Search Results

Training Partners in Augmentative and Alternative CommunicationAuthor(s): Shire, S. and Jones, N. (2015)
Augmentative and assistive communication provides individuals with tools and aids to participate in a variety of interactions and activities. This study found that...

Viewed 303 times.
Math that feels good: A model for math education reformAuthor(s): Gadanidis, G., Borba, M., Hughes, J., Lacerda, H.D., Namukasa, I. (2016)
This summary was prepared by George Gadanidis, Janette Hughes and Immaculate Namukasa who are co-investigators on a 2016-2019 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Grant on Aesthetic Experiences for Young Mathematicians & their Teachers.

"Over the last ten years...we have been working in K-8 schools in Ontario and in Rio Claro, Brazil, designing experiences that offer students (and their teachers and parents) the pleasure of math surprise and insight. We have also been developing an effective model of math education reform that addresses teachers' interests and needs. Working with teachers we ask what they need help with in their math teaching. For example, when three grade 3 teachers in a school in Whitby told us they were looking for new ideas for teaching "area representations of fractions", we co-designed the activity below to (a) cover the grade 3 curriculum, but (b) also to offer a math surprise...."

Viewed 1,456 times.
Effectiveness of Suicide Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Katz, C., Bolton, S., Katz, L., Isaak, C., Tilston-Jones, T., and Sareen, J. (2013)
his research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2013 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by
Katz, Bolton, Katz, Isaak, Tilston-Jones and Sareen.

http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 318 times.
Effective Elements of Suicide Prevention programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Balaguru, V, Sharma, J, Waheed, W. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2012 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by Balaguru, Sharma and Waheed.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 306 times.
Exploring the Power of Growing PatternsAuthor(s): Beatty, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores how teachers can present and discuss growing patterns to introduce students to functions, an integral part of algebraic thinking.

Viewed 1,088 times.
Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): McQuirter Scott, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

Viewed 1,345 times.
Making Math Children Will LoveAuthor(s): Colgan, L. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Evidence suggests that learning is energized by affect. We, as educators, must turn our attention to resources and strategies that improve students’ relationships with mathematics content and processes and pique students’ motivation, emotion, interest and attention.

Viewed 1,009 times.
Cultivating Student Engagement Through Interactive Art StrategiesAuthor(s): Cho, C.; Vitale, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

While we know that engaged students are more invested in their learning, the arts remain an underutilized strategy for student engagement. The reality is that many teachers lack confidence teaching both visual arts and music. We feel strongly that the generalist teacher can develop a repertoire of strategies – such as those discussed here – to increase their confidence and provide authentic and sincere arts-based experiences for learners.

Viewed 1,151 times.
The Inclusion of English Language Learners in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study examined French as a Second Language teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about the inclusion of English Language Learner (ELL) students in French as an Official Second Language (FSOL) classes.

Viewed 829 times.
The Effects of Short Bilingual Exchange ProgramsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2011)
This research examined the impact of participating in a short term bilingual exchange (for a period of less than two weeks), 6 to10 years after the exchange. Specifically, the researcher examined the following three questions: 1) What are the long-term linguistic outcomes for exchange participants as identified years following their exchange experience?; 2) What are the long-term non-linguistic outcomes (participation in other program opportunities, career choice) for exchange participants as identified years following their exchange experience?, and 3) How do former exchange participants link the above outcomes to the exchange experience?

Viewed 595 times.
Adolescent Attitudes Towards SchizophreniaAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Irving, H., Paglia-Boak, A., and Adalf, E. (2010)
This study investigated adolescent knowledge of schizophrenia and their attitudes towards persons with the disorder. This study aimed to understand the how knowledge about schizophrenia is associated with social distancing behavior (or behaving in a way to not wanting to associate with people with schizophrenia).

Viewed 687 times.
Parents' experiences seeking help for their children with mental health issuesAuthor(s): Reid, G., Cunningham, C., Tobon, J. and Evans, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

Having families involved with multiple mental health agencies can lead to greater system costs, increased burdens on families,
insufficient treatment, or unequal distribution of services. Administrators and policymakers may find this study interesting in order to re-evaluate the structure and service model of the mental health system.

Viewed 613 times.
What do teen immigrants say about drug addition?Author(s): Hamilton, H., Mann, R. and Noh, S. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

This study looks at what stigmas teens have against drug addiction and what factors lead to these attitudes. Educators may be interested in these findings because most drug prevention programs make use of stigmas and direct their anti-drug messages at young teens.

Viewed 640 times.
Critical Literacy Instruction and Primary StudentsAuthor(s): MacDonald, J., Halvorsen, M. and Wilcox, C. (2009)
This action research study examined the impact of critical literacy instruction on primary students’ ability to respond critically to text. Specifically, the researchers explored primary students’ understanding of voice (which character’s message is most prominently portrayed); voiceless (which character’s message is marginalized ); the voiceless perspective (what a character might say); and the author’s message (what meanings and values does the text convey).

Viewed 1,259 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

Viewed 867 times.
Cross-language activation of phonology in young bilingual readersAuthor(s): Jared, D., Cormier, P., Levy, B. and Wade-Woolley, L. (2012)
This study investigated the extent to which FI students whose first language is English identify and process words in both English and French during reading. Specifically the researchers explored whether students simultaneously learning two languages that share the same alphabet mentally store and retrieve words through a language specific system—French only or English only, or whether students posses a larger lexicon where their knowledge of both French and English words is invoked during the reading process.

Viewed 596 times.
Volunteer Youth Exchange Programs and Second Language LearningAuthor(s): Arnott, S. and Mady, C. (2012)
Second language exchange programs provide students with an opportunity to practice their language skills in an authentic setting. This study examined the impact of a Volunteer Youth Exchange (VYE) program on participants’ motivation to learn a second language (French or English).

