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Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Areepattamannil, S., Freeman, J. (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

This document has been viewed 1,027 times.
Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Parekh, G., Killoran, I. and Crawford, C. (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

This document has been viewed 1,055 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

This document has been viewed 1,292 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,132 times.
Career Counseling in an Ontario High SchoolAuthor(s): Truong, H.Q.T. (2011)
This study investigated the career counselling practices of educators at one large Ontario high school with an enrollment of 1,300 students.

This document has been viewed 1,106 times.
Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

This document has been viewed 2,687 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Fan, X. & Chen, M. (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,028 times.
Does School Size Matter?Author(s): Newman, M., Garrett, Z., Elbourne, D., Bradley, S., Noden, P., Taylor, J. & West, A. (2006)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2006 systematic review of research on school size and student achievement by M. Newman, Z. Garrett, D. Elbourne, S. Bradley, P. Noden, J.Taylor, and A. West. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,126 times.
Dual-credit programming: The challenges and opportunitiesAuthor(s): Watt-Malcolm, B. (2011)
Dual-credit systems, or the opportunity for secondary students to earn credits at high school and college levels simultaneously (Lekes et al., 2007) is well established in the United States. As part of a larger study that examines secondary school apprenticeships and partnerships, this study investigates the tensions that exist in the implementation of dual credit systems in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia with a specific focus on dual-credit for apprenticeship training.

This document has been viewed 880 times.
Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction and Depression Among AdolescentsAuthor(s): Goldfield, G.S., Moore, C., Henderson, K., Buchholz, A., Obeid, N. and Flament, M.F. (2010)
This study investigated eating disorder behaviour, body dissatisfaction and symptoms of depression among Canadian adolescents.

This document has been viewed 869 times.
Effective Elements of Suicide Prevention programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Balaguru, V, Sharma, J, Waheed, W. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2012 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by Balaguru, Sharma and Waheed.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 254 times.
Effectiveness of Suicide Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Katz, C., Bolton, S., Katz, L., Isaak, C., Tilston-Jones, T., and Sareen, J. (2013)
his research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2013 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by
Katz, Bolton, Katz, Isaak, Tilston-Jones and Sareen.

http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 257 times.
Ensuring Students with Learning Disabilities Have Proper Documentation as they Transition into Post-secondary InstitutionsAuthor(s): Harrison, A.G., Nichols, E., Larochette, A. (2008)
The Ontario Human Rights Code (1990) guarantees students diagnosed with a learning disability (LD) the right to accommodations that meet their academic needs at the post-secondary level (College and University). Not all students, however, arrive equipped with the necessary documentation to guarantee this support. This study investigated the quality of documentation presented by students entering post-secondary institutions in support of their LD and, in so doing, exposes current practices for identifying students (declaring students Exceptional) at the elementary and secondary levels.

This document has been viewed 1,079 times.
Examining Race Representation in an Ontario Secondary Social Science TextbookAuthor(s): Rezai-Rashti, G.M. and McCarthy, C. (2008)
This study investigates the representations of race, multiculturalism, and anti-racism in one secondary social sciences textbook used in Ontario schools. In particular, the researchers were interested in examining how Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents for social sciences were translated into supporting textbooks by publishers.

This document has been viewed 1,116 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Bazzul, J., Sykes, H. (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

This document has been viewed 1,287 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Hyslop‐Margison, E. J., Pinto, L. (2007)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 885 times.
How Well Aligned Are Large-Scale Assessments and Report Card Grades?Author(s): Ross, J.A. & Gray, P. (2008)
The use of standardized external assessments as an indicator of student achievement has long been a controversial issue in most educational circles. This study compared students’ Education and Quality Assessment Office (EQAO) scores and their report card grades to determine whether students receive comparable ratings on the two assessments. Specifically, this study investigated the following research question: How well aligned are large-scale assessments and report-card grades?

This document has been viewed 1,137 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,350 times.
Internet Safety in SchoolsAuthor(s): Barnett, J. (2005)
This study investigated internet safety within Southern Ontario schools. Specifically, the researcher explores whether preservice teachers believe their students are involved in unsafe internet practices and whether schools are being sufficiently proactive about on-line student safety.

This document has been viewed 1,054 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Savaria, E. (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

This document has been viewed 1,014 times.
Participation at Canadian Universities: A Growing Gender GapAuthor(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2010)
The participation rate of young women at universities has steadily been increasing, with women now more likely to enroll in university than men. For example, in 2005, a 15 percentage point gap existed between the participation rate of women at university compared to men. This research study investigated the factors influencing young people’s decision to attend university and whether these factors are different for men and women.

This document has been viewed 1,180 times.
Pathways to University and the "Victory Lap" Phenomenon in OntarioAuthor(s): Brady, P., Allingham, P. (2010)
In the late 1990s, Ontario began phasing out Grade 13/OAC; however many students continued to return to high school for a fifth year. This phenomenon became known as completing a “victory
lap.” This research investigated the “victory lap” phenomenon.

