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Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Gillian Parekh; Isabel Killoran; Cameron Crawford (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

This document has been viewed 1,017 times.
Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jessica Jones (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

This document has been viewed 1,132 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Dr. John Ippolito
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,094 times.
Ensuring Students with Learning Disabilities Have Proper Documentation as they Transition into Post-secondary InstitutionsAuthor(s): Allyson G. Harrison; Eva Nichols; Anne-Claire Larochette (2008)
The Ontario Human Rights Code (1990) guarantees students diagnosed with a learning disability (LD) the right to accommodations that meet their academic needs at the post-secondary level (College and University). Not all students, however, arrive equipped with the necessary documentation to guarantee this support. This study investigated the quality of documentation presented by students entering post-secondary institutions in support of their LD and, in so doing, exposes current practices for identifying students (declaring students Exceptional) at the elementary and secondary levels.

This document has been viewed 1,038 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Elizabeth Savaria (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

This document has been viewed 971 times.
Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Philip Burge; Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz; Nancy Hutchinson; Hugh Box (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 993 times.
Supporting Young People with Disabilities in their Transition to Adult Services: Developing Best PracticesAuthor(s): Debra Stewart (2009)
Transitioning from school and youth services to adult services can be a very challenging process for young people with disabilities and their families. This article reports on the Best Practice Project, a joint effort of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, and the Ontario Children’s Rehabilitation
Network. Facilitated by a team of researchers, the project focused on establishing best practice guidelines for the process of transitioning from school and youth services to adult services for young people with physical and developmental disabilities in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 985 times.
The Educational Implications of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderAuthor(s): Rosemary Tannock
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers should be aware that although there are many different perspectives on
ADHD, there is ample scientific evidence affirming its existence and its detrimental
impact on individuals. Classroom practices can make a difference for children with
ADHD."

This document has been viewed 2,367 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Catherine Cornford
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,092 times.