Specifically, the researchers focused on the following two research questions: 1) How do the participants’ motivation to learn a second language (L2) and their self-assessment of their L2 compare pre and post volunteer experience?, and 2) What aspects of the volunteer experience may have influenced VYE participants’ willingness to communicate in their second language?

Viewed 1,027 times.
Perspectives on the Afrocentric School: Voices of Black YouthAuthor(s): Gordon, M. and Zinga, D. (2012)
In 2009 the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) opened the first black-focused or africentric school in Ontario. This study explored the opinions of black youth regarding the proposal of a black-focused school. Specifically the research aimed to explore black youths’ ideas about whether a black-focused school would address the issue of academic disengagement amongst black students.

Viewed 642 times.
Using Theatre to Examine Social Issues and Change School CultureAuthor(s): Gallagher, G. and Service, I. (2010)
This study examines the use of theatre to stimulate discussions about social issues and changes to school culture.The play tells the story of one boy’s struggle to overcome economic hardship, and the schools selected to show the play were chosen because of their large enrolments of students from low socio-economic backgrounds. The play was followed up with teacher professional development workshops to support the implementation of the overall program which was designed to help schools reduce the effects of poverty on students.

Viewed 5,843 times.
The Impact of Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” Program on Students’ Oral HealthAuthor(s): Muirhead, V. and Lawrence, H. (2011)
While many school-based oral health initiatives have targeted specific behaviors such as tooth brushing, this study examined the impact of the broader Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” initiative on the oral health of students. Launched in 2006, this program focuses on broader issues of health promotion including healthy eating, substance use, physical activity, and personal safety amongst others.

Viewed 613 times.
The relationship between report cards and EQAO scores.Author(s): Ross, J. and Kostuch, L. (2011)
This study examined the relationship between report card grades and student scores on the Educational Quality and Assessment Office (EQAO) tests in grades 3 and 6 for the 2007-2009 school years.
More specifically, this study was guided by three main research questions:
a) What is the level of agreement between report card grades and EQAO scores?
b) Do factors such as gender, subject area, student achievement, or grade level impact the level of agreement between these two indicators student achievement?
c) How well do report card grades predict the likelihood of success on the standardized assessments?

Viewed 591 times.
Students report their perception of, and satisfaction with, school-based sexual health educationAuthor(s): Meaney, G., Rye, B.J., Wood, E. and Soloviena, E. (2009)
This study investigated high school graduates’ perceptions of and satisfaction with their school-based sexual health education. In particular, the researchers were interested in how gender and the type of school attended (public or Catholic) impacted graduates’ views of their sexual health education.

Viewed 675 times.
The Impact of Interdisciplinary Planning on Classroom Practice: Perceptions of Teachers and AdministratorsAuthor(s): Racknor, W. and Drake, S. (2011)
In 2008, the Bluewater District School Board in Ontario began to use interdisciplinary planning with junior kindergarten (JK) to grade 6 teachers, JK to grade 8 administrators, and teachers from two high schools. In this approach, teachers are intended to work in collaborative teams to develop interdisciplinary units based on provincial curriculum standards. The units developed by these teams are structured around “big ideas” such as change and interdependence and focused on developing higher order thinking skills such as problem solving, communication, and critical literacy.

This study investigated teacher and administrator perceptions of the impact of these new units on classroom practice.

Viewed 713 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

Viewed 1,084 times.
Performing Poetry: Using Drama to Increase the Comprehension on PoetryAuthor(s): Ferguson, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Poetry can be both challenging and intimidating to teach and learn. But how can teachers teach poetry comprehension without falling into the trap of mechanically dissecting poems for form and “real” meaning? Drama is one strategy, grounded in research, that fosters student comprehension of poetry and allows students to apply comprehension strategies.

Viewed 1,156 times.
Calling Upon Other Language Skills to Enhance Second Language LearningAuthor(s): Mady, C. and Garbati, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

The impact of other languages on students’ target language proficiency and the degree to which they should be used in the second language classroom remain topics of debate. This monograph explores why and how to make use of students’ prior language knowledge in the second language class.

Viewed 992 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

Viewed 1,399 times.
Assessing Text Difficulty for StudentsAuthor(s): Murphy, S. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores three key kinds of knowledge that may help teachers arrive at more informed and defensible judgments about the likelihood of a text’s readability for children:
1. knowledge about the reader’s characteristics and the reading task
2. knowledge about the surface features of a text
3.knowledge about the deeper features of texts and the modalities represented in the text.

Viewed 1,350 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

Viewed 1,085 times.
Sexual Health Topics: What Teens Want to KnowAuthor(s): Causarano, N.; Pole, J. D.; Flicker S. & Toronto Teen Survey Team (2012)
This research article describes one part of a larger study that investigated the sexual health education experiences of a diverse group of urban youth in Ontario. It also explores the relationship between religion and teenagers’ exposure to, and desire to, learn more about various sexual health topics including sexually transmitted infections and birth control options.

Viewed 998 times.
Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): Kim J. S. & Quinn, D. M. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

Viewed 887 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): Fedewa, A. & Soyeon, A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

Viewed 738 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Middle and Secondary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E.; Lake, C.; Groff, C. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 systematic review of different math programs available to middle and secondary teachers by Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., & Groff, C.

Viewed 1,081 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin R. E. & Lake C. (2007)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2007 systematic review of on different math programs available to elementary teachers by Slavin, R. E. , & Lake, C.

