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Inclusion in French classroomsAuthor(s): Katy Arnett
This study endeavored to describe the ways in which a Grade 8 Core French teacher sought to support the diverse learning needs in one of her classes. Using classroom observations guided by an observation scheme and a series of teacher interviews, the study was able to describe the practices and principles which were featured in her teaching that existed
for the purpose of scaffolding support for her students.

This document has been viewed 656 times.
Promoting Curriculum Access in Children and Youth with Reading DisabiliitesAuthor(s): R. Martinussen
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 757 times.
Trigonometry in Grade 3?Author(s): George Gadanidis (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating rich math environments:

"Young students...benefit from opportunities for using imagination and sensing mathematical beauty. This monograph shares our research in this area, highlighting the ways we have engaged children
with ideas that are well beyond their grade level."

This document has been viewed 1,379 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Pamela Millett
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,182 times.