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After-school literacy activities and performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

This document has been viewed 1,145 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

This document has been viewed 1,315 times.
Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): Kim J. S. & Quinn, D. M. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from
low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures
of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

This document has been viewed 806 times.
Assessing Text Difficulty for StudentsAuthor(s): Murphy, S. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

This monograph explores three key kinds of knowledge that may help teachers arrive at more informed and defensible judgments about the likelihood of a text’s readability for children:
1. knowledge about the reader’s characteristics and the reading task
2. knowledge about the surface features of a text
3.knowledge about the deeper features of texts and the modalities represented in the text.

This document has been viewed 1,219 times.
Assistive Technology Tools: Supporting Literacy Learning for all Learners in the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): Sider, S.; Maich, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

We are particularly interested in considering how assistive technology can be used to support the literacy achievement of all students, an area not frequently examined in the scholarly literature. In this article, we discuss the range of assistive technology tools available to students and teachers from a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) perspective, wherein strategies, resources and tools are incorporated with the needs of all students in mind.

This document has been viewed 1,763 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,625 times.
Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for second language studentsAuthor(s): Cheng, L., Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2007)
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

This document has been viewed 1,291 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Klein, P. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a
range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics.
It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media
that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for
success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what
students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can
draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

This document has been viewed 1,317 times.
Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dionne, A. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

This document has been viewed 1,732 times.
Early Identification and Intervention for At-Risk Readers in French ImmersionAuthor(s): Wise, N., Chen, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children who experience difficulty in learning to read often remain poor readers
in later years. An unfortunate cycle ensues, in that the more frustration these
children experience, the more disinterested they become in reading. Abundant
evidence links early identification of reading problems to constructive interventions
and improved student achievement."

This document has been viewed 1,295 times.
Effective Reading Programs for All Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Chambers, B., Cheung, A., & Davis, S. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of elementary
reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that instructional process programs designed to change daily teaching practices had substantially greater research
support than programs that focused on curriculum or technology alone. "

This document has been viewed 1,509 times.
Effective Reading Programs for Struggling Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Davis, S., & Madden, N. A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of remedial reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that the most effective strategy for remedial readers was an initial focus on improving classroom instruction methods, followed by one‐on‐one tutoring with an emphasis on phonics for students who continued to struggle."

This document has been viewed 2,106 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

This document has been viewed 1,206 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Hyslop‐Margison, E. J., Pinto, L. (2007)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 907 times.
Kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' literacy knowledge and parental involvementAuthor(s): Lynch, J. (2010)
This study examined whether there were differences in kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' print literacy
knowledge and about parental involvement in children's literacy events based on the socio-economic status (SES) of children's families.

This document has been viewed 963 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

This document has been viewed 1,404 times.
Poetry: A Powerful Medium for Literacy and Technology DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hughes, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of poetry and technology:

"Traditional notions of literacy were once related more or less exclusively to competence
in reading and writing. We have expanded these notions to include usage and
comprehension skills in speaking, listening, viewing, and representing – by which we
mean communicating through a variety of media, including visual art, drama, and
multimedia performances. In this context, our definition of literacy extends to
fluency in reading and creating electronic media. In a time when the focus is on
improving literacy, what role might poetry, a genre that is often marginalized in the
English language arts classroom, play in literacy development? How can poetry be
taught in ways that engage students, so that we can tap into its literacy-enhancing
power?"

This document has been viewed 1,171 times.
Program In Brief: Empower Reading ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB
The Empower™ Reading program is designed to teach word identification skills and decoding strategies and to promote the effective use of these strategies. Applying these strategies effectively, the student can develop the basic skills needed for independent reading for meaning, information, or pleasure. The program focuses on 5 strategies: Sounding Out strategy, Rhyming strategy, Peeling Off strategy, Vowel Alert strategy, and SPY strategy, embedded in a metacognitive frame work.

This document has been viewed 2,684 times.
Program in Brief: Kindergarten Language and Literacy in the Classroom (KLLIC)Author(s): E-BEST, HWDSB (2011)
This summary was created by the E-Best team at the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board. This and other research summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Kindergarten Language and Literacy in the Classroom (KLLIC) is 20
weeks in length, and is divided into 10 sections or cycles. The program was developed to help children in kindergarten learn
language skills that are the foundations for later literacy skills.

