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Developing Critical Literacy Skills: Exploring Masculine and Feminine Stereotypes in Children's LiteratureAuthor(s): Dionne, A. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children’s literature is an ideal resource for helping children develop critical literacy skills because it encompasses tales, poetry, novels, comic strips, documentaries and activity books for a diverse range of learners. Further...books for children of all ages are infused with the cultural values of society and contribute to the transmission of ideologies from one generation to the next. Given that equality of the sexes is one of the foundations of our democractic society, it is important to support students in developing their critical literacy skills by considering the values and ideologies inherent in the representations of femininity and masculinity in books written for children. Children’s books mirror the values and images transmitted to children by adults. They act as vehicles for passing ideologies from generation to generation....By carefully examining collections of literature from various persepctives, researchers have been able to identify and describe the ideologies inherent in representations of gender."

This document has been viewed 1,688 times.
Improving Student Writing: Using Feedback as a Teaching ToolAuthor(s): Peterson, S. S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

Given that teachers spend a great deal of time providing written feedback to
students, it is important that the feedback have a greater influence on students’
writing development. Verbal or written feedback can be a powerful teaching tool
if it is given while students are in the process of writing drafts.....Focusing
on individual students’ immediate writing needs, this ongoing feedback is a form
of differentiated instruction that complements the teaching of mini-lessons to
small groups or to the whole class.

The teaching tools discussed [in this summary] support all students, Grades 4 to 12."

This document has been viewed 1,280 times.
Teaching diverse books to a diverse student populationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

This document has been viewed 853 times.