Viewed 978 times.
Dropout Prevention and Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Wilson, S. J., Tanner‐Smith, E. E., Lipsey, M. W., Steinka‐Fry, K., & Morrison, J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of dropout prevention programs by Wilson, S. J., Tanner‐Smith, E. E., Lipsey, M. W., Steinka‐Fry, K., & Morrison.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 958 times.
Computer Assisted LearningAuthor(s): Hattie, J. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 summary about computer assisted learning by John Hattie
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 963 times.
Inclusion in French ClassroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K. (2008)
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

Viewed 776 times.
Handling Problematic Situations When Administering the EQAO AssessmentAuthor(s): Childs, R.A., Umezawa, L. (2009)
While instructions are provided to teachers on how to administer large-scale assessments, in some cases strict adherence to these instructions may prove to be problematic for teachers in their dual role as both test supervisor and teacher. This study investigated how grade 3 teachers expect to react when faced with problematic situations while administering the EQAO assessment to their own classroom students. Specifically, the researchers explored what these teachers said they would do when faced with a number of hypothetical situations, and why they would choose a certain course of action.

Viewed 1,164 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. & Ladky, M. (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

Viewed 943 times.
Kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' literacy knowledge and parental involvementAuthor(s): Lynch, J. (2010)
This study examined whether there were differences in kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' print literacy
knowledge and about parental involvement in children's literacy events based on the socio-economic status (SES) of children's families.

Viewed 1,018 times.
Best Practices in Walk-Throughs, an Instructional Supervision Technique, and the Impact on Student AchievementAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2009)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on best practices for walk-throughs as an instructional supervision strategy to increase student acheivement. You can also view this, and other BLAMs, at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

"Overall, the literature summarized in this BLAM, shows that walk-throughs can have a positive impact on student achievement
providing that they are transparent, non-evaluative, focused on an
improvement area and conducted frequently (at least once per
week). Walk-throughs should facilitate open dialogue between
teachers and principals..."

Viewed 1,457 times.
Community Involvement in Educational PolicyAuthor(s): Sue Winton (2010)
People for Education (PFE) is a parent-led, not-for-profit organization in Ontario that encourages public citizens to become involved in education issues in their communities. This study examined data from a series of public focus groups hosted by People for Education from 2008 to 2010. Specifically, the researcher focussed on understanding the public’s vision for education in Ontario, and how community-based policy dialogues (conversations) can influence community engagement in educational policy.

Viewed 924 times.
Supporting Students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): An Intervention ModelAuthor(s): Missiuna, C., Pollock, N., Campbell, W. N., Bennett, S., Hecimovich, C., Gaines, R., DeCola, C., Cairney, J., Russell, D and Molinaro, E. (2012)
Many students in Ontario’s public schools receive occupational therapy services to meet a variety of needs. Often, this involves a qualified occupational therapist (OT) working one-on-one with a student within the school setting. Unfortunately, there are not enough OTs available to work with all of the students who need support, and students can wait between 1 to 2 years on a waitlist before receiving OT service (Deloitte & Touche, 2010).

Partnering for Change (P4C) is an innovative service delivery intervention model for students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).In the P4C intervention model, OTs work with classroom teachers and parents to build their capacity in supporting students’ occupational therapy needs. For example, OTs will coach parents and teachers to identify and implement strategies to improve students’ functioning at school.

Viewed 1,145 times.
Secondary Students’ Attitudes Towards “Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS)Author(s): Kay, R.H. and Knaack, L. (2009)
“Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS), “permit students to answer digitally-displayed multiple choice questions using a remote control” (Kay et al., 2009, p. 1). One of the suggested benefits of clickers (or ARS) is that they allows teachers to gauge in real-time whether students are grasping the content of a lesson, and make timely adjustments to their lesson when necessary. This study investigated student attitudes towards ARS in Ontario secondary schools.

Viewed 1,008 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

Viewed 1,201 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

Viewed 1,163 times.
Supporting Young People with Disabilities in their Transition to Adult Services: Developing Best PracticesAuthor(s): Stewart, D. (2009)
Transitioning from school and youth services to adult services can be a very challenging process for young people with disabilities and their families. This article reports on the Best Practice Project, a joint effort of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, and the Ontario Children’s Rehabilitation
Network. Facilitated by a team of researchers, the project focused on establishing best practice guidelines for the process of transitioning from school and youth services to adult services for young people with physical and developmental disabilities in Ontario.

Viewed 1,226 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

Viewed 1,228 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada?Author(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

Viewed 1,262 times.
Participation at Canadian Universities: A Growing Gender GapAuthor(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2010)
The participation rate of young women at universities has steadily been increasing, with women now more likely to enroll in university than men. For example, in 2005, a 15 percentage point gap existed between the participation rate of women at university compared to men. This research study investigated the factors influencing young people’s decision to attend university and whether these factors are different for men and women.

Viewed 1,307 times.
Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Parekh, G., Killoran, I. and Crawford, C. (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

Viewed 1,161 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Craig, K., Bell, D.& Leschied, A. (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

Viewed 1,630 times.
What Factors Impact Student Enrollment in Physical Education Classes?Author(s): Hobin E.P., Leatherdale S., Manske S., Burkhalter R.J., & Woodruff, S.J. (2010)
While it is generally believed that regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, the amount of time teenagers spend being physically active can vary greatly. This study compared the enrollment rates of students in physical education (PE) courses in secondary schools across Ontario and the factors that impact this enrollment.

Viewed 1,096 times.
Dual-credit programming: The challenges and opportunitiesAuthor(s): Watt-Malcolm, B. (2011)
Dual-credit systems, or the opportunity for secondary students to earn credits at high school and college levels simultaneously (Lekes et al., 2007) is well established in the United States. As part of a larger study that examines secondary school apprenticeships and partnerships, this study investigates the tensions that exist in the implementation of dual credit systems in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia with a specific focus on dual-credit for apprenticeship training.

