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Fostering Citizenship Engagement Through School ScienceAuthor(s): Sperling, E., & Bencze, L. (2010)
Recent curriculum revisions and policy documents in Ontario support a vision of science education with an increased emphasis on the relationship between science, technology, society, and the environment (STSE) (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2009). This study explored the relationship between STSE and citizenship education.

This document has been viewed 965 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Hyslop‐Margison, E. J., Pinto, L. (2007)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 885 times.
How Teacher-Educator’s Perceive Ontario’s New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP)Author(s): Barrett, S., Solomon, R. P., Mujiuwamariya, D., Portelli, J., Singer, J. (2009)
In 2006 Ontario’s Ministry of Education introduced the New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) to offer assistance to teachers during their first year of teaching.

This study investigated how teacher-educators (or professors at faculties of education across Ontario who teach pre-service teachers) perceive the impact of the NTIP on the experiences of pre-service teachers, new teachers, and K-12 students in Ontario. In particular, the study focussed on identifying any “hidden curriculum” that teacher-educators may perceive within NTIP.

This document has been viewed 889 times.
Integrated Curriculum: Increasing Relevance while Maintaining AccountabilityAuthor(s): Drake, S., Reid, J. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on integrated curriculum:

"In addition to literacy and numeracy, teachers need to address other initiatives such as environmental education, character education and the new literacies (media, critical and technological). With so many curriculum expectations to
cover and assess, it’s not surprising that teachers sometimes feel overwhelmed. How can teachers do it all? One way to address these multiple expectations is by integrating the curriculum. Integrated curriculum teaches core concepts and skills by connecting multiple subject areas to a unifying theme or issue."

This document has been viewed 1,313 times.
Parents' experiences seeking help for their children with mental health issuesAuthor(s): Reid, G., Cunningham, C., Tobon, J. and Evans, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

Having families involved with multiple mental health agencies can lead to greater system costs, increased burdens on families,
insufficient treatment, or unequal distribution of services. Administrators and policymakers may find this study interesting in order to re-evaluate the structure and service model of the mental health system.

This document has been viewed 568 times.
The Impact of Interdisciplinary Planning on Classroom Practice: Perceptions of Teachers and AdministratorsAuthor(s): Racknor, W. and Drake, S. (2011)
In 2008, the Bluewater District School Board in Ontario began to use interdisciplinary planning with junior kindergarten (JK) to grade 6 teachers, JK to grade 8 administrators, and teachers from two high schools. In this approach, teachers are intended to work in collaborative teams to develop interdisciplinary units based on provincial curriculum standards. The units developed by these teams are structured around “big ideas” such as change and interdependence and focused on developing higher order thinking skills such as problem solving, communication, and critical literacy.

This study investigated teacher and administrator perceptions of the impact of these new units on classroom practice.

This document has been viewed 672 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): van Barneveld, C. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,582 times.