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A tale of two provinces: Who makes stronger vertical equity efforts?Author(s): Li, X. (2008)
The foundation allocation and three special allocations for disadvantaged students in grades 1 to 8 for 2006–2007 in Ontario with those in Alberta were compared to ascertain which funding formula was more equitable. The author is familiar with the Ontario funding formula. It was natural that Ontario was one of the two provinces being compared. Alberta was selected because it is more like Ontario with regard to education funding. Grades 1 to 8 were selected because the relevant information was available. In addition, there is a difference between Ontario and Alberta. Ontario funding for grades 1 to 8 is the same, but grades 9 to 12 receive more funds. Alberta funding for grades 1 to 9 is the same, but grades 10 to 12 receive more funds.

This document has been viewed 895 times.
Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Areepattamannil, S., Freeman, J. (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

This document has been viewed 1,025 times.
After-school literacy activities and performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

This document has been viewed 1,119 times.
Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for second language studentsAuthor(s): Cheng, L., Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2007)
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

This document has been viewed 1,272 times.
College MathematicsAuthor(s): Orpwood, G., Schollen, L. (2011)
The College Mathematics Project tracks first semester college mathematics achievement in all 24 colleges in Ontario, relating it to age, gender, and students secondary school mathematics backgrounds. It also promotes deliberations concerning ways to
increase student success in college mathematics.

This document has been viewed 1,004 times.
Cross-language activation of phonology in young bilingual readersAuthor(s): Jared, D., Cormier, P., Levy, B. and Wade-Woolley, L. (2012)
This study investigated the extent to which FI students whose first language is English identify and process words in both English and French during reading. Specifically the researchers explored whether students simultaneously learning two languages that share the same alphabet mentally store and retrieve words through a language specific system—French only or English only, or whether students posses a larger lexicon where their knowledge of both French and English words is invoked during the reading process.

This document has been viewed 559 times.
Early Identification and Intervention for At-Risk Readers in French ImmersionAuthor(s): Wise, N., Chen, X. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Children who experience difficulty in learning to read often remain poor readers
in later years. An unfortunate cycle ensues, in that the more frustration these
children experience, the more disinterested they become in reading. Abundant
evidence links early identification of reading problems to constructive interventions
and improved student achievement."

This document has been viewed 1,287 times.
Equity measures compared between three provincesAuthor(s): Li, X. (2010)
This study compares the elementary education funding formula in Ontario, Alberta, and BC with a focus on
vertical equity from the students’ perspective. The similarities and differences, particularly the measures
related to assisting disadvantaged students, of the three formula are analyzed and their possible implications are explored. With increasingly diverse students in schools, it is important to understand how equity measures in provincial funding formula work to meet the needs of all students.

This document has been viewed 827 times.
Experiences of Immigrant Students in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study investigated how immigrant students perceive the experience the study of French as a Second Official Language (FSOL) in Canada’s English- dominant elementary and secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 658 times.
Exploring the Use of Literature Across Elementary CurriculumAuthor(s): Pantaleo, S. (2002)
This study investigated the use of literature in elementary classrooms across subject areas. The researcher explored teacher and teacher-librarians’ use of different genres of literature including: realistic fiction (stories about everyday life), non-fiction, fantasy (science fiction, quest stories), poetry, traditional literature (myths, legends, folktales), and historical fiction. The researcher investigated the overall use of these genres by teachers and teacher-librarians and also the use of Canadian literature within each genre.

This document has been viewed 1,128 times.
Fostering Literacy Success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit StudentsAuthor(s): Toulouse, P.R. (2013)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Literacy success rates for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are currently measured by their acquisition of standard English and/or French, reflecting the languages of the Ontario curriculum. Because FNMI students often communicate in non-standard forms of English and/or French with their own unique nuances, they often encounter challenges in the standard languages. For these students, literacy success is cultivated by individualized programs that support their identity, experiences and relationships with the world. Literacy programs for these learners must, therefore, offer differentiated instruction, make real-life connections and involve strategies and resources that are engaging, motivating and culturally affirming.

This document has been viewed 1,151 times.
How Well Aligned Are Large-Scale Assessments and Report Card Grades?Author(s): Ross, J.A. & Gray, P. (2008)
The use of standardized external assessments as an indicator of student achievement has long been a controversial issue in most educational circles. This study compared students’ Education and Quality Assessment Office (EQAO) scores and their report card grades to determine whether students receive comparable ratings on the two assessments. Specifically, this study investigated the following research question: How well aligned are large-scale assessments and report-card grades?