Viewed 950 times.
Teaching Science as a Process of InquiryAuthor(s): Melville W., Bartley A. & Fazio, X. (2012)
This study investigated the attitudes and experiences of pre-service secondary school science teachers who are learning to teach science as a process of inquiry. The pre-service teachers were enrolled in a full-year science methodology course at an Ontario faculty of education, which aimed to challenge the belief that scientific investigation is only conducted using one universal step-by-step process.


Viewed 1,226 times.
What parents expect from ED mental health services for youthAuthor(s): Cloutier P., Kennedy, A., Maysenhoelder H, Glennie E.J., Cappelli, M. & Gray, C. (2010)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

Many youth go to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a variety of mental health issues. A child’s parents or caregivers
are often a clinician’s main source of information about the youth, their history, and the crisis situation. In this way, caregivers’
perceptions can play a huge role in the way the clinician administers care for the youth. The caregiver also represents a second set of
expectations that need to be met. However, there is no standardized way of getting information from caregivers. This study
examines parental expectations for ED mental health services for youth.

Viewed 937 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Fan, X. & Chen, M. (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 1,077 times.
Gender Stereotypes and Musical InstrumentsAuthor(s): Buttu, S. (2008)
This study investigated the perceptions of girls enrolled in a single-sex school about gender stereotypes in relation to musical instruments. The research study focused on whether stereotypes impact girls’ decisions to play a certain instrument and how girls from an all girl school describe their experiences of playing their instruments in their own school and in co-educational environments such as band camp.

Viewed 932 times.
Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jones, J., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Vilela, T. & Brown, H. (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

Viewed 1,278 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hamilton, H.A., Marshall, L., Rummens, J.A., Fenta, H. & Simich, L. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

Viewed 997 times.
Neighbourhood connectedness can reduce teen drug useAuthor(s): Erickson, P.G., Adlaf, E.M., Harrison, L., Cook, S. & Cousineau, M. (2012)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly
OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Collective Efficacy is a theory that has been shown to explain for patterns in youth crime at the neighbourhood and community level. It suggests that when parents are well connected to their children’s friends and the other people in the neighbourhood, and are willing to intervene for the common good, this decreases the likelihood of youth crime
occurring. This study tested to see if this theory could be applied to predict drug use among adolescents."

Viewed 1,155 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Flynn, R., Marquis, R., Paquet, M., Peeke, L. & Aubry, T. (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

Viewed 1,170 times.
Ensuring Students with Learning Disabilities Have Proper Documentation as they Transition into Post-secondary InstitutionsAuthor(s): Harrison, A.G., Nichols, E., Larochette, A. (2008)
The Ontario Human Rights Code (1990) guarantees students diagnosed with a learning disability (LD) the right to accommodations that meet their academic needs at the post-secondary level (College and University). Not all students, however, arrive equipped with the necessary documentation to guarantee this support. This study investigated the quality of documentation presented by students entering post-secondary institutions in support of their LD and, in so doing, exposes current practices for identifying students (declaring students Exceptional) at the elementary and secondary levels.

Viewed 1,230 times.
Is it Better to Have Generalist or Specialist Teachers Teach Physical Education in Elementary Schools?Author(s): Faulkner, G., Dwyer; J., Irving, H., Allison, K., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J. (2008)
This research investigated whether Physical Education (PE) specialist teachers delivered more PE lessons and provide increased opportunities for moderate and vigorous physical activity than generalist teachers. The researchers also examined whether specialist or generalist PE teachers had any impact on perceptions of Physical activity within the broader school, and whether either teacher had an impact on the engagement of students in extracurricular physical activities, such as intramural sports, offered within a school.

Viewed 966 times.
Islamic Schooling in OntarioAuthor(s): Zine, J. (2004)
Four full-time Islamic schools are the focus of this study on alternative schooling. The objectives of this research were: to identify the role and function of Islamic schooling in a diasporic context; to understand the role of Islamic education in the development of Islamic identity; to examine the Islamization of knowledge and pedagogy in Islamic schools.

This research study also focused on the knowledge production of Islamically-centred education, the teaching strategies and ways of socialization and discipline. These areas are examined to understand the religious and spiritual traditions of Islam in schools.

Viewed 864 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

Viewed 1,270 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Savaria, E. (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

Viewed 1,082 times.
Student Motivation to Learn Core FrenchAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2010)
This study investigated the motivation of students born in Canada (and whose first language was English) to learn French, compared with Allophone students (students whose first language was neither French nor English) and who were born outside of Canada. Specifically, this study compared the motivation of Allophones who began learning French in grade 9 after coming to Canada, to Canadian-born students who began learning French in grade 4.

Viewed 936 times.
Exploring the Use of Literature Across Elementary CurriculumAuthor(s): Pantaleo, S. (2002)
This study investigated the use of literature in elementary classrooms across subject areas. The researcher explored teacher and teacher-librarians’ use of different genres of literature including: realistic fiction (stories about everyday life), non-fiction, fantasy (science fiction, quest stories), poetry, traditional literature (myths, legends, folktales), and historical fiction. The researcher investigated the overall use of these genres by teachers and teacher-librarians and also the use of Canadian literature within each genre.

Viewed 1,258 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Millett, P. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

Viewed 1,293 times.
Student Interaction in the Math Classroom: Stealing Ideas or Building UnderstandingAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Research tells us that student interaction – through classroom discussion and other forms of interactive participation – is foundational to deep understanding and related student achievement. But implementing discussion in the mathematics classroom has been found to be challenging."

Viewed 2,536 times.
Learning Mathematics vs Following “Rules”: The Value of Student-Generated MethodsAuthor(s): Lawson, A. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"There has been a significant shift in the instruction of mathematics over the past two decades. This shift has occurred in response to growing evidence that students were learning how to apply mathematics rules without a real understanding of the mathematics. A particularly disconcerting observation was that student difficulties often stemmed from our longstanding traditional methods of mathematics instruction."


