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Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Dr. John Ippolito
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,116 times.
Community Involvement in Educational PolicyAuthor(s): Sue Winton (2010)
People for Education (PFE) is a parent-led, not-for-profit organization in Ontario that encourages public citizens to become involved in education issues in their communities. This study examined data from a series of public focus groups hosted by People for Education from 2008 to 2010. Specifically, the researcher focussed on understanding the public’s vision for education in Ontario, and how community-based policy dialogues (conversations) can influence community engagement in educational policy.

This document has been viewed 862 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Xitao Fan; Michael Chen (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,013 times.
Effective Elements of Suicide Prevention programs in SchoolsAuthor(s): Balaguru, V; Sharma, J; Waheed, W
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2012 systematic review of effective elements of suicide prevention programs by Balaguru, Sharma and Waheed.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 236 times.
Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): John Cairney; Matthew Kwan; Scott Velduizen (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 964 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Shelley Stagg Peterson; Mary Ladky (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

This document has been viewed 885 times.
Helping children with their schooling: A comparison of parents of children with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Author(s): Rogers M.A.; Wiener, J.; Marton, I; Tannock, R.
It is often reported by teachers and parents that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have problems in school: they are less engaged, have lower grades, lower graduation rates and require more attention from teachers. Children with ADHD also have similar problems outside the classroom. These problems are not surprising because the symptoms associated with ADHD make learning more difficult. While there is research that describes how and why parents of children without ADHD are involved in their children’s learning, and that this involvement benefits the children, there is little information about parental involvement in the schooling of children with ADHD. This study explored parental involvement in the learning of students with ADHD.

This document has been viewed 1,209 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hayley A. Hamilton, Lysandra Marshall, Joanna A. Rummens, Haile Fenta, Laura Simich
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 932 times.
Math that feels good: A model for math education reformAuthor(s): Gadanidis, G., Borba, M., Hughes, J., Lacerda, H.D., Namukasa, I. (2016)
This summary was prepared by George Gadanidis, Janette Hughes and Immaculate Namukasa who are co-investigators on a 2016-2019 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Grant on Aesthetic Experiences for Young Mathematicians & their Teachers.

"Over the last ten years...we have been working in K-8 schools in Ontario and in Rio Claro, Brazil, designing experiences that offer students (and their teachers and parents) the pleasure of math surprise and insight. We have also been developing an effective model of math education reform that addresses teachers' interests and needs. Working with teachers we ask what they need help with in their math teaching. For example, when three grade 3 teachers in a school in Whitby told us they were looking for new ideas for teaching "area representations of fractions", we co-designed the activity below to (a) cover the grade 3 curriculum, but (b) also to offer a math surprise...."

This document has been viewed 1,157 times.
Neighbourhood connectedness can reduce teen drug useAuthor(s): Patricia G. Erickson, Edward M. Adlaf, Lana Harrison, Steven Cook, Marie- Marthe Cousineau (2012)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly
OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Collective Efficacy is a theory that has been shown to explain for patterns in youth crime at the neighbourhood and community level. It suggests that when parents are well connected to their children’s friends and the other people in the neighbourhood, and are willing to intervene for the common good, this decreases the likelihood of youth crime
occurring. This study tested to see if this theory could be applied to predict drug use among adolescents."

This document has been viewed 1,105 times.
Parent EngagementAuthor(s): Debbie Pushor
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of parent engagement:

"A wealth of research concludes that students are more likely to be successful when their parents are
engaged in their education....In light of this evidence, meaningful relationships that enhance parents’ opportunities to make important
contributions to student learning are vital to the work of teachers."

This document has been viewed 875 times.
Program In Brief: Empower Reading ProgramAuthor(s): E-BEST HWDSB
The Empower™ Reading program is designed to teach word identification skills and decoding strategies and to promote the effective use of these strategies. Applying these strategies effectively, the student can develop the basic skills needed for independent reading for meaning, information, or pleasure. The program focuses on 5 strategies: Sounding Out strategy, Rhyming strategy, Peeling Off strategy, Vowel Alert strategy, and SPY strategy, embedded in a metacognitive frame work.

