Search Results

Training Partners in Augmentative and Alternative CommunicationAuthor(s): Shire, S. and Jones, N. (2015)
Augmentative and assistive communication provides individuals with tools and aids to participate in a variety of interactions and activities. This study found that...

Viewed 303 times.
Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): McQuirter Scott, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

Viewed 1,345 times.
Perspectives on the Afrocentric School: Voices of Black YouthAuthor(s): Gordon, M. and Zinga, D. (2012)
In 2009 the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) opened the first black-focused or africentric school in Ontario. This study explored the opinions of black youth regarding the proposal of a black-focused school. Specifically the research aimed to explore black youths’ ideas about whether a black-focused school would address the issue of academic disengagement amongst black students.

Viewed 642 times.
Islamic Schooling in OntarioAuthor(s): Zine, J. (2004)
Four full-time Islamic schools are the focus of this study on alternative schooling. The objectives of this research were: to identify the role and function of Islamic schooling in a diasporic context; to understand the role of Islamic education in the development of Islamic identity; to examine the Islamization of knowledge and pedagogy in Islamic schools.

This research study also focused on the knowledge production of Islamically-centred education, the teaching strategies and ways of socialization and discipline. These areas are examined to understand the religious and spiritual traditions of Islam in schools.

Viewed 864 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’ self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

Viewed 2,803 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Bazzul, J., Sykes, H. (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

Viewed 1,430 times.
Supporting Aboriginal Educators in Pre-service Training Programs and in their Careers as TeachersAuthor(s): Kitchen, J., Cherubini, L., Trudeau, L., Hodson, J. (2010)
This research explored the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers in both mainstream and native teacher education programs in Ontario. These early-career teachers from the Mohawk, Anishinabe and Métis groups reflected upon the challenges they encountered during their teacher preparation courses and first years of teaching. Specifically, this research identified the need to design current teacher education programs that value the individual and cultural identities of Aboriginal teacher candidates.

Viewed 1,884 times.
After-School Literacy Activities and Performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

Viewed 1,292 times.
Remain in a K-8 school or transition to junior high?: Differences in student achievementAuthor(s): Whitley, J., Lupart, J., Beran, T. (2007)
There is general agreement that when students transition from elementary to junior high school, their academic performance can suffer. Some researchers claim that the difficulties that students experience in this transition might have long-term negative effects. With this in mind, many education systems in Canada have taken steps to make the transition from elementary to junior high school smoother for students.
This research used nationally representative survey data to see if there were any actual differences in achievement between students who transitioned to grade seven from an elementary school compared to those who remained in the same school.

Viewed 1,189 times.