Viewed 2,247 times.
The Educational Implications of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderAuthor(s): Tannock, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers should be aware that although there are many different perspectives on
ADHD, there is ample scientific evidence affirming its existence and its detrimental
impact on individuals. Classroom practices can make a difference for children with
ADHD."

Viewed 2,863 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

Viewed 1,270 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education, entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier, 1 at the moment when someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

Viewed 1,495 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

Viewed 1,216 times.
Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Lataille-Démoré, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

Viewed 1,633 times.
Drawing on Children’s “Sense of Place” – The Starting Point for Teaching Social Studies and GeographyAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Elementary school children now and then report that what they learn in school
sometimes seems disconnected from “real life” as they personally experience it
outside of school. Unfortunately, children tend to assume that subject learning that
doesn’t feel real to them isn’t real, or that its relevance ends when the school day is
over. This is a common problem in many subject areas, especially social studies and
geography. How can we make the study of “place” relevant and real to children?
Would the social studies curriculum be strengthened if it took account of the ways
in which children derive meaning and value from the real-life physical environments
that are familiar to them?"

Viewed 1,563 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’ self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

Viewed 2,803 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However, the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

Viewed 1,788 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Klein, P. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics. It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

Viewed 1,443 times.
What Complexity Science Tells Us about Teaching and LearningAuthor(s): Stanley, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Although complexity is
often perceived as a liability, this monograph considers how it can be viewed as
an asset and how the ideas behind complexity science might inform pedagogical
practices."

Viewed 1,256 times.
Early Identification and Intervention for At-Risk Readers in French ImmersionAuthor(s): Wise, N., Chen, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children who experience difficulty in learning to read often remain poor readers
in later years. An unfortunate cycle ensues, in that the more frustration these
children experience, the more disinterested they become in reading. Abundant
evidence links early identification of reading problems to constructive interventions
and improved student achievement."

Viewed 1,333 times.
The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Development of Secondary School YouthAuthor(s): Hands, C. (2008)
While many Ontario schools include character development and citizenship education as part of their curriculum, these topics have traditionally been taught to students in classrooms within the boundaries of schools. This research, on the other hand, investigated a character education program in one school that involved school-community partnerships.

Viewed 1,108 times.
Gender and Racial Advocacy Amongst Women AdministratorsAuthor(s): Wallace, J. (2007)
Drawing on data from two studies, the researcher explored equity policy development in Ontario and the cultural and racial advocacy practices of former female administrators in the province.

Viewed 892 times.
College MathematicsAuthor(s): Orpwood, G., Schollen, L. (2011)
The College Mathematics Project tracks first semester college mathematics achievement in all 24 colleges in Ontario, relating it to age, gender, and students secondary school mathematics backgrounds. It also promotes deliberations concerning ways to increase student success in college mathematics.

Viewed 1,141 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Hyslop‐Margison, E. J., Pinto, L. (2007)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

Viewed 935 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Bazzul, J., Sykes, H. (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

Viewed 1,430 times.
Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Dwyer, J., Kenneth, A., LeMoine, K., Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J., and Lysy, D. (2008)
The role of schools in providing opportunities for physical activity has become a topic of importance, as previous studies in Canada report both an increase in childhood obesity and a decrease in children’s daily physical activity. This study examines the physical activity programs offered in Ontario schools and the barriers that educators believe exist to providing these programs.

Viewed 841 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

Viewed 1,503 times.
Internet Safety in SchoolsAuthor(s): Barnett, J. (2005)
This study investigated internet safety within Southern Ontario schools. Specifically, the researcher explores whether preservice teachers believe their students are involved in unsafe internet practices and whether schools are being sufficiently proactive about on-line student safety.

Viewed 1,207 times.
Adolescent Stress and Coping StrategiesAuthor(s): Montgomery, C.
Academic performance has become one of the most prevalent stressors in western society for adolescents, and certain coping strategies can predict high school dropout (Hess & Copeland, 2001). However, studies on adolescent stress and coping present divergent causes of adolescent stress related to the environment. Moreover, results differ in terms of the way adolescents regulate their stress and coping. This literature review examines the scientific literature on the theme of adolescent stress and coping between 1997 and present and will answer the following questions in order to better understand high school dropout:
Question 1: What are the main causes of adolescents’ environmental stress?
Question 2: How do adolescents regulate their stress and coping?

Viewed 1,957 times.
Storytelling and Story WritingAuthor(s): Campbell, T., Husek, M. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of storytelling and story writing:

"By analyzing the written and spoken words of students in a Grade 4/5
class over a period of two months, we were able to explore the connections
between oral rehearsal – including storytelling – and story writing. We found
that the use of storytelling and peer talk stimulated significantly more writing
and higher-quality writing."

Viewed 1,323 times.
Try Literacy Tutoring FirstAuthor(s): Berrill, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy tutoring:

"In everyday teaching practice, teachers are on the move, circulating to see who needs help and pausing to give individualized, focused support. Yet, some children need significantly more time than teachers with responsibilities to the whole class can provide. Teachers know who these children are and find various ways to support their learning, from pairing them with more able peers and structuring guided reading activities, to providing differentiated instruction with materials for different ability levels. However, some children need still more assistance, both in terms of the frequency and the duration of the support they require. What else can teachers do?"

Viewed 1,022 times.
Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

Viewed 1,626 times.
Integrated Curriculum: Increasing Relevance while Maintaining AccountabilityAuthor(s): Drake, S., Reid, J. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on integrated curriculum:

"In addition to literacy and numeracy, teachers need to address other initiatives such as environmental education, character education and the new literacies (media, critical and technological). With so many curriculum expectations to
cover and assess, it’s not surprising that teachers sometimes feel overwhelmed. How can teachers do it all? One way to address these multiple expectations is by integrating the curriculum. Integrated curriculum teaches core concepts and skills by connecting multiple subject areas to a unifying theme or issue."

