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Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): James Kim and David Quinn (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from
low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures
of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

This document has been viewed 708 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Wayne Martino (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,446 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Dr. John Ippolito
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,093 times.
Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

This document has been viewed 2,437 times.
Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Diane Lataille-Démoré
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

This document has been viewed 1,361 times.
Content LiteracyAuthor(s): Perry Klein (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Content literacy is the ability to read, write, create, interpret and present a
range of media, in subjects such as science, social studies and mathematics.
It includes the use of informational text, that is, print and electronic media
that present factual and conceptual content. Content literacy is essential for
success in both secondary and post-secondary education, where most of what
students read will be non-fiction. Fortunately, developing content literacy can
draw on students’ authentic interests in the world around them."

This document has been viewed 1,195 times.
Cultivating Student Engagement Through Interactive Art StrategiesAuthor(s): Christine Cho; John Vitale
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

While we know that engaged students are more invested in their learning, the arts remain an underutilized strategy for student engagement. The reality is that many teachers lack confidence teaching both visual arts and music. We feel strongly that the generalist teacher can develop a repertoire of strategies – such as those discussed here – to increase their confidence and provide authentic and sincere arts-based experiences for learners.

This document has been viewed 865 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Xitao Fan; Michael Chen (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 998 times.
Does School Size Affect Student Achievement?Author(s): Kerry Reimer Jones; Anthony N. Ezeife (2011)
There has been much debate about the impact of school characteristics (such as school and classroom size) on student achievement. This study investigated the relationship between the size of a school — how large a school is in terms of student enrollment — and the academic achievement of students within that school.

This document has been viewed 890 times.
Drawing on Children’s “Sense of Place” – The Starting Point for Teaching Social Studies and GeographyAuthor(s): David Hutchison
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Elementary school children now and then report that what they learn in school
sometimes seems disconnected from “real life” as they personally experience it
outside of school. Unfortunately, children tend to assume that subject learning that
doesn’t feel real to them isn’t real, or that its relevance ends when the school day is
over. This is a common problem in many subject areas, especially social studies and
geography. How can we make the study of “place” relevant and real to children?
Would the social studies curriculum be strengthened if it took account of the ways
in which children derive meaning and value from the real-life physical environments
that are familiar to them?"

This document has been viewed 1,267 times.
Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction and Depression Among AdolescentsAuthor(s): Gary Goldfield; Ceri Moore; Katherine Henderson; Annick Buchholz; Nicole Obeid; Martine Flament (2010)
This study investigated eating disorder behaviour, body dissatisfaction and symptoms of depression among Canadian adolescents.

This document has been viewed 845 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): R. E. Slavin; C. Lake (2007)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2007 systematic review of on different math programs available to elementary teachers by Slavin, R. E. , & Lake, C.

This document has been viewed 869 times.
Effective Reading Programs for All Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Chambers, B., Cheung, A., & Davis, S. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of elementary
reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that instructional process programs designed to change daily teaching practices had substantially greater research
support than programs that focused on curriculum or technology alone. "

This document has been viewed 1,365 times.
Effective Reading Programs for Struggling Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Davis, S., & Madden, N. A. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of remedial reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that the most effective strategy for remedial readers was an initial focus on improving classroom instruction methods, followed by one‐on‐one tutoring with an emphasis on phonics for students who continued to struggle."

This document has been viewed 1,780 times.
Equity, Social Justice, and the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): Carl E. James (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 1,352 times.
Exploring the Use of Literature Across Elementary CurriculumAuthor(s): Sylvia Pantaleo (2002)
This study investigated the use of literature in elementary classrooms across subject areas. The researcher explored teacher and teacher-librarians’ use of different genres of literature including: realistic fiction (stories about everyday life), non-fiction, fantasy (science fiction, quest stories), poetry, traditional literature (myths, legends, folktales), and historical fiction. The researcher investigated the overall use of these genres by teachers and teacher-librarians and also the use of Canadian literature within each genre.

This document has been viewed 1,049 times.
Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): John Cairney; Matthew Kwan; Scott Velduizen (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 943 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Robin Kay
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,245 times.
Handling Problematic Situations When Administering the EQAO AssessmentAuthor(s): Ruth Childs; Linda Umezawa (2009)
While instructions are provided to teachers on how to administer large-scale assessments, in some cases strict adherence to these instructions may prove to be problematic for teachers in their dual role as both test supervisor and teacher. This study investigated how grade 3 teachers expect to react when faced with problematic situations while administering the EQAO assessment to their own classroom students. Specifically, the researchers explored what these teachers said they would do when faced with a number of hypothetical situations, and why they would choose a certain course of action.

