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Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Areepattamannil, S., Freeman, J. (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

This document has been viewed 1,027 times.
Helping children with their schooling: A comparison of parents of children with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Author(s): Rogers M.A., Wiener, J., Marton, I., Tannock, R. (2009)
It is often reported by teachers and parents that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have problems in school: they are less engaged, have lower grades, lower graduation rates and require more attention from teachers. Children with ADHD also have similar problems outside the classroom. These problems are not surprising because the symptoms associated with ADHD make learning more difficult. While there is research that describes how and why parents of children without ADHD are involved in their children’s learning, and that this involvement benefits the children, there is little information about parental involvement in the schooling of children with ADHD. This study explored parental involvement in the learning of students with ADHD.

This document has been viewed 1,224 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hamilton, H.A., Marshall, L., Rummens, J.A., Fenta, H. & Simich, L. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 946 times.
Poor peer & family relationships predict dating violence in adolescent girlsAuthor(s): Chiodo, D., Crooks, C.V., Wolfe, D.A., McIsaac, C., Hughs, R., and Jaffe, P.G. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The findings from this study underscore the importance of developing early prevention programming to enhance adolescent feelings of school connectedness, positive school attitudes, and engaging in personal control to reduce the likelihood of involvement in dating violence.

This document has been viewed 269 times.
School processes and teachers’ sense of collective efficacyAuthor(s): Ross, J., Hogaboam-Gray, A., Gray, P. (2004)
This research examines the effects of prior student achievement and school processes on collective teacher efficacy. In this study, collective teacher efficacy is defined in terms of teachers’ perception of their ability to improve student learning as an instructionally focused team within the school.

This document has been viewed 789 times.
School-Based Family Literacy Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Pelletier, J. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of school-based family literacy intervention programs:

It has long been known that what parents do in the home regarding language stimulation and literacy related activities can boost children’s language abilities and school literacy. Recent evidence has shown the power of intervention programs to help parents support their children’s developing literacy."

This document has been viewed 951 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

This document has been viewed 973 times.
Treatment of mental health disorders among children in child welfare careAuthor(s): Stewart, S., Leschie, A., den Dunnen, W., Zalmanowitz, S., Baiden, P. (2013)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

Many children and youth in the child welfare system are receiving
inadequate mental health treatment. Evidence suggests that comprehensive intervention efforts involving the child or youth, family, school, and community are required for improving behavioural functioning and placement stability.

This document has been viewed 439 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada?Author(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

This document has been viewed 1,123 times.