KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Shaljan Areepattamannil; John G. Freeman (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

This document has been viewed 964 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Xitao Fan; Michael Chen (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,002 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Shelley Stagg Peterson; Mary Ladky (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

This document has been viewed 874 times.
Helping children with their schooling: A comparison of parents of children with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Author(s): Rogers M.A.; Wiener, J.; Marton, I; Tannock, R.
It is often reported by teachers and parents that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have problems in school: they are less engaged, have lower grades, lower graduation rates and require more attention from teachers. Children with ADHD also have similar problems outside the classroom. These problems are not surprising because the symptoms associated with ADHD make learning more difficult. While there is research that describes how and why parents of children without ADHD are involved in their children’s learning, and that this involvement benefits the children, there is little information about parental involvement in the schooling of children with ADHD. This study explored parental involvement in the learning of students with ADHD.

This document has been viewed 1,186 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hayley A. Hamilton, Lysandra Marshall, Joanna A. Rummens, Haile Fenta, Laura Simich
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' literacy knowledge and parental involvementAuthor(s): Jacqueline Lynch (2010)
This study examined whether there were differences in kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' print literacy
knowledge and about parental involvement in children's literacy events based on the socio-economic status (SES) of children's families.

This document has been viewed 929 times.
Monocultural to Multicultural: Parent PerceptionsAuthor(s): Cynthia Levine-Rasky
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on parent perceptions on multiculturalism:

"Cynthia Levine-Rasky of Queen’s University conducted a study of one elementary public school where, as a result of an increase to the immigrant population in the elementary school’s catchment area, a significant shift from being predominantly white and middle class to a more diverse student body occurred."

This document has been viewed 906 times.
Parent EngagementAuthor(s): Debbie Pushor
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of parent engagement:

"A wealth of research concludes that students are more likely to be successful when their parents are
engaged in their education....In light of this evidence, meaningful relationships that enhance parents’ opportunities to make important
contributions to student learning are vital to the work of teachers."

This document has been viewed 863 times.
Successful practices for immigrant parent involvement: An Ontario perspective Author(s): Mary Ladky; Shelly Stagg (2007)
This study brings together the perspectives of 21 immigrant parents who speak eight different languages
and have been in Canada less than six years with those of 61 teachers and 32 principals who work in
schools with English as a second language (ESL) populations of 20% or greater who have been recognized
as successfully involving immigrant parents in their children's schooling.

This document has been viewed 1,278 times.
Training Partners in Augmentative and Alternative CommunicationAuthor(s): Stephanie Shire and Nancy Jones (2015)
Augmentative and assistive communication provides individuals with tools and aids to participate in a variety of interactions and activities. This study found that...

This document has been viewed 38 times.
What parents expect from ED mental health services for youthAuthor(s): Paula Cloutier; Allison Kennedy; Heather Maysenhoelder; Elizabeth J. Glennie; Mario Cappelli; Clare Gray (2010)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

Many youth go to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a variety of mental health issues. A child’s parents or caregivers
are often a clinician’s main source of information about the youth, their history, and the crisis situation. In this way, caregivers’
perceptions can play a huge role in the way the clinician administers care for the youth. The caregiver also represents a second set of
expectations that need to be met. However, there is no standardized way of getting information from caregivers. This study
examines parental expectations for ED mental health services for youth.

This document has been viewed 878 times.