Viewed 1,416 times.
Forging Safer Learning Environments: Addressing Homophobic Bullying in SchoolsAuthor(s): Walton, G. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of bullying in schools:

"Issues concerning gender and sexuality are rich fodder for bullying. For students
who identify or are perceived as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT),
school can be especially harrowing, as these students are frequently targeted
for bullying."

Viewed 1,329 times.
Successful practices for immigrant parent involvement: An Ontario perspectiveAuthor(s): Ladky, M, Stagg, S. (2007)
This study brings together the perspectives of 21 immigrant parents who speak eight different languages
and have been in Canada less than six years with those of 61 teachers and 32 principals who work in
schools with English as a second language (ESL) populations of 20% or greater who have been recognized
as successfully involving immigrant parents in their children's schooling.

Viewed 1,346 times.
Monocultural to Multicultural: Parent PerceptionsAuthor(s): Levine-Rasky, C. (2009)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on parent perceptions on multiculturalism:

"Cynthia Levine-Rasky of Queen’s University conducted a study of one elementary public school where, as a result of an increase to the immigrant population in the elementary school’s catchment area, a significant shift from being predominantly white and middle class to a more diverse student body occurred."

Viewed 984 times.
Does Including Students With Special Needs in Grade 3 Classes Affect the Achievement of Students Without Special Needs?Author(s): Demeris, H., Childs, R., Jordan, A. (2008)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on the inclusion of special needs students in a Grade 3 classroom:

"Some parents and educators worry that inclusion – that is, placing students with special needs in the regular classroom – will negatively affect the academic achievement of the students without special needs, for example, by creating more demands on the teacher’s attention and for other resources. This study uses data from the 1997-1998 Ontario provincial assessment to investigate the relationship between the number of students with special needs in almost 2,000 grade-3 classes and the achievement scores of their peers without special needs."

Viewed 1,090 times.
Teacher Diversity in CanadaAuthor(s): Ryan, J., Pollock, K., Antonelli, F. (2010)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of teacher diversity in Canada:

"Canada’s population continues to become more racially diverse as current immigration and Canadian birth patterns change the face of the population. As the diversity of the general population has increased, so has the student population, particularly in the metropolitan areas. Despite this fact, the racialized teacher population has not kept pace with the racialized student and general population. In fact, it appears to be falling further and further behind."

Viewed 1,098 times.
Problem-Based Learning in Mathematics: A Tool for Developing Students' Conceptual KnowledgeAuthor(s): MacMath, S., Wallace, J., Chi, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary outlines research in the area of problem-based learning in math:

"Mathematics teachers must teach students not only to solve problems but also to learn about mathematics through problem solving. While “many students may develop procedural fluency … they often lack the deep conceptual understanding necessary to solve new problems or make connections between mathematical ideas.” This presents a challenge for teachers: problem-based learning (PBL) provides opportunities for teachers to meet this challenge."

Viewed 1,287 times.
Teaching English Language LearnersAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO): http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on teaching English Language Learners (ELL students):

Viewed 1,025 times.
Managing Teacher-Student Relationships: A Minimalist ApproachAuthor(s): Richmond, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on managing teacher-student relationships:

"Teachers can have two types of conversations with students in class. In the ideal situation the most potent
conversation is focused on learning, with minor support from the managing conversation. However, when
teachers experience lessons where conversation about managing dominates, the learning agenda can
disappear and poor outcomes are much more likely (Richmond, 2007)."

Viewed 1,606 times.
Prevent Bullying by Promoting Healthy RelationshipsAuthor(s): Pepler, D. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of bullying prevention:

"Teachers are critical in socializing children and shaping their relationships through moment-tomoment
interactions with their students. Through 20 years of research, we have come to
understand bullying as a relationship problem in which an individual uses power and aggression
to control and distress another....If bullying is a relationship problem, then it requires relationship solutions."

Viewed 1,856 times.
Why the Arts MatterAuthor(s): Upitis, R. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of Arts education:

"Many teachers are aware that the arts can be key in reaching students who do not respond well to traditional forms of learning. The arts also help students analyze complex issues from multiple perspectives. There is mounting evidence that the arts develop critical thinking skills, contribute to self-confidence, encourage risk-taking, and bolster achievement in other subjects."

Viewed 1,345 times.
Predicting Students' FuturesAuthor(s): Levin, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of predicting students' futures:

"Teachers often feel that they can predict students’ futures; that we can tell by, say, age 6 or 8
students’ academic destinies. This view is strengthened by studies that show a strong relationship
between various characteristics of students, such as their socio-economic status or their school
readiness, and their later achievement. In fact, predictions of this kind are fraught with problems....History is not destiny. We know that with the right supports, most people can achieve far more than anyone thought they could."

Viewed 892 times.
School-Based Family Literacy Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Pelletier, J. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of school-based family literacy intervention programs:

It has long been known that what parents do in the home regarding language stimulation and literacy related activities can boost children’s language abilities and school literacy. Recent evidence has shown the power of intervention programs to help parents support their children’s developing literacy."

Viewed 1,001 times.
Formative Assessment to Support Student LearningAuthor(s): Suurtamm, C. (2010)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of formative assessment to support student learning:

"We now have compelling research indicating that formative assessment may be the most
significant single factor in raising the academic achievement of all students and especially that of
lower-achieving students. Every teacher needs to consider how the principles of formative
assessment can be applied in her or his work."

Viewed 1,536 times.
Parent EngagementAuthor(s): Pushor, D. (2010)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of parent engagement:

"A wealth of research concludes that students are more likely to be successful when their parents are
engaged in their education....In light of this evidence, meaningful relationships that enhance parents’ opportunities to make important
contributions to student learning are vital to the work of teachers."

