Search Results

Preschool Predictors of Later Reading Comprehension AbilityAuthor(s): Hjetland, H. N., Brinchmann, E. I., Scherer, R., Melby‐Lervag, M. (2017)
The development of reading comprehension skills begins in childhood, and is essential for school and work success. The main outcomes assessed in the review are potential preschool predictors of later reading comprehension skills; 1) decoding (i.e. le er knowledge and phonological awareness); 2) linguistic comprehension (i.e. vocabulary and grammar); and 3) domain‐general cognitive skills (i.e. memory and nonverbal intelligence).

Viewed 17 times.
Academic Interventions for Elementary and Middle School Students with Low SESAuthor(s): Dietrichson, J., Bog, M., Filges, T., & Klint Jorgensen A. M. (2017)
This research summary was developed by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB), outlining a 2017 systematic review that examined the current literature to better understand what types of interventions can be implemented to increase standardized test scores in reading and mathematics of low SES students in elementary and middle school.

Viewed 85 times.
Training Partners in Augmentative and Alternative CommunicationAuthor(s): Shire, S. and Jones, N. (2015)
Augmentative and assistive communication provides individuals with tools and aids to participate in a variety of interactions and activities. This study found that...

Viewed 303 times.
Cross-language activation of phonology in young bilingual readersAuthor(s): Jared, D., Cormier, P., Levy, B. and Wade-Woolley, L. (2012)
This study investigated the extent to which FI students whose first language is English identify and process words in both English and French during reading. Specifically the researchers explored whether students simultaneously learning two languages that share the same alphabet mentally store and retrieve words through a language specific system—French only or English only, or whether students posses a larger lexicon where their knowledge of both French and English words is invoked during the reading process.

Viewed 596 times.
Using a Professional Learning Community to Support Multimodal LiteraciesAuthor(s): Lotherington, H., Paige, H. and Holland-Spencer, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy instruction is under pressure, being pushed towards screen-based, digitally networked environments, while simultaneously adhering to print- based reading and writing practices. Teachers are pulled in opposing directions as literacy is applied to an expanding grey area of evolving texts that do not fit comfortably within conventional school curricular expectations and assessments. How can teachers change their literacy teaching practices to incorporate integrated pedagogical approaches while still ensuring student success?

Viewed 1,016 times.
Assessing Text Difficulty for StudentsAuthor(s): Murphy, S. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores three key kinds of knowledge that may help teachers arrive at more informed and defensible judgments about the likelihood of a text’s readability for children:
1. knowledge about the reader’s characteristics and the reading task
2. knowledge about the surface features of a text
3.knowledge about the deeper features of texts and the modalities represented in the text.

Viewed 1,355 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

Viewed 1,086 times.
Promoting Curriculum Access in Children and Youth with Reading DisabiliitesAuthor(s): Martinussen, R.
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

Viewed 897 times.
Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): Kim J. S. & Quinn, D. M. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

Viewed 887 times.
Inclusion in French ClassroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K. (2008)
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

Viewed 777 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. & Ladky, M. (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

Viewed 943 times.
Program In Brief: Empower Reading ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB
The Empower™ Reading program is designed to teach word identification skills and decoding strategies and to promote the effective use of these strategies. Applying these strategies effectively, the student can develop the basic skills needed for independent reading for meaning, information, or pleasure. The program focuses on 5 strategies: Sounding Out strategy, Rhyming strategy, Peeling Off strategy, Vowel Alert strategy, and SPY strategy, embedded in a metacognitive frame work.

Viewed 3,013 times.
Examining Race Representation in an Ontario Secondary Social Science TextbookAuthor(s): Rezai-Rashti, G.M. and McCarthy, C. (2008)
This study investigates the representations of race, multiculturalism, and anti-racism in one secondary social sciences textbook used in Ontario schools. In particular, the researchers were interested in examining how Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents for social sciences were translated into supporting textbooks by publishers.

Viewed 1,253 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Irving, H., Allison, K. and Dwyer, J. (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


Viewed 848 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

Viewed 1,163 times.
Poetry: A Powerful Medium for Literacy and Technology DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hughes, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of poetry and technology:

"Traditional notions of literacy were once related more or less exclusively to competence
in reading and writing. We have expanded these notions to include usage and
comprehension skills in speaking, listening, viewing, and representing – by which we
mean communicating through a variety of media, including visual art, drama, and
multimedia performances. In this context, our definition of literacy extends to
fluency in reading and creating electronic media. In a time when the focus is on
improving literacy, what role might poetry, a genre that is often marginalized in the
English language arts classroom, play in literacy development? How can poetry be
taught in ways that engage students, so that we can tap into its literacy-enhancing
power?"

Viewed 1,289 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

Viewed 1,571 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Cornford, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

Viewed 1,389 times.
Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the CurriculumAuthor(s): Brett, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"While the Internet is now the number one information source for both children and adults, research is
showing that online reading does differ importantly from print-based reading (Coiro & Dobler, 2007;
Coiro, 2007)...."

