research article describes part of a larger study that explored the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. Specifically, this article investigates the factors that influence teens’ access to sexual health education with a focus on newcomers to Canada.

Viewed 696 times.
Students report their perception of, and satisfaction with, school-based sexual health educationAuthor(s): Meaney, G., Rye, B.J., Wood, E. and Soloviena, E. (2009)
This study investigated high school graduates’ perceptions of and satisfaction with their school-based sexual health education. In particular, the researchers were interested in how gender and the type of school attended (public or Catholic) impacted graduates’ views of their sexual health education.

Viewed 676 times.
Sexual Health Topics: What Teens Want to KnowAuthor(s): Causarano, N.; Pole, J. D.; Flicker S. & Toronto Teen Survey Team (2012)
This research article describes one part of a larger study that investigated the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. It also explores the relationship between religion and teenagers’ exposure to, and desire to, learn more about various sexual health topics including sexually transmitted infections and birth control options.

Viewed 1,000 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Irving, H., Allison, K. and Dwyer, J. (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


Viewed 848 times.
What parents expect from ED mental health services for youthAuthor(s): Cloutier P., Kennedy, A., Maysenhoelder H, Glennie E.J., Cappelli, M. & Gray, C. (2010)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

Many youth go to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a variety of mental health issues. A child’s parents or caregivers
are often a clinician’s main source of information about the youth, their history, and the crisis situation. In this way, caregivers’
perceptions can play a huge role in the way the clinician administers care for the youth. The caregiver also represents a second set of
expectations that need to be met. However, there is no standardized way of getting information from caregivers. This study
examines parental expectations for ED mental health services for youth.

Viewed 937 times.
Gender Stereotypes and Musical InstrumentsAuthor(s): Buttu, S. (2008)
This study investigated the perceptions of girls enrolled in a single-sex school about gender stereotypes in relation to musical instruments. The research study focused on whether stereotypes impact girls’ decisions to play a certain instrument and how girls from an all girl school describe their experiences of playing their instruments in their own school and in co-educational environments such as band camp.

Viewed 932 times.
Islamic Schooling in OntarioAuthor(s): Zine, J. (2004)
Four full-time Islamic schools are the focus of this study on alternative schooling. The objectives of this research were: to identify the role and function of Islamic schooling in a diasporic context; to understand the role of Islamic education in the development of Islamic identity; to examine the Islamization of knowledge and pedagogy in Islamic schools.

This research study also focused on the knowledge production of Islamically-centred education, the teaching strategies and ways of socialization and discipline. These areas are examined to understand the religious and spiritual traditions of Islam in schools.

Viewed 864 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

Viewed 1,270 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Bazzul, J., Sykes, H. (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

Viewed 1,430 times.
Forging Safer Learning Environments: Addressing Homophobic Bullying in SchoolsAuthor(s): Walton, G. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of bullying in schools:

"Issues concerning gender and sexuality are rich fodder for bullying. For students
who identify or are perceived as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT),
school can be especially harrowing, as these students are frequently targeted
for bullying."

Viewed 1,331 times.
Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dionne, A. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

Viewed 1,836 times.
Teaching Diverse Books to a Diverse Student PopulationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

Viewed 887 times.