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Assistive Technology Tools: Supporting Literacy Learning for all Learners in the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): Sider, S.; Maich, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

We are particularly interested in considering how assistive technology can be used to support the literacy achievement of all students, an area not frequently examined in the scholarly literature. In this article, we discuss the range of assistive technology tools available to students and teachers from a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) perspective, wherein strategies, resources and tools are incorporated with the needs of all students in mind.

This document has been viewed 1,666 times.
Best Practices in Walk-Throughs, an Instructional Supervision Technique, and the Impact on Student AchievementAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB (2009)
This "BLAM" (Bottom Line Actionable Message) was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on best practices for walk-throughs as an instructional supervision strategy to increase student acheivement. You can also view this, and other BLAMs, at the HWDSB website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/?page_id=205

"Overall, the literature summarized in this BLAM, shows that walk-throughs can have a positive impact on student achievement
providing that they are transparent, non-evaluative, focused on an
improvement area and conducted frequently (at least once per
week). Walk-throughs should facilitate open dialogue between
teachers and principals..."

This document has been viewed 1,270 times.
Calling Upon Other Language Skills to Enhance Second Language LearningAuthor(s): Mady, C. and Garbati, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

The impact of other languages on students’ target language proficiency and the degree to which they should be used in the second language classroom remain topics of debate. This monograph explores why and how to make use of students’ prior language knowledge in the second language class.

This document has been viewed 832 times.
Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Lataille-Démoré, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

This document has been viewed 1,443 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Klein, P. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a
range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics.
It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media
that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for
success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what
students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can
draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

This document has been viewed 1,274 times.
Cultivating Student Engagement Through Interactive Art StrategiesAuthor(s): Cho, C.; Vitale, J. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

While we know that engaged students are more invested in their learning, the arts remain an underutilized strategy for student engagement. The reality is that many teachers lack confidence teaching both visual arts and music. We feel strongly that the generalist teacher can develop a repertoire of strategies – such as those discussed here – to increase their confidence and provide authentic and sincere arts-based experiences for learners.

This document has been viewed 972 times.
Drawing on Children’s “Sense of Place” – The Starting Point for Teaching Social Studies and GeographyAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Elementary school children now and then report that what they learn in school
sometimes seems disconnected from “real life” as they personally experience it
outside of school. Unfortunately, children tend to assume that subject learning that
doesn’t feel real to them isn’t real, or that its relevance ends when the school day is
over. This is a common problem in many subject areas, especially social studies and
geography. How can we make the study of “place” relevant and real to children?
Would the social studies curriculum be strengthened if it took account of the ways
in which children derive meaning and value from the real-life physical environments
that are familiar to them?"

This document has been viewed 1,378 times.
Early Identification and Intervention for At-Risk Readers in French ImmersionAuthor(s): Wise, N., Chen, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children who experience difficulty in learning to read often remain poor readers
in later years. An unfortunate cycle ensues, in that the more frustration these
children experience, the more disinterested they become in reading. Abundant
evidence links early identification of reading problems to constructive interventions
and improved student achievement."

This document has been viewed 1,284 times.
Effective Reading Programs for All Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Chambers, B., Cheung, A., & Davis, S. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of elementary
reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that instructional process programs designed to change daily teaching practices had substantially greater research
support than programs that focused on curriculum or technology alone. "

This document has been viewed 1,466 times.
Effective Reading Programs for Struggling Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Davis, S., & Madden, N. A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of remedial reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that the most effective strategy for remedial readers was an initial focus on improving classroom instruction methods, followed by one‐on‐one tutoring with an emphasis on phonics for students who continued to struggle."

This document has been viewed 1,984 times.
Engaging students through the ArtsAuthor(s): Upitis, R. (2011)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of arts education:

"Student engagement is central to learning. Those students who are fully engaged are ready to learn in every way – physically, socially, emotionally and intellectually. The arts play a vital role in ensuring that students remain
engaged by encouraging them to learn in physical and embodied ways, by inviting them to collaborate with peers, by requiring them to respond emotionally and by calling upon their cognitive capacities as they learn in, through and about the arts."

