KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

A tale of two provinces: Who makes stronger vertical equity efforts?Author(s): Li, X. (2008)
The foundation allocation and three special allocations for disadvantaged students in grades 1 to 8 for 2006–2007 in Ontario with those in Alberta were compared to ascertain which funding formula was more equitable. The author is familiar with the Ontario funding formula. It was natural that Ontario was one of the two provinces being compared. Alberta was selected because it is more like Ontario with regard to education funding. Grades 1 to 8 were selected because the relevant information was available. In addition, there is a difference between Ontario and Alberta. Ontario funding for grades 1 to 8 is the same, but grades 9 to 12 receive more funds. Alberta funding for grades 1 to 9 is the same, but grades 10 to 12 receive more funds.

This document has been viewed 895 times.
After-school literacy activities and performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

This document has been viewed 1,119 times.
Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Parekh, G., Killoran, I. and Crawford, C. (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

This document has been viewed 1,053 times.
Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): Kim J. S. & Quinn, D. M. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from
low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures
of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

This document has been viewed 750 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,581 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,131 times.
Bullying, student-teacher relationships, and academic performanceAuthor(s): Konishi, C., Hymel, S., Zumbo, B., Li, Z. (2010)
Research conducted in Ontario schools has shown that large numbers of students experience violence and bullying in schools. Bullying has been found to have a negative impact on school performance and student development in general. This study looked at whether student’s academic performance is related to rates of bullying at school level, whether student-teacher connectedness has an impact on the bullying-achievement relationship and whether students who feel they have a positive relationship with their teachers perform well academically even if bullying happens at their school.

This document has been viewed 1,647 times.
Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for second language studentsAuthor(s): Cheng, L., Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2007)
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

This document has been viewed 1,272 times.
Critical Literacy Instruction and Primary StudentsAuthor(s): MacDonald, J., Halvorsen, M. and Wilcox, C. (2009)
This action research study examined the impact of critical literacy instruction on primary students’ ability to respond critically to text. Specifically, the researchers explored primary students’ understanding of voice (which character’s message is most prominently portrayed); voiceless (which character’s message is marginalized ); the voiceless perspective (what a character might say); and the author’s message (what meanings and values does the text convey).

This document has been viewed 1,061 times.
Ensuring Students with Learning Disabilities Have Proper Documentation as they Transition into Post-secondary InstitutionsAuthor(s): Harrison, A.G., Nichols, E., Larochette, A. (2008)
The Ontario Human Rights Code (1990) guarantees students diagnosed with a learning disability (LD) the right to accommodations that meet their academic needs at the post-secondary level (College and University). Not all students, however, arrive equipped with the necessary documentation to guarantee this support. This study investigated the quality of documentation presented by students entering post-secondary institutions in support of their LD and, in so doing, exposes current practices for identifying students (declaring students Exceptional) at the elementary and secondary levels.

This document has been viewed 1,079 times.
Equity measures compared between three provincesAuthor(s): Li, X. (2010)
This study compares the elementary education funding formula in Ontario, Alberta, and BC with a focus on
vertical equity from the students’ perspective. The similarities and differences, particularly the measures
related to assisting disadvantaged students, of the three formula are analyzed and their possible implications are explored. With increasingly diverse students in schools, it is important to understand how equity measures in provincial funding formula work to meet the needs of all students.

This document has been viewed 827 times.
Equity, Social Justice, and the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): James, C.E. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 1,447 times.
Examining Race Representation in an Ontario Secondary Social Science TextbookAuthor(s): Rezai-Rashti, G.M. and McCarthy, C. (2008)
This study investigates the representations of race, multiculturalism, and anti-racism in one secondary social sciences textbook used in Ontario schools. In particular, the researchers were interested in examining how Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents for social sciences were translated into supporting textbooks by publishers.

This document has been viewed 1,116 times.
Gender and Racial Advocacy Amongst Women AdministratorsAuthor(s): Wallace, J. (2007)
Drawing on data from two studies, the researcher explored equity policy development in Ontario and the cultural and racial advocacy practices of former female administrators in the province.

This document has been viewed 856 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,333 times.
How Are Sexual and Gender Identities Represented in an Ontario Science Text?Author(s): Bazzul, J., Sykes, H. (2011)
This study investigated gender and sexuality bias in one science text used in Ontario schools. In particular, the study was guided by two main research questions:

1. Does the text support the existence of alternative sexualities (Lesbian, gay, and bisexual, for example)?

2. Does the text promote fixed sex and gender identities only (omitting transgendered, transsexual, and intersexed identities, for example)?

This document has been viewed 1,287 times.
Inclusion in French classroomsAuthor(s): Arnett, K.
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

This document has been viewed 704 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,345 times.
Is Gender a Consideration in the Hiring and Rotation of Secondary School Principals?Author(s): Reynolds, C., White, R., Brayman, C. and Moore, S. (2008)
Government statistics from the early 2000s in Ontario, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia illustrate that the percentage of women secondary school principals has risen over the past thirty years. This study investigated whether gender is a factor in the hiring and rotation practices of school boards within these four provinces.

