Search Results

Cross-language activation of phonology in young bilingual readersAuthor(s): Jared, D., Cormier, P., Levy, B. and Wade-Woolley, L. (2012)
This study investigated the extent to which FI students whose first language is English identify and process words in both English and French during reading. Specifically the researchers explored whether students simultaneously learning two languages that share the same alphabet mentally store and retrieve words through a language specific system—French only or English only, or whether students posses a larger lexicon where their knowledge of both French and English words is invoked during the reading process.

Viewed 596 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. & Ladky, M. (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

Viewed 943 times.
Promoting Literacy in Multilingual ContextsAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers can promote strong literacy development among English language
learners (ELL) by supporting students in relating their pre-existing knowledge to
new learning. For English language learners, the integration of new learning with
prior knowledge involves connecting what students know in their first language to
English. We must explore classroom strategies that have proven effective in helping
students transfer knowledge they have in their first language to English."

Viewed 1,218 times.
Successful practices for immigrant parent involvement: An Ontario perspectiveAuthor(s): Ladky, M, Stagg, S. (2007)
This study brings together the perspectives of 21 immigrant parents who speak eight different languages
and have been in Canada less than six years with those of 61 teachers and 32 principals who work in
schools with English as a second language (ESL) populations of 20% or greater who have been recognized
as successfully involving immigrant parents in their children's schooling.

Viewed 1,347 times.
Teaching English Language LearnersAuthor(s): Cummins, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO): http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on teaching English Language Learners (ELL students):

Viewed 1,025 times.
After-School Literacy Activities and Performance on the OSSLTAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2009)
Students in Ontario are required to take a number of provincial-wide large-scale tests before they graduate including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). If students do not pass the OSSLT (alternatively, students need to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)), they are not able to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and graduate from high school. Students who are new to Canada and use English as a second language and are developing English literacy (ESL/ELD) have a more difficult time with tests like the OSSLT. Also, it has been found that students who do reading and writing activities after school have better test scores. This study looks at the relationship between how well students did on the OSSLT and what kinds of reading and writing activities they did after school.

Viewed 1,292 times.
A Tale of Two Provinces: Who Makes Stronger Vertical Equity Efforts?Author(s): Li, X. (2008)
The foundation allocation and three special allocations for disadvantaged students in grades 1 to 8 for 2006–2007 in Ontario with those in Alberta were compared to ascertain which funding formula was more equitable. The author is familiar with the Ontario funding formula. It was natural that Ontario was one of the two provinces being compared. Alberta was selected because it is more like Ontario with regard to education funding. Grades 1 to 8 were selected because the relevant information was available. In addition, there is a difference between Ontario and Alberta. Ontario funding for grades 1 to 8 is the same, but grades 9 to 12 receive more funds. Alberta funding for grades 1 to 9 is the same, but grades 10 to 12 receive more funds.

Viewed 973 times.
Challenges with the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) for Second Language StudentsAuthor(s): Cheng, L., Klinger, D., Zheng, Y. (2007)
The purpose of this study was to see if there were any significant and systematic differences (based on success on different parts of the test) between ESL/ELD and non-ESL/ELD students that could help explain the higher failure rate of ESL/ELD students or provide ideas for what teachers and administrators could focus on when preparing ESL/ELD students for the OSSLT to increase their chances of success.

Viewed 1,352 times.