Viewed 925 times.
Science and Literacy in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Elliott, P. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Language, both spoken and written, is central to exploring scientific phenomena, sharing and testing ideas and demonstrating understanding. Additionally, language use in the learning of science aids students’ development of literacy and associated cognitive skills. So, how can we embed the acquisition of literacy
skills in science and promote synergy between the teaching of science and literacy?"

Viewed 934 times.
Word Study Instruction: Enhancing Reading ComprehensionAuthor(s): Scott, R. M. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Word study instruction can provide students with vital knowledge which they can then apply to the task of comprehending text. The nature of word study will vary with the developmental needs of students and the demands of the text. A teacher’s knowledge of the structure of English is an important factor in optimizing word study instruction; equally vital is the ability to present the study of spelling, vocabulary and word choice in a manner that engages students and entices them to explore words on a deeper level."

Viewed 1,316 times.
Improving Student Writing: Using Feedback as a Teaching ToolAuthor(s): Peterson, S. S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

Given that teachers spend a great deal of time providing written feedback to
students, it is important that the feedback have a greater influence on students’
writing development. Verbal or written feedback can be a powerful teaching tool
if it is given while students are in the process of writing drafts.....Focusing
on individual students’ immediate writing needs, this ongoing feedback is a form
of differentiated instruction that complements the teaching of mini-lessons to
small groups or to the whole class.

The teaching tools discussed [in this summary] support all students, Grades 4 to 12."

Viewed 1,434 times.
Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dionne, A. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

Viewed 1,836 times.
Video Games in the Classroom: Building Skills in Literacy and NumeracyAuthor(s): Duplàa, E., Shirmohammadi, S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As a society, we are seeing rapid and significant developments in video gaming, a field that is on its way to outdistancing the film and television industry. We are also witnessing the development and marketing of multiplayer online gaming. Yet much like the telephone at the turn of the century or television 50 years ago, video games are linked to controversy.... So, our question is, Can video games be used for learning in the classroom, particularly in the area of literacy and numeracy?"


Viewed 2,007 times.
The Voice of Text-to-Speech Technology: One Possible Solution for Struggling ReadersAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2011)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Classroom and special education teachers use many strategies to help students
read at grade level. But what do we do for children...for whom those
strategies are not effective? Assistive technology – specifically text-to-speech
technology (TTST) – offers a possible solution."

Viewed 1,799 times.
Word Problems: Connecting Language, Mathematics, and LifeAuthor(s): Barwell, R. (2011)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"To be successful in solving word problems, students need to learn how to read such problems. Simply decoding words or extracting arithmetic operations is not enough: students must learn to read between the lines and understand what they are expected to do mathematically....How, then, can students be supported to make sense of word problems so that they can treat them successfully as mathematical problems?"

Viewed 1,565 times.
Effective Strategies & Programs to Address Truancy (Unexcused Student Absence from School)Author(s): National Centre for School Engagement (2007)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on strategies and programs that address truancy (unexcused student absence from school).
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

Viewed 1,280 times.
TouchMath Program: Effectiveness for Individuals with Physical and Developmental DisabilitiesAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2011)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the TouchMath program.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

Viewed 1,250 times.
Enhancing Students' Social and Emotional LearningAuthor(s): Durlak, J., Weissberg, R., Dymnicki, A., Taylor, R., Schellinger, K. (2012)
This research summary was originally developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and has been updated by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB). It outlines a 2011 meta-analysis of school-based social and emotional learning programs. Findings show strong evidence that social-emotional learning has a positive impact on academic achievement. Based on the findings, successful approaches to programs are highlighted.

Viewed 1,200 times.
Depression Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Calear, A., Christensen, H. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2010 systematic review of school-based prevention and early intervention programs for depression, by Alison L. Calear and Helen Christensen.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 1,078 times.
Anxiety Prevention Programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Neil, A., Christensen, H. (2011)
This research summary was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines Alison L. Neil and Helen Christensen's 2009 systematic review of school-based and early intervention programs for anxiety.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 1,060 times.
Anti-bullying programs in schoolsAuthor(s): Farrington, D., Tfofi, M. (2012)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 systematic review of anti-bullying programs by David P Farrington and Maria M Tfofi.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Viewed 1,318 times.
Bullying prevention in schools: A survey of Ontario principalsAuthor(s): Smith, D., Cousins, B., Stewart, R. (2005)
This study explored the relations among various aspects of bullying prevention programs.

Viewed 906 times.
Restorative justice in an Ontario public schoolAuthor(s): Reimer, K. (2011)
This qualitative case study explores the implementation of restorative justice in one Ontario Public School. Restorative justice
is a philosophy and process for dealing with harmful behaviour, viewing such behaviour as a violation of relationships, not
rules.

Viewed 955 times.
Professional development and teacher efficacy in MathAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D., Esmonde, I., Ross, J., Dookie, L., Beatty, R. (2010)
This research investigates the effects of a focused professional development (PD) program on teacher beliefs about their efficacy in applying standards-based mathematics curriculum in Grade 6.

Viewed 1,270 times.
Bullying at school: Students report unsafe and high bullying areas within their schoolAuthor(s): Vaillancourt, T., Brittain, H., Bennett, L., Arnocky, S., McDougall, P., Hymel, S. Short, K., Sunderani, S. Scott, C. Mackenzie, M., Cunningham, L. (2010)
Bullying can cause a number of psychological and social issues in victims such as depression, poor self-image and greater dependency on adults. Bullying is common in elementary and secondary schooling and Canadian schools are no exception. Statistics show that more than one-third of Canadian students are either bullied, involved in bullying someone else, or both. Although there are a number of anti-bullying programs in effect in Canadian schools, reviews show that most have either shown no effect on reducing bullying rates, or in some cases, have actually caused harm. There is agreement that anti-bullying programs could be improved with increased adult supervision in certain areas (i.e. cafeteria, gym, etc.) where students are frequently bullied. This research surveyed elementary and secondary school students to identify such areas.