This document has been viewed 2,382 times.
Program in Brief: Kindergarten Language and Literacy in the Classroom (KLLIC)Author(s): E-BEST, HWDSB (2011)
This summary was created by the E-Best team at the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board. This and other research summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

Kindergarten Language and Literacy in the Classroom (KLLIC) is 20
weeks in length, and is divided into 10 sections or cycles. The program was developed to help children in kindergarten learn
language skills that are the foundations for later literacy skills.

This document has been viewed 170 times.
Programs in Brief: Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)Author(s): The PALS program was developed by the Kennedy Centre for Human Development at Vanderbilt University.
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) program. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"PALS is a systematic class‐wide reading program for students in
kindergarten to grade 6. PALS builds reading fluency and
comprehension skills through a set of activities that students are
engaged in for 35 – 45 minute sessions, 3 – 4 times a week. The
classroom teacher provides the initial lesson followed by a
prescribed lesson with materials provided . This is followed by
students working in pairs to practice and reinforce the skills
taught."

This document has been viewed 1,574 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Ginette D. Roberge
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 810 times.
Secondary Students’ Attitudes Towards “Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS)Author(s): Robin H. Kay; Liesel Knaack (2009)
“Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS), “permit students to answer digitally-displayed multiple choice questions using a remote control” (Kay et al., 2009, p. 1). One of the suggested benefits of clickers (or ARS) is that they allows teachers to gauge in real-time whether students are grasping the content of a lesson, and make timely adjustments to their lesson when necessary. This study investigated student attitudes towards ARS in Ontario secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 955 times.
Serving communities with high incidences of poverty: Success stories from Ontario elementary schoolsAuthor(s): Joseph Flessa; Kelly Gallagher-McKay (2010)
Previous literature suggests that the effects of child poverty is a challenging issue for students, teachers, and school administrators (Bascia, 1996). In collaboration with the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario (ETFO), this study focused on the work of 11 Ontario elementary schools in order to understand “how schools can best work with students and communities affected by poverty” (p. 5).

This document has been viewed 957 times.
Supporting Families as Collaborators in Children's Literacy DevelopmentAuthor(s): Michelann Parr
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Many families are unaware of the valuable role they play in apprenticing their children into literacy. When asked what they do to support their children’s literacy development, they often think in terms of school-based tasks, rather than the things they do each day: singing a lullaby, playing card games, talking at the dinner table or checking email. Because there is no evident academic or school connection, families undervalue what they do that fosters literacy. It is essential, then, that educators help parents understand the important role they play in their children’s education.

This document has been viewed 909 times.
Teaching diverse books to a diverse student populationAuthor(s): Dr. Susan M. Holloway; Dr. Christopher J. Greig (2011)
Research shows that it is important for students to see themselves reflected in the curriculum in order for them to be engaged and successful in their learning. Although the student population in North America is increasingly diverse, there is little information available about whether or not the books students read in school reflect the diversity of the student population. The goal of this study was to explore which books English teachers choose to teach, why they choose them and what kinds of factors influence their actions and decisions both negatively and positively.

This document has been viewed 842 times.
Technology in the Mathematics ClassroomAuthor(s): Catherine Bruce (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of interactive whiteboards:

"Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are a relatively new learning tool. While some early studies suggest that they may only be a “slick presentation tool” used to enhance teacher-directed lessons, others have identified a greater potential. Research on use in mathematics classrooms suggests that when we combine thoughtful professional learning with implementation, we enable teachers to maximize the use of IWBs to enhance student learning through multi-modal representations and inquiry approaches."

This document has been viewed 2,097 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Guy Faulkner; Edward Adlaf; Hyacinth Irving; Kenneth Allison; John Dwyer (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 796 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Dr. David Hutchison
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,225 times.
Using Technology to Teach FractionsAuthor(s): Dr. John A Ross; Dr. Catherine D. Bruce (2009)
In North America, students have traditionally struggled to learn fractions. This is a critical issue as understanding fractions is an important aspect of everyday decision-making. Teachers have also struggled with teaching students the concepts behind fractions because of a lack of discipline knowledge and pedagogical content. This research introduced five sets of learning objects, called CLIPS, which were developed to assist teachers in teaching the concepts behind fractions.

This document has been viewed 2,037 times.