This document has been viewed 911 times.
Equity, Social Justice, and the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): James, C.E. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 1,433 times.
Exploring the Use of Literature Across Elementary CurriculumAuthor(s): Pantaleo, S. (2002)
This study investigated the use of literature in elementary classrooms across subject areas. The researcher explored teacher and teacher-librarians’ use of different genres of literature including: realistic fiction (stories about everyday life), non-fiction, fantasy (science fiction, quest stories), poetry, traditional literature (myths, legends, folktales), and historical fiction. The researcher investigated the overall use of these genres by teachers and teacher-librarians and also the use of Canadian literature within each genre.

This document has been viewed 1,117 times.
Gender Stereotypes and Musical InstrumentsAuthor(s): Buttu, S. (2008)
This study investigated the perceptions of girls enrolled in a single-sex school about gender stereotypes in relation to musical instruments. The research study focused on whether stereotypes impact girls’ decisions to play a certain instrument and how girls from an all girl school describe their experiences of playing their instruments in their own school and in co-educational environments such as band camp.

This document has been viewed 898 times.
Integrated Curriculum: Increasing Relevance while Maintaining AccountabilityAuthor(s): Drake, S., Reid, J. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on integrated curriculum:

"In addition to literacy and numeracy, teachers need to address other initiatives such as environmental education, character education and the new literacies (media, critical and technological). With so many curriculum expectations to
cover and assess, it’s not surprising that teachers sometimes feel overwhelmed. How can teachers do it all? One way to address these multiple expectations is by integrating the curriculum. Integrated curriculum teaches core concepts and skills by connecting multiple subject areas to a unifying theme or issue."

This document has been viewed 1,311 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,300 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

This document has been viewed 1,348 times.
Performing Poetry: Using Drama to Increase the Comprehension on PoetryAuthor(s): Ferguson, K. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Poetry can be both challenging and intimidating to teach and learn. But how can teachers teach poetry comprehension without falling into the trap of mechanically dissecting poems for form and “real” meaning? Drama is one strategy, grounded in research, that fosters student comprehension of poetry and allows students to apply comprehension strategies.

This document has been viewed 1,001 times.
Placing Music at the Centre of Literacy InstructionAuthor(s): Boldu, J., Fleuret, C. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"This monograph begins with a survey of research which suggests that musical
activities promote the development of auditory perception and phonological
awareness as well as metacognitive and metalinguistic skills. It then presents
four pedagogical interventions. By way of conclusion, it reiterates the importance
of musical acitivities and music education in schools."


This document has been viewed 1,078 times.
Poetry: A Powerful Medium for Literacy and Technology DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hughes, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of poetry and technology:

"Traditional notions of literacy were once related more or less exclusively to competence
in reading and writing. We have expanded these notions to include usage and
comprehension skills in speaking, listening, viewing, and representing – by which we
mean communicating through a variety of media, including visual art, drama, and
multimedia performances. In this context, our definition of literacy extends to
fluency in reading and creating electronic media. In a time when the focus is on
improving literacy, what role might poetry, a genre that is often marginalized in the
English language arts classroom, play in literacy development? How can poetry be
taught in ways that engage students, so that we can tap into its literacy-enhancing
power?"

This document has been viewed 1,124 times.
Program In Brief: Empower Reading ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB
The Empower™ Reading program is designed to teach word identification skills and decoding strategies and to promote the effective use of these strategies. Applying these strategies effectively, the student can develop the basic skills needed for independent reading for meaning, information, or pleasure. The program focuses on 5 strategies: Sounding Out strategy, Rhyming strategy, Peeling Off strategy, Vowel Alert strategy, and SPY strategy, embedded in a metacognitive frame work.

This document has been viewed 2,492 times.
Programs in Brief: Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)Author(s): The PALS program was developed by the Kennedy Centre for Human Development at Vanderbilt University.
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) program. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"PALS is a systematic class‐wide reading program for students in
kindergarten to grade 6. PALS builds reading fluency and
comprehension skills through a set of activities that students are
engaged in for 35 – 45 minute sessions, 3 – 4 times a week. The
classroom teacher provides the initial lesson followed by a
prescribed lesson with materials provided . This is followed by
students working in pairs to practice and reinforce the skills
taught."

