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Combined Grade ClassroomsAuthor(s): Diane Lataille-Démoré
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Combined grades include children from two or more consecutive grades in one
classroom, with one teacher. This type of classroom is very common on both a
global and local scale – in Ontario, approximately 21 per cent of classes fall into
this category. Combined grades are generally found in school systems with specific
objectives for each grade level. For this reason, combined grades are different from
the multi-age model promoted in certain environments in the U.S. and Australia as a
way to focus instruction on individual development. The division in groups by age is,
historically, a rather recent phenomenon, dating back to the industrial revolution. In this monograph, the important question of how to optimize learning in a
combined grade class is addressed."

This document has been viewed 1,416 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin R. E. & Lake C. (2007)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2007 systematic review of on different math programs available to elementary teachers by Slavin, R. E. , & Lake, C.

This document has been viewed 887 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Middle and Secondary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin, R. E.; Lake, C.; Groff, C. (2009)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2009 systematic review of different math programs available to middle and secondary teachers by Slavin, R. E., Lake, C., & Groff, C.

This document has been viewed 883 times.
Teaching Elementary MathAuthor(s): Small, M. (2013)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

"Teaching through problem solving is about setting appropriate tasks, creating supportive environments and helping students to succeed without leading. Although some would argue that all mathematical tasks should be of this sort, others see it as one approach within a more varied menu. No matter the frequency of problem solving use, it is essential that students have opportunities to learn by thinking and doing and not by simply copying."

This document has been viewed 761 times.