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Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,117 times.
Community Involvement in Educational PolicyAuthor(s): Sue Winton (2010)
People for Education (PFE) is a parent-led, not-for-profit organization in Ontario that encourages public citizens to become involved in education issues in their communities. This study examined data from a series of public focus groups hosted by People for Education from 2008 to 2010. Specifically, the researcher focussed on understanding the public’s vision for education in Ontario, and how community-based policy dialogues (conversations) can influence community engagement in educational policy.

This document has been viewed 862 times.
Drawing on Children’s “Sense of Place” – The Starting Point for Teaching Social Studies and GeographyAuthor(s): David Hutchison
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Elementary school children now and then report that what they learn in school
sometimes seems disconnected from “real life” as they personally experience it
outside of school. Unfortunately, children tend to assume that subject learning that
doesn’t feel real to them isn’t real, or that its relevance ends when the school day is
over. This is a common problem in many subject areas, especially social studies and
geography. How can we make the study of “place” relevant and real to children?
Would the social studies curriculum be strengthened if it took account of the ways
in which children derive meaning and value from the real-life physical environments
that are familiar to them?"

This document has been viewed 1,338 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

This document has been viewed 1,043 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. & Ladky, M. (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

This document has been viewed 885 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Pamela Rose Toulouse
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,219 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 811 times.
The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Development of Secondary School YouthAuthor(s): Catherine Hands (2008)
While many Ontario schools include character development and citizenship education as part of their curriculum, these topics have traditionally been taught to students in classrooms within the boundaries of schools. This research, on the other hand, investigated a character education program in one school that involved school-community partnerships.

This document has been viewed 1,020 times.