This document has been viewed 940 times.
How does social anxiety affect young children?Author(s): Murray Weeks; Robert J. Coplan; Adam Kingsbury
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

"A young child with anxiety symptoms may be at risk of experiencing anxiety in their adolescence and adulthood....This study examines the effects of subclinical social anxiety on early elementary school
children."

This document has been viewed 1,121 times.
How Well Aligned Are Large-Scale Assessments and Report Card Grades?Author(s): John Ross; Peter Gray (2008)
The use of standardized external assessments as an indicator of student achievement has long been a controversial issue in most educational circles. This study compared students’ Education and Quality Assessment Office (EQAO) scores and their report card grades to determine whether students receive comparable ratings on the two assessments. Specifically, this study investigated the following research question: How well aligned are large-scale assessments and report-card grades?

This document has been viewed 1,068 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hayley A. Hamilton, Lysandra Marshall, Joanna A. Rummens, Haile Fenta, Laura Simich
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 918 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Pamela Rose Toulouse
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,072 times.
Is It Beneficial for Students with Disabilities to Participate in the IPRC Process?Author(s): Elizabeth Savaria (2011)
This study investigated the extent to which young people with disabilities (in Ontario) participate in the process that results in their identification as an Exceptional student by an Individual Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), and how this participation impacts their self-concept.

This document has been viewed 971 times.
Is it Better to Have Generalist or Specialist Teachers Teach Physical Education in Elementary Schools?Author(s): Guy Faulkner; John Dwyer; Hyacinth Irving; Kenneth Allison, Edward Adlaf, Jack Goodman (2008)
This research investigated whether Physical Education (PE) specialist teachers delivered more PE lessons and provide increased opportunities for moderate and vigorous physical activity than generalist teachers. The researchers also examined whether specialist or generalist PE teachers had any impact on perceptions of Physical activity within the broader school, and whether either teacher had an impact on the engagement of students in extracurricular physical activities, such as intramural sports, offered within a school.

This document has been viewed 898 times.
Kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' literacy knowledge and parental involvementAuthor(s): Jacqueline Lynch (2010)
This study examined whether there were differences in kindergarten teachers' beliefs about students' print literacy
knowledge and about parental involvement in children's literacy events based on the socio-economic status (SES) of children's families.

This document has been viewed 924 times.
Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Elementary Schools Author(s): Dwyer, J., Kenneth, A., LeMoine, K., Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J., and Lysy, D. (2008)
The role of schools in providing opportunities for physical activity has become a topic of importance, as previous studies in Canada report both an increase in childhood obesity and a decrease in children’s daily physical activity. This study examines the physical activity programs offered in Ontario schools and the barriers that educators believe exist to providing these programs.

This document has been viewed 792 times.
Placing Music at the Centre of Literacy InstructionAuthor(s): Jonathan Boldu ; Carole Fleuret
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"This monograph begins with a survey of research which suggests that musical
activities promote the development of auditory perception and phonological
awareness as well as metacognitive and metalinguistic skills. It then presents
four pedagogical interventions. By way of conclusion, it reiterates the importance
of musical acitivities and music education in schools."


This document has been viewed 1,008 times.
Pre-service Teachers Knowledge About Ontario’s Large-scale AssessmentsAuthor(s): Ruth Childs; Alexandra Lawson (2003)
This study investigated pre-service teachers’ knowledge about Ontario’s large-scale assessments developed by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

This document has been viewed 968 times.
Programs in Brief: Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)Author(s): The PALS program was developed by the Kennedy Centre for Human Development at Vanderbilt University.
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) program. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"PALS is a systematic class‐wide reading program for students in
kindergarten to grade 6. PALS builds reading fluency and
comprehension skills through a set of activities that students are
engaged in for 35 – 45 minute sessions, 3 – 4 times a week. The
classroom teacher provides the initial lesson followed by a
prescribed lesson with materials provided . This is followed by
students working in pairs to practice and reinforce the skills
taught."

This document has been viewed 1,493 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Jim Cummins
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

This document has been viewed 998 times.
Psychological and educational interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescentsAuthor(s): Merry, S. N., Hetrick, S. E., Cox, G. R., Brudevold‐ Iverson, T., Bir, J. J., & McDowell, H. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on psychological and educational interventions. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether psychological and/or educational interventions are effective in preventing depression in children and adolescents....When compared with no intervention, programs showed an immediate reduction in risk of depression."