This document has been viewed 1,018 times.
Pre-service Teachers Knowledge About Ontario’s Large-scale AssessmentsAuthor(s): Childs, R. & Lawson, A. (2003)
This study investigated pre-service teachers’ knowledge about Ontario’s large-scale assessments developed by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

This document has been viewed 1,068 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

This document has been viewed 1,079 times.
Psychological and educational interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescentsAuthor(s): Merry, S. N., Hetrick, S. E., Cox, G. R., Brudevold‐ Iverson, T., Bir, J. J., & McDowell, H. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on psychological and educational interventions. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether psychological and/or educational interventions are effective in preventing depression in children and adolescents....When compared with no intervention, programs showed an immediate reduction in risk of depression."

This document has been viewed 1,001 times.
Secondary Students’ Attitudes Towards “Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS)Author(s): Kay, R.H. and Knaack, L. (2009)
“Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS), “permit students to answer digitally-displayed multiple choice questions using a remote control” (Kay et al., 2009, p. 1). One of the suggested benefits of clickers (or ARS) is that they allows teachers to gauge in real-time whether students are grasping the content of a lesson, and make timely adjustments to their lesson when necessary. This study investigated student attitudes towards ARS in Ontario secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 963 times.
Secondary Students’ Perceptions of School RulesAuthor(s): Raby, R. and Domitrek, J. (2007)
This study examined how secondary students in southern Ontario perceive and engage with their school’s code of conduct. In particular, the researchers were interested in exploring students’ opinions on specific rules, when they might accept them and when they might challenge or resist them.

This document has been viewed 631 times.
Sexual Health Education Among Teens New to CanadaAuthor(s): Salehi, R. and Flicker, S. and the Toronto Teen Survey Team. (2010)
This research article describes part of a larger study that explored the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. Specifically, this article investigates the factors that influence teens’ access to sexual health education with a focus on newcomers to Canada.

This document has been viewed 663 times.
Sexual Health Topics: What Teens Want to KnowAuthor(s): Causarano, N.; Pole, J. D.; Flicker S. & Toronto Teen Survey Team (2012)
This research article describes one part of a larger study that investigated the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. It also explores the relationship between religion and teenagers’ exposure to, and desire to, learn more about various sexual health topics including sexually transmitted infections and birth control options.

This document has been viewed 871 times.
Special Education Programming: Principal’s Report on Their Leadership Role(s) in Special Education Programming and Their Professional Development NeedsAuthor(s): Zaretsky, L., Moreau, L., and Faircloth, S. (2008)
This study examined principal’s perceptions of what it means to provide leadership in special education: how they believe they demonstrate this leadership in their schools, how well they believe they are prepared to engage in these roles, and their perceived professional development needs in this area.

This document has been viewed 881 times.
Student Motivation to Learn Core FrenchAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2010)
This study investigated the motivation of students born in Canada (and whose first language was English) to learn French, compared with Allophone students (students whose first language was neither French nor English) and who were born outside of Canada. Specifically, this study compared the motivation of Allophones who began learning French in grade 9 after coming to Canada, to Canadian-born students who began learning French in grade 4.

This document has been viewed 899 times.
Supporting Aboriginal Educators in Pre-service Training Programs and in their Careers as TeachersAuthor(s): Kitchen, J., Cherubini, L., Trudeau, L., Hodson, J. (2010)
This research explored the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers in both mainstream and native teacher education programs in Ontario. These early-career teachers from the Mohawk, Anishinabe and Métis groups reflected upon the challenges they encountered during their teacher preparation courses and first years of teaching. Specifically, this research identified the need to design current teacher education programs that value the individual and cultural identities of Aboriginal teacher candidates.

This document has been viewed 1,787 times.
The complexities of secondary school reform over timeAuthor(s): Hargreaves, A., Goodson, I. (2006)
This is a 5-year Spencer Foundation-funded longitudinal project that examines educational change over time (1970s, 1980s, and 1990s) by exploring the experiences of teachers and administrators who worked in eight secondary schools in the United States and Canada within these periods.

This document has been viewed 945 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 1,066 times.
The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Development of Secondary School YouthAuthor(s): Hands, C. (2008)
While many Ontario schools include character development and citizenship education as part of their curriculum, these topics have traditionally been taught to students in classrooms within the boundaries of schools. This research, on the other hand, investigated a character education program in one school that involved school-community partnerships.

This document has been viewed 1,035 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,275 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): van Barneveld, C. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,582 times.
What Factors Impact Student Enrollment in Physical Education Classes?Author(s): Hobin E.P., Leatherdale S., Manske S., Burkhalter R.J., & Woodruff, S.J. (2010)
While it is generally believed that regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, the amount of time teenagers spend being physically active can vary greatly. This study compared the enrollment rates of students in physical education (PE) courses in secondary schools across Ontario and the factors that impact this enrollment.

This document has been viewed 884 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada?Author(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

This document has been viewed 1,123 times.