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Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dionne, A. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

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Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,355 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

This document has been viewed 1,208 times.