This document has been viewed 871 times.
Islamic Schooling in OntarioAuthor(s): Zine, J. (2004)
Four full-time Islamic schools are the focus of this study on alternative schooling. The objectives of this research were: to identify the role and function of Islamic schooling in a diasporic context; to understand the role of Islamic education in the development of Islamic identity; to examine the Islamization of knowledge and pedagogy in Islamic schools.

This research study also focused on the knowledge production of Islamically-centred education, the teaching strategies and ways of socialization and discipline. These areas are examined to understand the religious and spiritual traditions of Islam in schools.

This document has been viewed 827 times.
Monocultural to Multicultural: Parent PerceptionsAuthor(s): Levine-Rasky, C. (2009)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This research snapshot summarizes a study on parent perceptions on multiculturalism:

"Cynthia Levine-Rasky of Queen’s University conducted a study of one elementary public school where, as a result of an increase to the immigrant population in the elementary school’s catchment area, a significant shift from being predominantly white and middle class to a more diverse student body occurred."

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

This document has been viewed 1,359 times.
Perspectives on the Africentric school: Voices of black youthAuthor(s): Gordon, M. and Zinga, D. (2012)
In 2009 the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) opened the first black-focused or africentric school in Ontario. This study explored the opinions of black youth regarding the proposal of a black-focused school. Specifically the research aimed to explore black youths’ ideas about whether a black-focused school would address the issue of academic disengagement amongst black students.

This document has been viewed 599 times.
Poverty and Schooling: Where Mindset Meets PracticeAuthor(s): Ciuffetelli Parker, D. (2015)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary explores how schools can address the inequities often associated with poverty and schooling.

This document has been viewed 473 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 914 times.
Serving communities with high incidences of poverty: Success stories from Ontario elementary schoolsAuthor(s): Flessa, J. and Gallagher-McKay, K. and Ciuffetelli Parker, D. (2010)
Previous literature suggests that the effects of child poverty is a challenging issue for students, teachers, and school administrators (Bascia, 1996). In collaboration with the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario (ETFO), this study focused on the work of 11 Ontario elementary schools in order to understand “how schools can best work with students and communities affected by poverty” (p. 5).

This document has been viewed 980 times.
Social Justice as a Priority in New Teacher InductionAuthor(s): Pinto, L., Portelli, J., Rottmann, C. and Pashby, K. (2012)
This research study explored the degree to which social justice was prioritized by Ontario school administrators, as part of the New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP). This study aimed to understand the ways in which administrators influenced the social justice practices of beginning teachers.

This document has been viewed 545 times.
Successful practices for immigrant parent involvement: An Ontario perspectiveAuthor(s): Ladky, M, Stagg, S. (2007)
This study brings together the perspectives of 21 immigrant parents who speak eight different languages
and have been in Canada less than six years with those of 61 teachers and 32 principals who work in
schools with English as a second language (ESL) populations of 20% or greater who have been recognized
as successfully involving immigrant parents in their children's schooling.

This document has been viewed 1,308 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Parr, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

This document has been viewed 973 times.
Teacher Diversity in CanadaAuthor(s): Ryan, J., Pollock, K., Antonelli, F. (2010)
This summary was created by the CSSE's Canadian Journal of Education and is available on their website, along with other Knowledge Mobilization Snapshots, at http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/KMS.htm or via their homepage at www.cje-rce.ca.

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of teacher diversity in Canada:

"Canada’s population continues to become more racially diverse as current immigration and Canadian birth patterns change the face of the population. As the diversity of the general population has increased, so has the student population, particularly in the metropolitan areas. Despite this fact, the racialized teacher population has not kept pace with the racialized student and general population. In fact, it appears to be falling further and further behind."

This document has been viewed 1,063 times.
Teachers Identify Their Coping Strategies for the Perceived Stresses of Inclusive ClassroomsAuthor(s): Brackenreed, D. (2011)
Adjusting to the demands of inclusive classrooms can be a stressful experience for Ontario teachers (Leithwood, 2006). This study investigated the coping strategies used by teachers in Ontario to manage this stress.

This document has been viewed 971 times.
Teaching diverse books to a diverse student populationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

This document has been viewed 853 times.
Teaching English Language LearnersAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on teaching English Language Learners (ELL students):

This document has been viewed 974 times.
The Impact of Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” Program on Students’ Oral HealthAuthor(s): Muirhead, V. and Lawrence, H. (2011)
While many school-based oral health initiatives have targeted specific behaviors such as tooth brushing, this study examined the impact of the broader Ontario’s “Healthy Schools” initiative on the oral health of students. Launched in 2006, this program focuses on broader issues of health promotion including healthy eating, substance use, physical activity, and personal safety amongst others.

This document has been viewed 548 times.
What Factors Impact University Participation in Canada?Author(s): Christofides, L.N., Hoy, M. and Yang, L. (2009)
Increased enrolment in post-secondary education institutions is generally thought to have a positive impact on a country’s future prospects. This research investigates the factors that impact on a young adult’s decision to pursue post-secondary education and, specifically, the impact of tuition fees, family income, parental educational attainment, gender, and university premium (perceived return on investment) on university attendance.

This document has been viewed 1,123 times.
What shapes inner city education policy?Author(s): Gaskell, J., Levin, B., Pollock, K. (2007)
This research looks at the ways that urban school boards in Toronto and Winnipeg have attempted over the last thirty to forty years to address issues of poverty and diversity.

This document has been viewed 994 times.