This document has been viewed 964 times.
School-Based Family Literacy Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Janette Pelletier
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of school-based family literacy intervention programs:

It has long been known that what parents do in the home regarding language stimulation and literacy related activities can boost children’s language abilities and school literacy. Recent evidence has shown the power of intervention programs to help parents support their children’s developing literacy."

This document has been viewed 912 times.
Science and Literacy in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Dr. Paul Elliott
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Language, both spoken and written, is central to exploring scientific phenomena, sharing and testing ideas and demonstrating understanding. Additionally, language use in the learning of science aids students’ development of literacy and associated cognitive skills. So, how can we embed the acquisition of literacy
skills in science and promote synergy between the teaching of science and literacy?"

This document has been viewed 874 times.
Supporting Aboriginal Educators in Pre-service Training Programs and in their Careers as TeachersAuthor(s): Julian Kitchen; Lorenzo Cherubini; Lyn Trudeau; Janie Hodson (2010)
This research explored the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers in both mainstream and native teacher education programs in Ontario. These early-career teachers from the Mohawk, Anishinabe and Métis groups reflected upon the challenges they encountered during their teacher preparation courses and first years of teaching. Specifically, this research identified the need to design current teacher education programs that value the individual and cultural identities of Aboriginal teacher candidates.

This document has been viewed 1,739 times.
Teachers' Evolving Mathematical UnderstandingsAuthor(s): Ann Kajander (2010)
This five year study examined preservice teacher understanding of elementary mathematics, as required for teaching.

This document has been viewed 1,125 times.
Teaching Mathematics For Social JusticeAuthor(s): Indigo Esmonde; Beverly Caswell (2010)
This study reports on a set of collaborative inquiry projects aimed at exploring teaching mathematics for social justice in one urban elementary school in Toronto.

This document has been viewed 856 times.
The Effectiveness of Literacy CoachesAuthor(s): Jacqueline Lynch; Steve Alsop
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy coaches:

"This article offers a review of studies on literacy coaches. It highlights the diversity
of roles that coaches play, the resulting improvements to student achievement, and
the implications this holds for teachers and principals working with coaches to
improve student learning in elementary schools."

This document has been viewed 1,054 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Robert Flynn; Robyn Marquis; Marie-Pierre Paquet; Lisa Peeke; Tim Aubry (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

This document has been viewed 1,031 times.
The Impact of Project Ploughshares Puppets for Peace Anti-Bullying ProgramAuthor(s): Tanya Beran; Bonnie Shapiro (2005)
This study investigated the effectiveness of one anti-bullying program, Project Ploughshares Puppets for Peace (Woodfine, Lubimiv, & Langlois, 1995), performed at over 100 elementary schools and community groups across Ontario. The program uses 3-foot tall, hand-androd puppets to enact a bully scenario intended to educate students about different types of bullying behaviors and strategies for conflict resolution.

This document has been viewed 972 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Yamina Bouchamma; Claire Lapointe (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 988 times.
The relationship between report cards and EQAO scores.Author(s): John Ross; Lynn Kostuch
This study examined the relationship between report card grades and student scores on the Educational Quality and Assessment Office (EQAO) tests in grades 3 and 6 for the 2007-2009 school years.
More specifically, this study was guided by three main research questions:
a) What is the level of agreement between report card grades and EQAO scores?
b) Do factors such as gender, subject area, student achievement, or grade level impact the level of agreement between these two indicators student achievement?
c) How well do report card grades predict the likelihood of success on the standardized assessments?

This document has been viewed 546 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Julie Corkett; Blaine Hatt; Tina Benevides (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

This document has been viewed 1,169 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Dr. David Hutchison
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

This document has been viewed 1,174 times.
Trigonometry in Grade 3?Author(s): George Gadanidis (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating rich math environments:

"Young students...benefit from opportunities for using imagination and sensing mathematical beauty. This monograph shares our research in this area, highlighting the ways we have engaged children
with ideas that are well beyond their grade level."

This document has been viewed 1,379 times.
Try Literacy Tutoring FirstAuthor(s): Deborah Berrill
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy tutoring:

"In everyday teaching practice, teachers are on the move, circulating to see who needs help and pausing to give individualized, focused support. Yet, some children need significantly more time than teachers with responsibilities to the whole class can provide. Teachers know who these children are and find various ways to support their learning, from pairing them with more able peers and structuring guided reading activities, to providing differentiated instruction with materials for different ability levels. However, some children need still more assistance, both in terms of the frequency and the duration of the support they require. What else can teachers do?"

This document has been viewed 951 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): Christina van Barneveld
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,427 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Catherine Cornford
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,091 times.