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Are Courses and Programs Offered Equitably to Students Across a School Board?Author(s): Parekh, G., Killoran, I. and Crawford, C. (2011)
This study investigated whether programs within the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) — such as French immersion, Special Education, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP), and the Specialist High Skills Major Program (SHSMP) — were offered equitably to students in secondary schools throughout the TDSB.

This document has been viewed 1,037 times.
Cultural Connectedness and Identity Foster Resilience in FNMI YouthAuthor(s): Crooks, C., Burleigh, D. and Sisco, A. (2015)
This study explored the specific ways in which culturally relevant programming promotes resiliency in FNMI youth. Researchers found that...

This document has been viewed 138 times.
Effective Reading Programs for All Students in the Elementary GradesAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., Chambers, B., Cheung, A., & Davis, S. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on elementary reading programs. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review examined studies of elementary
reading programs and compared them to one another....Researchers found that instructional process programs designed to change daily teaching practices had substantially greater research
support than programs that focused on curriculum or technology alone. "

This document has been viewed 1,436 times.
Fostering Citizenship Engagement Through School ScienceAuthor(s): Sperling, E., & Bencze, L. (2010)
Recent curriculum revisions and policy documents in Ontario support a vision of science education with an increased emphasis on the relationship between science, technology, society, and the environment (STSE) (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2009). This study explored the relationship between STSE and citizenship education.

This document has been viewed 953 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Emery J. Hyslop‐Margison; Laura Pinto (2001)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 865 times.
How Teacher-Educator’s Perceive Ontario’s New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP)Author(s): Sarah Barrett; R. Patrick Solomon; Donatille Mujiuwamariya; John Portelli; Jordan Singer (2009)
In 2006 Ontario’s Ministry of Education introduced the New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) to offer assistance to teachers during their first year of teaching.

This study investigated how teacher-educators (or professors at faculties of education across Ontario who teach pre-service teachers) perceive the impact of the NTIP on the experiences of pre-service teachers, new teachers, and K-12 students in Ontario. In particular, the study focussed on identifying any “hidden curriculum” that teacher-educators may perceive within NTIP.

This document has been viewed 877 times.
Increasing peer resistance skills through a school-based interventionAuthor(s): Wolfe, D., Crooks, C., Chiodo, D., Hughes, R., Ellis, W. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The Fourth R is an evidence based intervention in schools that teaches youth how to have healthy relationships. Students who participate in the program learn strategies that can reduce their likelihood of engaging in peer pressure scenarios (when pressured to use drugs or alcohol, have unsafe sex, or witness peer violence perpetration at a higher rate).

This document has been viewed 238 times.
Mental health literacy curriculum in teacher preparation programs: Helping teacher candidates meet the mental health needs of studentsAuthor(s): Roger, S., Hibbert, K., Leschied, A., Pickel, L., Stepien, M., Atkins, M., Koenig, A., Woods, M., Vandermeer, M. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The concerns of education stakeholders about teachers’ mental health literacy mirror the lack of opportunities provided in their training. There is a need for a formal mental health literacy curriculum in teacher preparation programs.

This document has been viewed 270 times.
The Impact of Interdisciplinary Planning on Classroom Practice: Perceptions of Teachers and AdministratorsAuthor(s): Racknor, W. and Drake, S. (2011)
In 2008, the Bluewater District School Board in Ontario began to use interdisciplinary planning with junior kindergarten (JK) to grade 6 teachers, JK to grade 8 administrators, and teachers from two high schools. In this approach, teachers are intended to work in collaborative teams to develop interdisciplinary units based on provincial curriculum standards. The units developed by these teams are structured around “big ideas” such as change and interdependence and focused on developing higher order thinking skills such as problem solving, communication, and critical literacy.

This study investigated teacher and administrator perceptions of the impact of these new units on classroom practice.

This document has been viewed 663 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): Christina van Barneveld
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,501 times.
Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the CurriculumAuthor(s): Brett, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at:
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"While the Internet is now the number one information source for both children and adults, research is
showing that online reading does differ importantly from print-based reading (Coiro & Dobler, 2007;
Coiro, 2007)...."

This document has been viewed 1,181 times.
What ECE Teachers Think About Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood EducationAuthor(s): Wood, E., Specht, J., Willoughby, T. & Mueller, J. (2008)
This research study examined the perceptions of early childhood educators regarding integrating computer technology into pre-school classrooms. Specifically, this research focused on educators’ perceived advantages and disadvantages of such computer use and the barriers and supports that exist for pre-school educators in teaching computer technology curricula.

This document has been viewed 1,281 times.