Search Results

Bullying Predicts Dating Violence & Poor Relationship QualityAuthor(s): Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D. (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study showed that bullying predicts dating violence and poor relationship quality in adolescent dating relationships. These results illustrate how peer and dating relationship contexts are interconnected during adolescence. Youth who display aggression and other unhealthy behaviours in one type of relationship are likely to do so in others as well....

Viewed 367 times.
Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction and Depression Among AdolescentsAuthor(s): Goldfield, G.S., Moore, C., Henderson, K., Buchholz, A., Obeid, N. and Flament, M.F. (2010)
This study investigated eating disorder behaviour, body dissatisfaction and symptoms of depression among Canadian adolescents.

Viewed 918 times.
The Student FilmmakerAuthor(s): Hutchison, D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of digital video production:

"Increasingly, teachers are being asked to address an ever-broader notion
of literacy – one that includes new forms of digital literacy, related to the
multimedia technologies students routinely interact with (e.g., blogs, wikis
and social networking websites). Yet how can teachers integrate digital literacy
with the Ontario curriculum which underscores the importance of traditional
forms of print and oral literacy? Student-created videos are one possibility
that affords an opportunity to integrate print, oral, and digital literacies
into a compelling curriculum unit."

Viewed 1,436 times.
Gender Stereotypes and Musical InstrumentsAuthor(s): Buttu, S. (2008)
This study investigated the perceptions of girls enrolled in a single-sex school about gender stereotypes in relation to musical instruments. The research study focused on whether stereotypes impact girls’ decisions to play a certain instrument and how girls from an all girl school describe their experiences of playing their instruments in their own school and in co-educational environments such as band camp.

Viewed 932 times.
Islamic Schooling in OntarioAuthor(s): Zine, J. (2004)
Four full-time Islamic schools are the focus of this study on alternative schooling. The objectives of this research were: to identify the role and function of Islamic schooling in a diasporic context; to understand the role of Islamic education in the development of Islamic identity; to examine the Islamization of knowledge and pedagogy in Islamic schools.

This research study also focused on the knowledge production of Islamically-centred education, the teaching strategies and ways of socialization and discipline. These areas are examined to understand the religious and spiritual traditions of Islam in schools.

Viewed 864 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

Viewed 1,270 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

Viewed 1,270 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education, entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier, 1 at the moment when someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

Viewed 1,495 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However, the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

Viewed 1,788 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

Viewed 1,503 times.