This document has been viewed 287 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 966 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

This document has been viewed 1,102 times.
School-Based Family Literacy Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Pelletier, J. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of school-based family literacy intervention programs:

It has long been known that what parents do in the home regarding language stimulation and literacy related activities can boost children’s language abilities and school literacy. Recent evidence has shown the power of intervention programs to help parents support their children’s developing literacy."

This document has been viewed 961 times.
Science and Literacy in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Elliott, P. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Language, both spoken and written, is central to exploring scientific phenomena, sharing and testing ideas and demonstrating understanding. Additionally, language use in the learning of science aids students’ development of literacy and associated cognitive skills. So, how can we embed the acquisition of literacy
skills in science and promote synergy between the teaching of science and literacy?"

This document has been viewed 908 times.
Storytelling and Story WritingAuthor(s): Campbell, T., Husek, M. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of storytelling and story writing:

"By analyzing the written and spoken words of students in a Grade 4/5
class over a period of two months, we were able to explore the connections
between oral rehearsal – including storytelling – and story writing. We found
that the use of storytelling and peer talk stimulated significantly more writing
and higher-quality writing."

This document has been viewed 1,278 times.
Student Motivation to Learn Core FrenchAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2010)
This study investigated the motivation of students born in Canada (and whose first language was English) to learn French, compared with Allophone students (students whose first language was neither French nor English) and who were born outside of Canada. Specifically, this study compared the motivation of Allophones who began learning French in grade 9 after coming to Canada, to Canadian-born students who began learning French in grade 4.

This document has been viewed 907 times.
Supporting Early Literacy Learning Through PlayAuthor(s): Wood, J. (2017)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This article discusses how educators can support and enhance children't literacies learning and use through a play-based approach

This document has been viewed 299 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

This document has been viewed 980 times.
Supporting Students' Vocabulary Development Through PlayAuthor(s): Stagg Peterson, S. (2016)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

The relationships that researchers have found between children's vocabulary and their literacy and overall school success indicate the importance of vocabulary instruction. This article provides tips for teachers to support children's vocabulary development through play.

This document has been viewed 25 times.
Teaching English Language LearnersAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on teaching English Language Learners (ELL students):

This document has been viewed 986 times.
The Effectiveness of Literacy CoachesAuthor(s): Lynch, J., Alsop, S. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy coaches:

"This article offers a review of studies on literacy coaches. It highlights the diversity
of roles that coaches play, the resulting improvements to student achievement, and
the implications this holds for teachers and principals working with coaches to
improve student learning in elementary schools."

This document has been viewed 1,161 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 1,088 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

This document has been viewed 1,217 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,305 times.
Try Literacy Tutoring FirstAuthor(s): Berrill, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy tutoring:

"In everyday teaching practice, teachers are on the move, circulating to see who needs help and pausing to give individualized, focused support. Yet, some children need significantly more time than teachers with responsibilities to the whole class can provide. Teachers know who these children are and find various ways to support their learning, from pairing them with more able peers and structuring guided reading activities, to providing differentiated instruction with materials for different ability levels. However, some children need still more assistance, both in terms of the frequency and the duration of the support they require. What else can teachers do?"

This document has been viewed 997 times.
Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the CurriculumAuthor(s): Brett, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"While the Internet is now the number one information source for both children and adults, research is
showing that online reading does differ importantly from print-based reading (Coiro & Dobler, 2007;
Coiro, 2007)...."

This document has been viewed 1,245 times.
Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the CurriculumAuthor(s): Brett, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 617 times.
Using Digital Technology to Support Word Study InstructionAuthor(s): McQuirter Scott, R. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Students encounter a wide range of vocabulary as they search multiple websites, listen to video and audio files, and engage in social media. Digital technologies can present an alternative way of teaching word study, while still addressing many concerns of traditional paper-and-pencil resources.

This document has been viewed 1,195 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Cornford, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,246 times.
Video Games in the Classroom: Building Skills in Literacy and NumeracyAuthor(s): Duplàa, E., Shirmohammadi, S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As a society, we are seeing rapid and significant developments in video gaming,
a field that is on its way to outdistancing the film and television industry.
We are also witnessing the development and marketing of multiplayer online
gaming. Yet much like the telephone at the turn of the century or television
50 years ago, video games are linked to controversy....So, our question is, Can video games be used for learning in the classroom,
particularly in the area of literacy and numeracy?"


This document has been viewed 1,769 times.