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Adolescent Attitudes Towards SchizophreniaAuthor(s): Faulkner, G., Irving, H., Paglia-Boak, A., and Adalf, E. (2010)
This study investigated adolescent knowledge of schizophrenia and their attitudes towards persons with the disorder. This study aimed to understand the how knowledge about schizophrenia is associated with social distancing behavior (or behaving in a way to not wanting to associate with people with schizophrenia).

This document has been viewed 617 times.
Attitudes of Staff Working with People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Jones, J., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Vilela, T. & Brown, H. (2008)
This study investigated the attitudes of staff working in the field of Intellectual Disabilities. Specifically, this research explored whether staff working with people with Intellectual disabilities in a variety of community agencies supported a philosophy of inclusion. Furthermore, this research investigated whether or not differences in attitude about inclusion can be explained by demographic characteristics including: age, gender, and level of education.

This document has been viewed 1,191 times.
Fostering the Involvement of New Canadian ParentsAuthor(s): Peterson, S.S. & Ladky, M. (2007)
Previous research studies suggest that several barriers to new immigrant parent involvement in their children’s schooling can exist, including: language differences (Smrekar, 1996) and differences in cultural attitudes about the value of education and the role of parents in a child’s learning (Moles, 1993).

This particular study investigated the perspectives of elementary teachers and administrators across southern Ontario on effective practices to engage new immigrant parents in their child’s schooling.

This document has been viewed 897 times.
Gender Differences in Computer Attitudes, Ability, and Use in the Elementary ClassroomAuthor(s): Kay, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Computers are integrated into almost every major area of our lives: art, education,
entertainment, business, communication, culture, media, medicine, and
transportation. Many children start interacting with computers at three or four
years of age; gender-based socialization begins even earlier,1 at the moment when
someone asks, “Is it a boy or a girl?”. A critical question arises as to whether
computer behaviour is influenced by gender."

This document has been viewed 1,336 times.
Making Math Children Will LoveAuthor(s): Colgan, L. (2014)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html.

Evidence suggests that learning is energized by affect. We, as educators, must turn our attention to resources and strategies that improve students’ relationships with mathematics content and processes and pique students’ motivation, emotion, interest and attention.

This document has been viewed 827 times.
Poor peer & family relationships predict dating violence in adolescent girlsAuthor(s): Chiodo, D., Crooks, C.V., Wolfe, D.A., McIsaac, C., Hughs, R., and Jaffe, P.G. (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

The findings from this study underscore the importance of developing early prevention programming to enhance adolescent feelings of school connectedness, positive school attitudes, and engaging in personal control to reduce the likelihood of involvement in dating violence.

This document has been viewed 269 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of BullyingAuthor(s): Craig, K., Bell, D.& Leschied, A. (2011)
School-based bullying has increasingly attracted the attention of educational policy makers, parents, academics, and educators over the past decade. This study investigates pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, and attitudes about, school-based bullying. Specifically, this research investigates the impact of a pre-service teacher’s gender, prior experiences with different types of bullying, and the type of faculty of education program they are enrolled in (primary-junior, junior- intermediate, or intermediate-senior), on the likelihood that he/she will intervene in incidents of school-based bullying.

This document has been viewed 1,422 times.
Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of School Environments Before and After School PlacementsAuthor(s): Cherubini, L. (2008)
In the course of their formal training, pre-service teacher candidates are exposed to the concept of schools as a professional community of inquiry – that is, the idea that schools are environments where professionals come together to collaboratively improve the process of teaching and learning. While some researchers have investigated the experiences of new teachers in the professional environment of schools, there is comparatively less research into the experience of pre-service teachers.

This document has been viewed 789 times.
Public Perceptions of Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual DisabilitiesAuthor(s): Burge, P., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Hutchinson, N. and Box, H. (2008)
This study investigated public perceptions of the best education practices for students with intellectual disabilities. The potential obstacles and impacts of including students with intellectual disabilities in regular classrooms were also investigated.

This document has been viewed 1,045 times.
School-Based Interventions to Prevent or Reduce Teen Dating ViolenceAuthor(s): De La Rue, L., Polanin, J. R., Espelage, D. L., Pigott, T.D. (2016)
This research summary was developed by the Knowledge Network for Student Well-Being (KNSWB), outlining a meta-analysis that set out to determine the effects of middle and high school-based dating violence prevention programs on teens' knowledge of and attitudes toward dating violence, rape myths acceptance, dating violence perpetration, dating violence victimization, and conflict tactics. Implications and recommendations for school-based interventions are highlighted.

This document has been viewed 14 times.
Secondary Students’ Attitudes Towards “Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS)Author(s): Kay, R.H. and Knaack, L. (2009)
“Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS), “permit students to answer digitally-displayed multiple choice questions using a remote control” (Kay et al., 2009, p. 1). One of the suggested benefits of clickers (or ARS) is that they allows teachers to gauge in real-time whether students are grasping the content of a lesson, and make timely adjustments to their lesson when necessary. This study investigated student attitudes towards ARS in Ontario secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 963 times.
Teaching Science as a Process of InquiryAuthor(s): Melville W., Bartley A. & Fazio, X. (2012)
This study investigated the attitudes and experiences of pre-service secondary school science teachers who are learning to teach science as a process of inquiry. The pre-service teachers were enrolled in a full-year science methodology course at an Ontario faculty of education, which aimed to challenge the belief that scientific investigation is only conducted using one universal step-by-step process.


This document has been viewed 1,074 times.
What do teen immigrants say about drug addition?Author(s): Hamilton, H., Mann, R. and Noh, S. (2011)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can also be found at: www.eenet.ca

This study looks at what stigmas teens have against drug addiction and what factors lead to these attitudes. Educators may be interested in these findings because most drug prevention programs make use of stigmas and direct their anti-drug messages at young teens.

This document has been viewed 593 times.