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Are Summer Reading Programs Effective for Low Income Students?Author(s): Kim J. S. & Quinn, D. M. (2013)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board. More E-Best summaries can be found at http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

A number of studies have shown that students from
low‐income families score significantly lower on most measures
of reading. Summer reading programs are often suggested as a strategy to reduce this gap. This meta-analysis reviewed studies that evaluated the effects of summer reading interventions.

This document has been viewed 753 times.
Black Canadian students' beliefs regarding education and academic achievementAuthor(s): Smith, A., Schneider, B., Ruck, M. (2005)
There are concerns about the educational outcomes of Black youth in North America. This research compared the academic and achievement-related beliefs of Black Canadian high school students in Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

This document has been viewed 1,108 times.
Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

This document has been viewed 1,429 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,133 times.
Bullying at school: Students report unsafe and high bullying areas within their schoolAuthor(s): Vaillancourt, T., Brittain, H., Bennett, L., Arnocky, S., McDougall, P., Hymel, S. Short, K., Sunderani, S. Scott, C. Mackenzie, M., Cunningham, L. (2010)
Bullying can cause a number of psychological and social issues in victims such as depression, poor self-image and greater dependency on adults. Bullying is common in elementary and secondary schooling and Canadian schools are no exception. Statistics show that more than one-third of Canadian students are either bullied, involved in bullying someone else, or both. Although there are a number of anti-bullying programs in effect in Canadian schools, reviews show that most have either shown no effect on reducing bullying rates, or in some cases, have actually caused harm. There is agreement that anti-bullying programs could be improved with increased adult supervision in certain areas (i.e. cafeteria, gym, etc.) where students are frequently bullied. This research surveyed elementary and secondary school students to identify such areas.

This document has been viewed 975 times.
Does School Size Affect Student Achievement?Author(s): Jones K.R. and Ezeife A.N. (2011)
There has been much debate about the impact of school characteristics (such as school and classroom size) on student achievement. This study investigated the relationship between the size of a school — how large a school is in terms of student enrollment — and the academic achievement of students within that school.

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Dropout Prevention and Intervention ProgramsAuthor(s): Wilson, S. J., Tanner‐Smith, E. E., Lipsey, M. W., Steinka‐Fry, K., & Morrison, J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of dropout prevention programs by Wilson, S. J., Tanner‐Smith, E. E., Lipsey, M. W., Steinka‐Fry, K., & Morrison.
http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 811 times.
Equity, Social Justice, and the Inclusive ClassroomAuthor(s): James, C.E. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This document has been viewed 1,450 times.
Helping children with their schooling: A comparison of parents of children with and without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Author(s): Rogers M.A., Wiener, J., Marton, I., Tannock, R. (2009)
It is often reported by teachers and parents that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have problems in school: they are less engaged, have lower grades, lower graduation rates and require more attention from teachers. Children with ADHD also have similar problems outside the classroom. These problems are not surprising because the symptoms associated with ADHD make learning more difficult. While there is research that describes how and why parents of children without ADHD are involved in their children’s learning, and that this involvement benefits the children, there is little information about parental involvement in the schooling of children with ADHD. This study explored parental involvement in the learning of students with ADHD.

This document has been viewed 1,224 times.
Morphology WorksAuthor(s): Kirby J.R and Bowers P.N. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of expanding students' vocabulary using morphology:

"What can classroom teachers do to develop word knowledge in children who need it most? Morphology describes how words are composed of meaningful parts....it also provides clues about how
words should be written and pronounced."

This document has been viewed 1,363 times.
Predicting Students' FuturesAuthor(s): Levin, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of predicting students' futures:

"Teachers often feel that they can predict students’ futures; that we can tell by, say, age 6 or 8
students’ academic destinies. This view is strengthened by studies that show a strong relationship
between various characteristics of students, such as their socio-economic status or their school
readiness, and their later achievement. In fact, predictions of this kind are fraught with problems....History is not destiny. We know that with the right supports, most people can achieve far more than anyone thought they could."

This document has been viewed 855 times.
Using Theatre to Examine Social Issues and Change School CultureAuthor(s): Gallagher, G. and Service, I. (2010)
This study examines the use of theatre to stimulate discussions about social issues and changes to school culture.The play tells the story of one boy’s struggle to overcome economic hardship, and the schools selected to show the play were chosen because of their large enrolments of students from low socio-economic backgrounds. The play was followed up with teacher professional development workshops to support the implementation of the overall program which was designed to help schools reduce the effects of poverty on students.

This document has been viewed 5,515 times.
What shapes inner city education policy?Author(s): Gaskell, J., Levin, B., Pollock, K. (2007)
This research looks at the ways that urban school boards in Toronto and Winnipeg have attempted over the last thirty to forty years to address issues of poverty and diversity.

This document has been viewed 997 times.