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Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

This document has been viewed 2,579 times.
Effective Practices for Math Teaching in Elementary SchoolsAuthor(s): Slavin R. E. & Lake C. (2007)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2007 systematic review of on different math programs available to elementary teachers by Slavin, R. E. , & Lake, C.

This document has been viewed 887 times.
Factors the Influence the Classroom Management Style of New TeachersAuthor(s): Rideout, G. and Windle, S. (2010)
This study investigated whether any relationship exists between new teachers classroom management style and: (a) teachers’ own beliefs about education, (b) the mentorship teachers receive from
experienced colleagues, (c) teachers’ participation in the New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP), and (d) whether administrators at the school displayed a “transformational leadership” style.

This document has been viewed 754 times.
Managing Teacher-Student Relationships: A Minimalist ApproachAuthor(s): Christine Richmond
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on managing teacher-student relationships:

"Teachers can have two types of conversations with students in class. In the ideal situation the most potent
conversation is focused on learning, with minor support from the managing conversation. However, when
teachers experience lessons where conversation about managing dominates, the learning agenda can
disappear and poor outcomes are much more likely (Richmond, 2007)."

This document has been viewed 1,349 times.