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Culturally Relevant School-Based Programming for FNMI Youth: Improved Relationships, Confidence, Leadership and School SuccessAuthor(s): Crooks, C., Burleigh, D., Snowshoe, A., Lapp, A., Hughes, R. and Sisco, A. (2015)
This study evaluated the Fourth R Uniting Our Nations, a school-based, culturally relevant program for FNMI youth. Results highlighted multiple positive impacts of the program. Participants reported that...

This document has been viewed 270 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

This document has been viewed 745 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,336 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,350 times.
Student Self-handicapping in Mathematics ClassroomsAuthor(s): Ferguson, J. M., Dorman, J. P. (2003)
This study investigated the relationship between classroom environment and secondary students self-handicapping behaviour. The researchers define self-handicapping as a “proactive, avoidance behaviour... designed to manipulate other people’s perceptions of performance outcomes so that the self-handicapping student appears worthy to other people in the school”. Examples of self-handicapping behaviour include deliberately not trying in class, fooling around the night before an examination, and putting off studying until the last minute.

This document has been viewed 705 times.
Why the Arts MatterAuthor(s): Upitis, R. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of Arts education:

"Many teachers are aware that the arts can be key in reaching students who do not respond well to traditional forms of learning. The arts also help students analyze complex issues from multiple perspectives. There is mounting evidence that the arts develop critical thinking skills, contribute to self-confidence, encourage risk-taking, and bolster achievement in other subjects."

This document has been viewed 1,190 times.