KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

Contextual Learning at Summer CampAuthor(s): Fine, S. (2005)
This research explores how contexts linked to residential outdoor experiences (ROE) contribute to significant learning. It addresses the need for the reconsideration and restoration of routine outdoor programs in Ontario schools and teacher training in this area.

This document has been viewed 932 times.
Impact of the Balanced School Day on Students and SchoolsAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2012)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the impact of a "balanced school day". You can also view this, and other BLAMs, at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

"The “balanced school day” schedule (BSD, also known as “balanced day schedule”) refers to the reorganization from a traditional school day schedule with two short breaks for recess and one longer break for lunch, to a schedule that has three academic periods (usually 100 minutes in length) separated by two longer breaks (usually 40 to 45 minutes) that combine food and physical activity..."

This document has been viewed 1,391 times.
Is it Better to Have Generalist or Specialist Teachers Teach Physical Education in Elementary Schools?Author(s): Faulkner, G., Dwyer; J., Irving, H., Allison, K., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J. (2008)
This research investigated whether Physical Education (PE) specialist teachers delivered more PE lessons and provide increased opportunities for moderate and vigorous physical activity than generalist teachers. The researchers also examined whether specialist or generalist PE teachers had any impact on perceptions of Physical activity within the broader school, and whether either teacher had an impact on the engagement of students in extracurricular physical activities, such as intramural sports, offered within a school.

This document has been viewed 937 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): Fedewa, A. & Soyeon, A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

This document has been viewed 655 times.
Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Dwyer, J., Kenneth, A., LeMoine, K., Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J., and Lysy, D. (2008)
The role of schools in providing opportunities for physical activity has become a topic of importance, as previous studies in Canada report both an increase in childhood obesity and a decrease in children’s daily physical activity. This study examines the physical activity programs offered in Ontario schools and the barriers that educators believe exist to providing these programs.

This document has been viewed 806 times.
School Injury Among Ottawa-Area StudentsAuthor(s): Josse, J., Mackay M., Osmond M. & Macpherson, A. (2009)
This study investigated the factors that influence the likelihood that a student will become injured at school, and identified trends surrounding the nature of injuries and the locations where injuries are likely to occur.

This document has been viewed 852 times.
Student Teacher Stress and Physical ActivityAuthor(s): Montgomery, C., MacFarlane, L., Trumpower, D., Lloyd, R. (2012)
Student teachers (pre-service teachers who are completing teaching practicums within schools) can be under significant stress as they attempt to prove their skills and adapt to their supervisor’s style, all while undergoing constant evaluation. Some studies have suggested that these stressors may leave student teachers feeling burnt out before their career even begins. Recent studies have identified physical activity as a way to cope with stress, although research examining the relationship between student teacher stress and exercise has remain limited.

The purpose of this study was to identify the main sources of student teacher stress and investigate the relationship between levels of stress and participation in physical activity. Stress, for the purpose of this study, is defined as tension that arises when the demands of one’s surroundings exceeds one’s personal coping strategies.

This document has been viewed 999 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Irving, H., Allison, K. and Dwyer, J. (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 807 times.
What Factors Impact Student Enrollment in Physical Education Classes?Author(s): Hobin E.P., Leatherdale S., Manske S., Burkhalter R.J., & Woodruff, S.J. (2010)
While it is generally believed that regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, the amount of time teenagers spend being physically active can vary greatly. This study compared the enrollment rates of students in physical education (PE) courses in secondary schools across Ontario and the factors that impact this enrollment.

This document has been viewed 883 times.