This document has been viewed 1,652 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

This document has been viewed 1,179 times.
Storytelling and Story WritingAuthor(s): Campbell, T., Husek, M. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of storytelling and story writing:

"By analyzing the written and spoken words of students in a Grade 4/5
class over a period of two months, we were able to explore the connections
between oral rehearsal – including storytelling – and story writing. We found
that the use of storytelling and peer talk stimulated significantly more writing
and higher-quality writing."

This document has been viewed 1,260 times.
Student Interaction in the Math Classroom: Stealing Ideas or Building UnderstandingAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Research tells us that student interaction – through classroom discussion and other forms of interactive participation – is foundational to deep understanding and related student achievement. But implementing discussion in the mathematics classroom has been found to be challenging."

This document has been viewed 2,193 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

This document has been viewed 1,082 times.
Teaching Science as a Process of InquiryAuthor(s): Melville W., Bartley A. & Fazio, X. (2012)
This study investigated the attitudes and experiences of pre-service secondary school science teachers who are learning to teach science as a process of inquiry. The pre-service teachers were enrolled in a full-year science methodology course at an Ontario faculty of education, which aimed to challenge the belief that scientific investigation is only conducted using one universal step-by-step process.


This document has been viewed 1,062 times.
Technology in the Mathematics ClassroomAuthor(s): Bruce, C.D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of interactive whiteboards:

"Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are a relatively new learning tool. While some early studies suggest that they may only be a “slick presentation tool” used to enhance teacher-directed lessons, others have identified a greater potential. Research on use in mathematics classrooms suggests that when we combine thoughtful professional learning with implementation, we enable teachers to maximize the use of IWBs to enhance student learning through multi-modal representations and inquiry approaches."

This document has been viewed 2,131 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Flynn, R., Marquis, R., Paquet, M., Peeke, L. & Aubry, T. (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

This document has been viewed 1,106 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,265 times.
Trigonometry in Grade 3?Author(s): Gadanidis, G. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating rich math environments:

"Young students...benefit from opportunities for using imagination and sensing mathematical beauty. This monograph shares our research in this area, highlighting the ways we have engaged children
with ideas that are well beyond their grade level."

This document has been viewed 1,473 times.
Using a Professional Learning Community to Support Multimodal LiteraciesAuthor(s): Lotherington, H., Paige, H. and Holland-Spencer, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy instruction is under pressure, being pushed towards screen-based, digitally networked environments, while simultaneously adhering to print- based reading and writing practices. Teachers are pulled in opposing directions as literacy is applied to an expanding grey area of evolving texts that do not fit comfortably within conventional school curricular expectations and assessments. How can teachers change their literacy teaching practices to incorporate integrated pedagogical approaches while still ensuring student success?

This document has been viewed 785 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Millett, P. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,226 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): van Barneveld, C. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,548 times.
Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the CurriculumAuthor(s): Brett, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"While the Internet is now the number one information source for both children and adults, research is
showing that online reading does differ importantly from print-based reading (Coiro & Dobler, 2007;
Coiro, 2007)...."

This document has been viewed 1,208 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Cornford, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,196 times.
Using Video Games to Teach ScienceAuthor(s): Jaipal, K. and Figg, C. (2009)
This study explored the use of a video game in the science classroom and it’s impact on teaching and learning. More specifically, this study focused on Nano Legends, an educational video game about cell division and cancer, which was implemented by four grade 8 science teachers in 2007.

This document has been viewed 935 times.
What Complexity Science Tells Us about Teaching and LearningAuthor(s): Stanley, D. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Although complexity is
often perceived as a liability, this monograph considers how it can be viewed as
an asset and how the ideas behind complexity science might inform pedagogical
practices."

This document has been viewed 1,108 times.
What ECE Teachers Think About Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood EducationAuthor(s): Wood, E., Specht, J., Willoughby, T. & Mueller, J. (2008)
This research study examined the perceptions of early childhood educators regarding integrating computer technology into pre-school classrooms. Specifically, this research focused on educators’ perceived advantages and disadvantages of such computer use and the barriers and supports that exist for pre-school educators in teaching computer technology curricula.

This document has been viewed 1,314 times.