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Factors related to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents seeking mental health servicesAuthor(s): Stewart, S., Baiden, P. and Theall-Honey, L. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study examined the frequency of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents with mental health needs and identified specific factors related to NSSI. Data on 2,013 adolescents were gathered from the Ontario Mental Health Reporting System using the Resident Assessment Instrument—Mental Health (RAI-MH). The researchers found increased NSSI in adolescents with mood or personality disorders, histories of abuse, substance use and intentional misuse of prescription medication, and higher rates of NSSI in females. The researchers highlighted the importance of novel findings in regards to intentional misuse of prescription medications in this population.

This document has been viewed 275 times.
Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): Cairney, J., Kwan, M.Y.W., Velduizen, S., Hay, J., Bray, S.R., & Faught, B.E. (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 964 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

This document has been viewed 729 times.
Impact of the Balanced School Day on Students and SchoolsAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2012)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the impact of a "balanced school day". You can also view this, and other BLAMs, at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

"The “balanced school day” schedule (BSD, also known as “balanced day schedule”) refers to the reorganization from a traditional school day schedule with two short breaks for recess and one longer break for lunch, to a schedule that has three academic periods (usually 100 minutes in length) separated by two longer breaks (usually 40 to 45 minutes) that combine food and physical activity..."

This document has been viewed 1,316 times.
Implementing Health Promotion Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Pearson, M., Chilton, R., Wyatt, K., Abraham, C., Ford, T., Woods, H., and Anderson, R. (2015)
This summary was developed by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB). The KNSWB is a project of the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER).

Schools have long been seen as a primary source of health promotion programs for children. Current health promotion practices in schools include such topics as: alcohol consumption, drug use, smoking, obesity, physical activity, sex and relationship education, and well‐being. Recent reviews suggest that...

This document has been viewed 80 times.
Increasing peer resistance skills through a school-based interventionAuthor(s): Wolfe, D., Crooks, C., Chiodo, D., Hughes, R., Ellis, W. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The Fourth R is an evidence based intervention in schools that teaches youth how to have healthy relationships. Students who participate in the program learn strategies that can reduce their likelihood of engaging in peer pressure scenarios (when pressured to use drugs or alcohol, have unsafe sex, or witness peer violence perpetration at a higher rate).

This document has been viewed 238 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Pamela Rose Toulouse
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,219 times.
Link between non-suicidal self-injury & suicidal behavioursAuthor(s): Hamza, C., Stewart, S., Willoughby, T. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

NSSI and suicidal behaviours are different behaviours that often co-occur. Little attention has been given to why these behaviours are linked. Since NSSI is considered one of the most significant risk factor for suicidal behaviours, it is crucial to examine the mechanism through which this occurs. Three theories have been proposed to explain the link between NSSI and suicidal behaviours and, in this summary, an integrated model of these theories is introduced.

This document has been viewed 157 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): Fedewa, A. & Soyeon, A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

This document has been viewed 613 times.
Poor peer & family relationships predict dating violence in adolescent girlsAuthor(s): Chiodo, D., Crooks, C.V., Wolfe, D.A., McIsaac, C., Hughs, R., and Jaffe, P.G. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The findings from this study underscore the importance of developing early prevention programming to enhance adolescent feelings of school connectedness, positive school attitudes, and engaging in personal control to reduce the likelihood of involvement in dating violence.

This document has been viewed 252 times.
Preventing Alcohol Use Problems Among Aboriginal YouthAuthor(s): Rawana J.S and Ames M.E. (2011)
This summary was produced by EENet. For more information on EENet and access to other summaries, please visit http://eenet.ca/

Youth who experiment with alcohol may be at risk of future alcohol use problems. Studies and trends show that Aboriginal youth may be at an even greater risk of developing such alcohol and drug use problems. For all teens, certain risk factors may worsen their vulnerability to developing alcohol disorders. Likewise, certain protective factors ward off alcohol dependence amongst teens. This study examines the protective factors of alcohol use among off-reserve Canadian Aboriginal youth.

This document has been viewed 1,024 times.
Programs in Brief: Positive Action® ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST, HWDSB (2013)
This "Programs in Brief" was developed by the E-BEST team at the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. You can view this and other summaries at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/about/research/

Positive Action® is a social and emotional learning (SEL) program
focused on promoting social skills and personal growth in students.

This document has been viewed 151 times.
School Injury Among Ottawa-Area StudentsAuthor(s): Josse, J., Mackay M., Osmond M. & Macpherson, A. (2009)
This study investigated the factors that influence the likelihood that a student will become injured at school, and identified trends surrounding the nature of injuries and the locations where injuries are likely to occur.

This document has been viewed 839 times.
School-based violence prevention program offers a protective impact for youth with maltreatment historiesAuthor(s): Crooks, C., Scott, K., Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2011)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This research highlights the benefits of an inexpensive school-based violence prevention program. This program demonstrates support for the reduction of dating violence among students and the protective effect for maltreated youth, lowering their likelihood of engaging in violent delinquency. These results also suggest that a short-term violence prevention program can have significant and meaningful long-term results.

This document has been viewed 286 times.
Student Teacher Stress and Physical ActivityAuthor(s): Cameron Montgomery; Les MacFarlane; David Trumpower; Rebecca Lloyd (2012)
Student teachers (pre-service teachers who are completing teaching practicums within schools) can be under significant stress as they attempt to prove their skills and adapt to their supervisor’s style, all while undergoing constant evaluation. Some studies have suggested that these stressors may leave student teachers feeling burnt out before their career even begins. Recent studies have identified physical activity as a way to cope with stress, although research examining the relationship between student teacher stress and exercise has remain limited.

The purpose of this study was to identify the main sources of student teacher stress and investigate the relationship between levels of stress and participation in physical activity. Stress, for the purpose of this study, is defined as tension that arises when the demands of one’s surroundings exceeds one’s personal coping strategies.

This document has been viewed 988 times.
Supporting Students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): An Intervention ModelAuthor(s): Missiuna, C., Pollock, N., Campbell, W. N., Bennett, S., Hecimovich, C., Gaines, R., DeCola, C., Cairney, J., Russell, D and Molinaro, E. (2012)
Many students in Ontario’s public schools receive occupational therapy services to meet a variety of needs. Often, this involves a qualified occupational therapist (OT) working one-on-one with a student within the school setting. Unfortunately, there are not enough OTs available to work with all of the students who need support, and students can wait between 1 to 2 years on a waitlist before receiving OT service (Deloitte & Touche, 2010).

Partnering for Change (P4C) is an innovative service delivery intervention model for students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).In the P4C intervention model, OTs work with classroom teachers and parents to build their capacity in supporting students’ occupational therapy needs. For example, OTs will coach parents and teachers to identify and implement strategies to improve students’ functioning at school.

This document has been viewed 1,021 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Irving, H., Allison, K. and Dwyer, J. (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 796 times.