KNAER | RECRAE

Search Results

Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Gillian Parekh; Isabel Killoran; Cameron Crawford (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

This document has been viewed 1,014 times.
Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jessica Jones (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

This document has been viewed 1,131 times.
Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Philip Burge; Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz; Nancy Hutchinson; Hugh Box (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 992 times.
Supporting Students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): An Intervention ModelAuthor(s): Cheryl Missiuna; Nancy Pollock; Wenonah Campbell; Robin Gaines; Cindy DeCola; John Cairney; Dianne Russell; Elizabeth Molinaro; Sheila Bennett; Catherine Hecimovich (2012)
Many students in Ontario’s public schools receive occupational therapy services to meet a variety of needs. Often, this involves a qualified occupational therapist (OT) working one-on-one with a student within the school setting. Unfortunately, there are not enough OTs available to work with all of the students who need support, and students can wait between 1 to 2 years on a waitlist before receiving OT service (Deloitte & Touche, 2010).

Partnering for Change (P4C) is an innovative service delivery intervention model for students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).In the P4C intervention model, OTs work with classroom teachers and parents to build their capacity in supporting students’ occupational therapy needs. For example, OTs will coach parents and teachers to identify and implement strategies to improve students’ functioning at school.

This document has been viewed 994 times.