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Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Parekh, G., Killoran, I. and Crawford, C. (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

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Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jones, J., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Vilela, T. & Brown, H. (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

This document has been viewed 1,198 times.
Math Interventions for Students with Autistic Spectrum DisorderAuthor(s): King, S., Lemons, C., and Davidson, K. (2016)
This summary was developed by the E-Best team at the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board. This and other Research in Brief (RIB) summaries can be found at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/about/research

ASD can have varying effects on cognitive functioning. Those with high‐functioning ASD may not have difficulty with mathematics and numeracy, but can experience challenges in...

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Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Burge, P., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Hutchinson, N. and Box, H. (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 1,050 times.
Supporting Students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD): An Intervention ModelAuthor(s): Missiuna, C., Pollock, N., Campbell, W. N., Bennett, S., Hecimovich, C., Gaines, R., DeCola, C., Cairney, J., Russell, D and Molinaro, E. (2012)
Many students in Ontario’s public schools receive occupational therapy services to meet a variety of needs. Often, this involves a qualified occupational therapist (OT) working one-on-one with a student within the school setting. Unfortunately, there are not enough OTs available to work with all of the students who need support, and students can wait between 1 to 2 years on a waitlist before receiving OT service (Deloitte & Touche, 2010).

Partnering for Change (P4C) is an innovative service delivery intervention model for students with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).In the P4C intervention model, OTs work with classroom teachers and parents to build their capacity in supporting students’ occupational therapy needs. For example, OTs will coach parents and teachers to identify and implement strategies to improve students’ functioning at school.

This document has been viewed 1,104 times.