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Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,566 times.
Critical Literacy Instruction and Primary StudentsAuthor(s): MacDonald, J., Halvorsen, M. and Wilcox, C. (2009)
This action research study examined the impact of critical literacy instruction on primary students’ ability to respond critically to text. Specifically, the researchers explored primary students’ understanding of voice (which character’s message is most prominently portrayed); voiceless (which character’s message is marginalized ); the voiceless perspective (what a character might say); and the author’s message (what meanings and values does the text convey).

This document has been viewed 1,052 times.
How is Literacy Portrayed in Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents?Author(s): Hyslop‐Margison, E. J., Pinto, L. (2007)
In this article, the researchers distinguish between two types of literacy: functional and critical literacy. While literacy can be understood as the skill of learning how to read and write in order to gain employment (functional literacy), another view is that literacy can empower and liberate students by promoting an understanding of societal power relations and encouraging students to challenge the inequities of current labour conditions (critical literacy). The purpose of this research was to examine the different ways in which the concept of literary is portrayed in educational policy documents related to secondary career education in Ontario.

This document has been viewed 882 times.
Promoting Critical Literacy across the Curriculum and Fostering Safer Learning EnvironmentsAuthor(s): Roberge, G.D. (2013).
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

In their everyday practice, teachers commonly encourage children to think deeply and critically examine what they read and view. Over the last decade, this practice has been augmented by increased emphasis on the teaching of critical thinking and critical literacy skills in Ontario schools. By teaching students to understand and embrace diverse viewpoints and to consider underlying messages, critical literacy may help foster another important provincial priority, that of creating safe and caring learning environments.

This document has been viewed 853 times.