Viewed 1,010 times.
Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Areepattamannil, S., Freeman, J. (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

Viewed 1,212 times.
The regulation of Mp3 Players and cell phones in secondary schoolAuthor(s): Domitrek, J, Raby, R. (2008)
Recently, there has been much media coverage about cell phone and personal music player usage in schools, including in the
Toronto and Whitton regions. However, there is little literature on how students and teachers view rules on the use of such
electronic devices. Using data gathered from focus groups with students in Toronto and Whitton and interviews with teachers
and administrators from Whitton, we present the viewpoints from these stakeholders on the usage of cell phones and personal music players.

Viewed 1,303 times.
Teaching Diverse Books to a Diverse Student PopulationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

Viewed 886 times.
What Shapes Inner City Education Policy?Author(s): Gaskell, J., Levin, B., Pollock, K. (2007)
This research looks at the ways that urban school boards in Toronto and Winnipeg have attempted over the last thirty to forty years to address issues of poverty and diversity.

Viewed 1,130 times.
Black Canadian Students' Beliefs Regarding Education and Academic AchievementAuthor(s): Smith, A., Schneider, B., Ruck, M. (2005)
There are concerns about the educational outcomes of Black youth in North America. This research compared the academic and achievement-related beliefs of Black Canadian high school students in Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Viewed 1,186 times.
Teacher intervention in situations of bullyingAuthor(s): Blain-Arcaro, C., Smith, D., Cunningham, C., Vaillancourt, T., Rimas, H.
The goal of this study was to determine what features of bullying situations influence teachers’ decision to intervene. To
accomplish this, the researchers used a forced-choice task that reveals the degree of importance teachers place on different features of
bullying situations in their decisions to intervene or not.

Resource about bullying: Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network Website: http://www.prevnet.ca/

Viewed 979 times.
After-School Literacy Activities and Performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

Viewed 1,292 times.
Helping children with their schooling: A comparison of parents of children with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Author(s): Rogers M.A., Wiener, J., Marton, I., Tannock, R. (2009)
It is often reported by teachers and parents that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have problems in school: they are less engaged, have lower grades, lower graduation rates and require more attention from teachers. Children with ADHD also have similar problems outside the classroom. These problems are not surprising because the symptoms associated with ADHD make learning more difficult. While there is research that describes how and why parents of children without ADHD are involved in their children’s learning, and that this involvement benefits the children, there is little information about parental involvement in the schooling of children with ADHD. This study explored parental involvement in the learning of students with ADHD.

Viewed 1,284 times.
Remain in a K-8 school or transition to junior high?: Differences in student achievementAuthor(s): Whitley, J., Lupart, J., Beran, T. (2007)
There is general agreement that when students transition from elementary to junior high school, their academic performance can suffer. Some researchers claim that the difficulties that students experience in this transition might have long-term negative effects. With this in mind, many education systems in Canada have taken steps to make the transition from elementary to junior high school smoother for students.
This research used nationally representative survey data to see if there were any actual differences in achievement between students who transitioned to grade seven from an elementary school compared to those who remained in the same school.

Viewed 1,189 times.
Contextual Learning at Summer CampAuthor(s): Fine, S. (2005)
This research explores how contexts linked to residential outdoor experiences (ROE) contribute to significant learning. It addresses the need for the reconsideration and restoration of routine outdoor programs in Ontario schools and teacher training in this area.

Viewed 964 times.
Using Technology to Teach FractionsAuthor(s): Ross, J., Bruce, C. (2009)
In North America, students have traditionally struggled to learn fractions. This is a critical issue as understanding fractions is an important aspect of everyday decision-making. Teachers have also struggled with teaching students the concepts behind fractions because of a lack of discipline knowledge and pedagogical content. This research introduced five sets of learning objects, called CLIPS, which were developed to assist teachers in teaching the concepts behind fractions.

Viewed 2,317 times.
Equity Measures Compared Between Three ProvincesAuthor(s): Li, X. (2010)
This study compares the elementary education funding formula in Ontario, Alberta, and BC with a focus on
vertical equity from the students’ perspective. The similarities and differences, particularly the measures
related to assisting disadvantaged students, of the three formula are analyzed and their possible implications are explored. With increasingly diverse students in schools, it is important to understand how equity measures in provincial funding formula work to meet the needs of all students.

Viewed 898 times.
Smoking in Ontario Schools: Does policy make a difference?Author(s): Reitsma, A., Manske, S. (2004)
Although tobacco use has decreased in Canada it remains the country’s leading cause of premature death. Most people (85%) start smoking before the age of 18 despite the fact that Canadian federal laws make it illegal for people under the age of 18 to buy cigarettes. Many provinces set the bar at 19 years. Therefore, schools are a key environment to support youth remaining tobacco-free.
The researchers in this study assessed the link between school tobacco policy and smoking status in Ontario elementary and secondary schools in 2003.

Viewed 1,184 times.
Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for Second Language StudentsAuthor(s): Cheng, L., Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2007)
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

Viewed 1,352 times.
Bullying, Student-Teacher Relationships, and Academic PerformanceAuthor(s): Konishi, C., Hymel, S., Zumbo, B., Li, Z. (2010)
Research conducted in Ontario schools has shown that large numbers of students experience violence and bullying in schools. Bullying has been found to have a negative impact on school performance and student development in general. This study looked at whether student’s academic performance is related to rates of bullying at school level, whether student-teacher connectedness has an impact on the bullying-achievement relationship and whether students who feel they have a positive relationship with their teachers perform well academically even if bullying happens at their school.

Viewed 1,816 times.