This document has been viewed 1,135 times.
Improving Student Writing: Using Feedback as a Teaching ToolAuthor(s): Peterson, S. S. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

Given that teachers spend a great deal of time providing written feedback to
students, it is important that the feedback have a greater influence on students’
writing development. Verbal or written feedback can be a powerful teaching tool
if it is given while students are in the process of writing drafts.....Focusing
on individual students’ immediate writing needs, this ongoing feedback is a form
of differentiated instruction that complements the teaching of mini-lessons to
small groups or to the whole class.

The teaching tools discussed [in this summary] support all students, Grades 4 to 12."

This document has been viewed 1,278 times.
Poetry: A Powerful Medium for Literacy and Technology DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hughes, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of poetry and technology:

"Traditional notions of literacy were once related more or less exclusively to competence
in reading and writing. We have expanded these notions to include usage and
comprehension skills in speaking, listening, viewing, and representing – by which we
mean communicating through a variety of media, including visual art, drama, and
multimedia performances. In this context, our definition of literacy extends to
fluency in reading and creating electronic media. In a time when the focus is on
improving literacy, what role might poetry, a genre that is often marginalized in the
English language arts classroom, play in literacy development? How can poetry be
taught in ways that engage students, so that we can tap into its literacy-enhancing
power?"

This document has been viewed 1,135 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

This document has been viewed 1,077 times.
Storytelling and Story WritingAuthor(s): Campbell, T., Husek, M. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This snapshot summarizes research in the area of storytelling and story writing:

"By analyzing the written and spoken words of students in a Grade 4/5
class over a period of two months, we were able to explore the connections
between oral rehearsal – including storytelling – and story writing. We found
that the use of storytelling and peer talk stimulated significantly more writing
and higher-quality writing."

This document has been viewed 1,265 times.
Student Motivation to Learn Core FrenchAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2010)
This study investigated the motivation of students born in Canada (and whose first language was English) to learn French, compared with Allophone students (students whose first language was neither French nor English) and who were born outside of Canada. Specifically, this study compared the motivation of Allophones who began learning French in grade 9 after coming to Canada, to Canadian-born students who began learning French in grade 4.

This document has been viewed 899 times.
Successful practices for immigrant parent involvement: An Ontario perspectiveAuthor(s): Ladky, M, Stagg, S. (2007)
This study brings together the perspectives of 21 immigrant parents who speak eight different languages
and have been in Canada less than six years with those of 61 teachers and 32 principals who work in
schools with English as a second language (ESL) populations of 20% or greater who have been recognized
as successfully involving immigrant parents in their children's schooling.

This document has been viewed 1,308 times.
Teaching diverse books to a diverse student populationAuthor(s): Holloway, S., Greig, C. (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

This document has been viewed 853 times.
Teaching English Language LearnersAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on teaching English Language Learners (ELL students):

This document has been viewed 974 times.
The Inclusion of English Language Learners in French as a Second Language ClassroomsAuthor(s): Mady, C. (2012)
This study examined French as a Second Language teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about the inclusion of English Language Learner (ELL) students in French as an Official Second Language (FSOL) classes.

This document has been viewed 766 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 1,066 times.
Volunteer Youth Exchange Programs and Second Language LearningAuthor(s): Arnott, S. and Mady, C. (2012)
Second language exchange programs provide students with an opportunity to practice their language skills in an authentic setting. This study examined the impact of a Volunteer Youth Exchange (VYE) program on participants’ motivation to learn a second language (French or English).

Specifically, the researchers focused on the following two research questions: 1) How do the participants’ motivation to learn a second language (L2) and their self-assessment of their L2 compare pre and post volunteer experience?, and 2) What aspects of the volunteer experience may have influenced VYE participants’ willingness to communicate in their second language?

This document has been viewed 987 times.
Word Study Instruction: Enhancing Reading ComprehensionAuthor(s): Scott, R. M. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Word study instruction can provide students with vital knowledge which they can then apply to the task of comprehending text. The nature of word study will vary with the developmental needs of students and the demands of the text. A teacher’s knowledge of the structure of English is an important factor in optimizing word study instruction; equally vital is the ability to present the study of spelling, vocabulary and word choice in a manner that engages students and entices them to explore words on a deeper level."

This document has been viewed 1,170 times.