Viewed 1,441 times.
Effective Reading Programs for All Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Chambers, B., Cheung, A., & Davis, S. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of elementary
reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that instructional process programs designed to change daily teaching practices had substantially greater research
support than programs that focused on curriculum or technology alone. "

Viewed 1,649 times.
Effective Reading Programs for Struggling Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Davis, S., & Madden, N. A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of remedial reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that the most effective strategy for remedial readers was an initial focus on improving classroom instruction methods, followed by one‐on‐one tutoring with an emphasis on phonics for students who continued to struggle."

Viewed 2,452 times.
Programs in Brief: Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)Author(s): The PALS program was developed by the Kennedy Centre for Human Development at Vanderbilt University.
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) program. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"PALS is a systematic class‐wide reading program for students in
kindergarten to grade 6. PALS builds reading fluency and
comprehension skills through a set of activities that students are
engaged in for 35 – 45 minute sessions, 3 – 4 times a week. The
classroom teacher provides the initial lesson followed by a
prescribed lesson with materials provided . This is followed by
students working in pairs to practice and reinforce the skills
taught."

Viewed 2,039 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Craig, K., Bell, D.& Leschied, A. (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

Viewed 1,631 times.
What ECE Teachers Think About Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood EducationAuthor(s): Wood, E., Specht, J., Willoughby, T. & Mueller, J. (2008)
This research study examined the perceptions of early childhood educators regarding integrating computer technology into pre-school classrooms. Specifically, this research focused on educators’ perceived advantages and disadvantages of such computer use and the barriers and supports that exist for pre-school educators in teaching computer technology curricula.

Viewed 1,394 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Flynn, R., Marquis, R., Paquet, M., Peeke, L. & Aubry, T. (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

Viewed 1,171 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

Viewed 1,270 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However, the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

Viewed 1,792 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Klein, P. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics. It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

Viewed 1,444 times.
Early Identification and Intervention for At-Risk Readers in French ImmersionAuthor(s): Wise, N., Chen, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children who experience difficulty in learning to read often remain poor readers
in later years. An unfortunate cycle ensues, in that the more frustration these
children experience, the more disinterested they become in reading. Abundant
evidence links early identification of reading problems to constructive interventions
and improved student achievement."

Viewed 1,333 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

Viewed 1,503 times.
Internet Safety in SchoolsAuthor(s): Barnett, J. (2005)
This study investigated internet safety within Southern Ontario schools. Specifically, the researcher explores whether preservice teachers believe their students are involved in unsafe internet practices and whether schools are being sufficiently proactive about on-line student safety.

Viewed 1,207 times.
Adolescent Stress and Coping StrategiesAuthor(s): Montgomery, C.
Academic performance has become one of the most prevalent stressors in western society for adolescents, and certain coping strategies can predict high school dropout (Hess & Copeland, 2001). However, studies on adolescent stress and coping present divergent causes of adolescent stress related to the environment. Moreover, results differ in terms of the way adolescents regulate their stress and coping. This literature review examines the scientific literature on the theme of adolescent stress and coping between 1997 and present and will answer the following questions in order to better understand high school dropout:
Question 1: What are the main causes of adolescents’ environmental stress?
Question 2: How do adolescents regulate their stress and coping?

Viewed 1,957 times.
Try Literacy Tutoring FirstAuthor(s): Berrill, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy tutoring:

"In everyday teaching practice, teachers are on the move, circulating to see who needs help and pausing to give individualized, focused support. Yet, some children need significantly more time than teachers with responsibilities to the whole class can provide. Teachers know who these children are and find various ways to support their learning, from pairing them with more able peers and structuring guided reading activities, to providing differentiated instruction with materials for different ability levels. However, some children need still more assistance, both in terms of the frequency and the duration of the support they require. What else can teachers do?"

Viewed 1,023 times.
Word Study Instruction: Enhancing Reading ComprehensionAuthor(s): Scott, R. M. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Word study instruction can provide students with vital knowledge which they can then apply to the task of comprehending text. The nature of word study will vary with the developmental needs of students and the demands of the text. A teacher’s knowledge of the structure of English is an important factor in optimizing word study instruction; equally vital is the ability to present the study of spelling, vocabulary and word choice in a manner that engages students and entices them to explore words on a deeper level."

Viewed 1,316 times.
The Voice of Text-to-Speech Technology: One Possible Solution for Struggling ReadersAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2011)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Classroom and special education teachers use many strategies to help students
read at grade level. But what do we do for children...for whom those
strategies are not effective? Assistive technology – specifically text-to-speech
technology (TTST) – offers a possible solution."

Viewed 1,800 times.
Restorative justice in an Ontario public schoolAuthor(s): Reimer, K. (2011)
This qualitative case study explores the implementation of restorative justice in one Ontario Public School. Restorative justice
is a philosophy and process for dealing with harmful behaviour, viewing such behaviour as a violation of relationships, not
rules.

Viewed 955 times.
After-School Literacy Activities and Performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

Viewed 1,292 times.
Emotional Geographies of TeachingAuthor(s): Hargreaves, A. (2008)
Emotional geographies define the relationships of closeness and distance we have with ourselves, with others and the world around us. It is a new concept in education and social research.

Building on 50 interviews with elementary and secondary school teachers, foundations for five forms of emotional geography and their consequences are formed:
Socio-cultural Moral Professional Physical and, Political

Viewed 1,264 times.