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Bullying at school: Students report unsafe and high bullying areas within their schoolAuthor(s): Vaillancourt, T.; Brittain, H.; Bennett, L.; Arnocky, S., McDougall, P., Hymel, S. Short, K., Sunderani, S. Scott, C. Mackenzie, M., Cunningham, L. (2010)
Bullying can cause a number of psychological and social issues in victims such as depression, poor self-image and greater dependency on adults. Bullying is common in elementary and secondary schooling and Canadian schools are no exception. Statistics show that more than one-third of Canadian students are either bullied, involved in bullying someone else, or both. Although there are a number of anti-bullying programs in effect in Canadian schools, reviews show that most have either shown no effect on reducing bullying rates, or in some cases, have actually caused harm. There is agreement that anti-bullying programs could be improved with increased adult supervision in certain areas (i.e. cafeteria, gym, etc.) where students are frequently bullied. This research surveyed elementary and secondary school students to identify such areas.

This document has been viewed 936 times.
Career Counseling in an Ontario High SchoolAuthor(s): Hanh Quah Theresa Truong (2011)
This study investigated the career counselling practices of educators at one large Ontario high school with an enrollment of 1,300 students.

This document has been viewed 1,023 times.
Does School Size Matter?Author(s): M. Newman, Z. Garrett, D. Elbourne, S. Bradley, P. Noden, J. Taylor, A. West (2006)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2006 systematic review of research on school size and student achievement by M. Newman, Z. Garrett, D. Elbourne, S. Bradley, P. Noden, J.Taylor, and A. West. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,065 times.
Dual-credit programming: The challenges and opportunitiesAuthor(s): Bonnie Watt-Malcolm (2011)
Dual-credit systems, or the opportunity for secondary students to earn credits at high school and college levels simultaneously (Lekes et al., 2007) is well established in the United States. As part of a larger study that examines secondary school apprenticeships and partnerships, this study investigates the tensions that exist in the implementation of dual credit systems in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia with a specific focus on dual-credit for apprenticeship training.

This document has been viewed 855 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Middle and Secondary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E.; Lake, C.; Groff, C. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 systematic review of different math programs available to middle and secondary teachers by Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., & Groff, C.

This document has been viewed 843 times.
Exploring Secondary Principals' Perspectives of the Secondary Vice-Principal Role Author(s): Louis Lim (2016)
This study examined the perspectives of secondary principals of the secondary vice-principal role. According to the secondary principals interviewed, the vice-principal role has become increasingly complex with increased workload as the role is predominantly operational (by reacting to student discipline, attendance, and conflict resolution) at the expense of demonstrating instructional leadership.

This document has been viewed 55 times.
Is Gender a Consideration in the Hiring and Rotation of Secondary School Principals?Author(s): Cecilia Reynolds; Robert White; Carol Brayman; Shawn Moore (2008)
Government statistics from the early 2000s in Ontario, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia illustrate that the percentage of women secondary school principals has risen over the past thirty years. This study investigated whether gender is a factor in the hiring and rotation practices of school boards within these four provinces.

This document has been viewed 848 times.
Participation at Canadian Universities: A Growing Gender GapAuthor(s): Louis N. Christofides; Michael Hoy; Ling Yang (2010)
The participation rate of young women at universities has steadily been increasing, with women now more likely to enroll in university than men. For example, in 2005, a 15 percentage point gap existed between the participation rate of women at university compared to men. This research study investigated the factors influencing young people’s decision to attend university and whether these factors are different for men and women.

This document has been viewed 1,101 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Katrina Craig; David Bell; Alan Leschied (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

This document has been viewed 1,313 times.
School Injury Among Ottawa-Area StudentsAuthor(s): Jonathan Josse; Morag Mackay; Martin Osmond; Alison Macpherson (2009)
This study investigated the factors that influence the likelihood that a student will become injured at school, and identified trends surrounding the nature of injuries and the locations where injuries are likely to occur.

This document has been viewed 826 times.
Secondary Students’ Perceptions of School RulesAuthor(s): Rebecca Raby; Julie Domitrek (2007)
This study examined how secondary students in southern Ontario perceive and engage with their school’s code of conduct. In particular, the researchers were interested in exploring students’ opinions on specific rules, when they might accept them and when they might challenge or resist them.

This document has been viewed 574 times.
Smoking in Ontario Schools: Does policy make a difference?Author(s): Angela Reitsma; Steve Manske
Although tobacco use has decreased in Canada it remains the country’s leading cause of premature death. Most people (85%) start smoking before the age of 18 despite the fact that Canadian federal laws make it illegal for people under the age of 18 to buy cigarettes. Many provinces set the bar at 19 years. Therefore, schools are a key environment to support youth remaining tobacco-free.
The researchers in this study assessed the link between school tobacco policy and smoking status in Ontario elementary and secondary schools in 2003.

This document has been viewed 962 times.
The complexities of secondary school reform over timeAuthor(s): Andy Hargreaves; Ivor Goodson
This is a 5-year Spencer Foundation-funded longitudinal project that examines educational change over time (1970s, 1980s, and 1990s) by exploring the experiences of teachers and administrators who worked in eight secondary schools in the United States and Canada within these periods.

This document has been viewed 918 times.
The regulation of Mp3 Players and cell phones in secondary schoolAuthor(s): Julie Domitrek; Rebecca Raby
Recently, there has been much media coverage about cell phone and personal music player usage in schools, including in the
Toronto and Whitton regions. However, there is little literature on how students and teachers view rules on the use of such
electronic devices. Using data gathered from focus groups with students in Toronto and Whitton and interviews with teachers
and administrators from Whitton, we present the viewpoints from these stakeholders on the usage of cell phones and personal music players.

This document has been viewed 1,059 times.
The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Development of Secondary School YouthAuthor(s): Catherine Hands (2008)
While many Ontario schools include character development and citizenship education as part of their curriculum, these topics have traditionally been taught to students in classrooms within the boundaries of schools. This research, on the other hand, investigated a character education program in one school that involved school-community partnerships.

This document has been viewed 1,001 times.