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Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Wayne Martino (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,527 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Dr. John Ippolito
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,117 times.
Bullying predicts dating violence & poor relationship qualityAuthor(s): Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study showed that bullying predicts dating violence and poor relationship quality in adolescent dating relationships. These results illustrate how peer and dating relationship contexts are interconnected during adolescence. Youth who display aggression and other unhealthy behaviours in one type of relationship are likely to do so in others as well....

This document has been viewed 260 times.
Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dr. Anne-Marie Dionne
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

This document has been viewed 1,646 times.
Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): John Cairney; Matthew Kwan; Scott Velduizen (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 964 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Loucaides, C., Plotnikoff, R. and Bercovitz, K. (2007)
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

This document has been viewed 729 times.
Forging Safer Learning Environments: Addressing Homophobic Bullying in SchoolsAuthor(s): Gerald Walton
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of bullying in schools:

"Issues concerning gender and sexuality are rich fodder for bullying. For students
who identify or are perceived as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT),
school can be especially harrowing, as these students are frequently targeted
for bullying."

This document has been viewed 1,218 times.
Gender and Racial Advocacy Amongst Women AdministratorsAuthor(s): Janice Wallace (2007)
Drawing on data from two studies, the researcher explored equity policy development in Ontario and the cultural and racial advocacy practices of former female administrators in the province.

This document has been viewed 851 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Robin Kay
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,299 times.
Gender Stereotypes and Musical InstrumentsAuthor(s): Sommer Buttu (2008)
This study investigated the perceptions of girls enrolled in a single-sex school about gender stereotypes in relation to musical instruments. The research study focused on whether stereotypes impact girls’ decisions to play a certain instrument and how girls from an all girl school describe their experiences of playing their instruments in their own school and in co-educational environments such as band camp.

This document has been viewed 891 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Jesse Bazzul; Heather Sykes (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

This document has been viewed 1,250 times.
Is Gender a Consideration in the Hiring and Rotation of Secondary School Principals?Author(s): Cecilia Reynolds; Robert White; Carol Brayman; Shawn Moore (2008)
Government statistics from the early 2000s in Ontario, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia illustrate that the percentage of women secondary school principals has risen over the past thirty years. This study investigated whether gender is a factor in the hiring and rotation practices of school boards within these four provinces.

This document has been viewed 860 times.
Participation at Canadian Universities: A Growing Gender GapAuthor(s): Louis N. Christofides; Michael Hoy; Ling Yang (2010)
The participation rate of young women at universities has steadily been increasing, with women now more likely to enroll in university than men. For example, in 2005, a 15 percentage point gap existed between the participation rate of women at university compared to men. This research study investigated the factors influencing young people’s decision to attend university and whether these factors are different for men and women.

This document has been viewed 1,141 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Katrina Craig; David Bell; Alan Leschied (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

This document has been viewed 1,363 times.
Preventing Alcohol Use Problems Among Aboriginal YouthAuthor(s): Jennine S. Rawana; Megan E. Ames (2011)
This summary was produced by EENet. For more information on EENet and access to other summaries, please visit http://eenet.ca/

Youth who experiment with alcohol may be at risk of future alcohol use problems. Studies and trends show that Aboriginal youth may be at an even greater risk of developing such alcohol and drug use problems. For all teens, certain risk factors may worsen their vulnerability to developing alcohol disorders. Likewise, certain protective factors ward off alcohol dependence amongst teens. This study examines the protective factors of alcohol use among off-reserve Canadian Aboriginal youth.

This document has been viewed 1,024 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Serge Demers; Carole Bennett
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

This document has been viewed 1,165 times.
Teacher Diversity in CanadaAuthor(s): James Ryan; Katina Pollock; Fab Antonelli
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of teacher diversity in Canada:

"Canada’s population continues to become more racially diverse as current immigration and Canadian birth patterns change the face of the population. As the diversity of the general population has increased, so has the student population, particularly in the metropolitan areas. Despite this fact, the racialized teacher population has not kept pace with the racialized student and general population. In fact, it appears to be falling further and further behind."

This document has been viewed 1,055 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Guy Faulkner; Edward Adlaf; Hyacinth Irving; Kenneth Allison; John Dwyer (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 796 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Dr. David Hutchison
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,225 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada? Author(s): Louis N. Christofides ; Michael Hoy ; Ling Yang (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

This document has been viewed 1,087 times.