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Academic Motivation of Immigrant and non-Immigrant AdolescentsAuthor(s): Areepattamannil, S., Freeman, J. (2008)
This research tried to better understand the academic achievements of immigrant adolescents in the GTA.

This document has been viewed 1,029 times.
Are Girls Really Better Readers?Author(s): White, B. (2007)
The reading gender gap between girls and boys is a common concern expressed in literature about literacy education - girls have consistently outperformed boys on recent large-scale reading assessments tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which girls are better readers than boys in Ontario, as determined by their results on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

This document has been viewed 1,292 times.
Assessing Students' Learning SkillsAuthor(s): Klinger, D., Miller, T., Shulha, L. (2006)
The Ontario education system requires teachers to assess students’ academic and non-academic achievements (learning skills) separately. These skills include: works independently, teamwork, organization, work habits, and initiative. This research surveyed Grade 9 mathematics teachers in Ontario on their assessment practices relating to learning skills.

This document has been viewed 1,127 times.
Black Canadian students' beliefs regarding education and academic achievementAuthor(s): Smith, A., Schneider, B., Ruck, M. (2005)
There are concerns about the educational outcomes of Black youth in North America. This research compared the academic and achievement-related beliefs of Black Canadian high school students in Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

This document has been viewed 1,108 times.
Bolstering Resilience in Students: Teachers as Protective FactorsAuthor(s): Hurlington, K. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of student resilience:

"Elementary teachers are well positioned to observe students who succeed despite overwhelming odds. It often appears that risk factors in the life of a child are insurmountable; yet, there are many who flourish amidst adversity. Early resiliency research focused on these seemingly anomalous youth, tracking their success into adulthood. Researchers were eager to determine what innate processes or capacities were helping these students to be successful in spite of the odds."

This document has been viewed 1,429 times.
Boys’ Underachievement: Which Boys Are We Talking About?Author(s): Martino, W. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Policy and research-based literature identifies boys’ underachievement, and
specifically their engagement with literacy, as both a Canadian and an
international problem. In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries, boys do not perform as well as girls on the
reading comprehension and writing components of literacy tests. However,
the Program for International Assessment (PISA) 2000 report on reading
performance explicitly states that “students from less favourable socioeconomic
backgrounds are on average less engaged in reading” (p. 8). Not
all boys are underachieving, nor are all girls out-performing boys; educators
and policy makers need to address the question of which boys require help
becoming literate and what kinds of help educators can provide."

This document has been viewed 1,583 times.
Bringing Marginalized Parents and Caregivers Into Their Children’s SchoolingAuthor(s): Ippolito, J. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on creating links between parents and schools and a list of strategies that can be used to build these relationships:

"Weak or non-existent lines of communication between homes and schools may create suspicion between teachers and parents and caregivers....[A] synthesis of the research on barriers to parental involvement provides useful insight. They identify four areas where barriers to parental involvement in education can emerge..."

This document has been viewed 1,133 times.
Bullying, student-teacher relationships, and academic performanceAuthor(s): Konishi, C., Hymel, S., Zumbo, B., Li, Z. (2010)
Research conducted in Ontario schools has shown that large numbers of students experience violence and bullying in schools. Bullying has been found to have a negative impact on school performance and student development in general. This study looked at whether student’s academic performance is related to rates of bullying at school level, whether student-teacher connectedness has an impact on the bullying-achievement relationship and whether students who feel they have a positive relationship with their teachers perform well academically even if bullying happens at their school.

This document has been viewed 1,647 times.
Classroom management practices to reduce disruptive or aggressive student behaviourAuthor(s): Oliver, R. M., Wehby, J. H., & Reschly, D. J. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on effective classroom management strategies. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether classroom management programs were effective in reducing
problematic behaviour in students from kindergarten through grade 12....It was found that classrooms that implemented classroom management programs had significantly lower rates of problem behaviour than classrooms not using classroom
management interventions."

This document has been viewed 2,691 times.
Does Parent Involvement Improve Student Success?Author(s): Fan, X. & Chen, M. (2001)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a Xitao Fan and Michael Chen's 2001 meta-analysis of parent involvement and student academic achievement. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,030 times.
Does School Size Affect Student Achievement?Author(s): Jones K.R. and Ezeife A.N. (2011)
There has been much debate about the impact of school characteristics (such as school and classroom size) on student achievement. This study investigated the relationship between the size of a school — how large a school is in terms of student enrollment — and the academic achievement of students within that school.

This document has been viewed 921 times.
Does School Size Matter?Author(s): Newman, M., Garrett, Z., Elbourne, D., Bradley, S., Noden, P., Taylor, J. & West, A. (2006)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2006 systematic review of research on school size and student achievement by M. Newman, Z. Garrett, D. Elbourne, S. Bradley, P. Noden, J.Taylor, and A. West. This and other summaries can also be found on the E-BEST website: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

This document has been viewed 1,126 times.
Forging Safer Learning Environments: Addressing Homophobic Bullying in SchoolsAuthor(s): Walton, G. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of bullying in schools:

"Issues concerning gender and sexuality are rich fodder for bullying. For students
who identify or are perceived as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT),
school can be especially harrowing, as these students are frequently targeted
for bullying."

This document has been viewed 1,240 times.
Formative Assessment to Support Student LearningAuthor(s): Suurtamm, C. (2010)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of formative assessment to support student learning:

"We now have compelling research indicating that formative assessment may be the most
significant single factor in raising the academic achievement of all students and especially that of
lower-achieving students. Every teacher needs to consider how the principles of formative
assessment can be applied in her or his work."

This document has been viewed 1,386 times.
How Well Aligned Are Large-Scale Assessments and Report Card Grades?Author(s): Ross, J.A. & Gray, P. (2008)
The use of standardized external assessments as an indicator of student achievement has long been a controversial issue in most educational circles. This study compared students’ Education and Quality Assessment Office (EQAO) scores and their report card grades to determine whether students receive comparable ratings on the two assessments. Specifically, this study investigated the following research question: How well aligned are large-scale assessments and report-card grades?

This document has been viewed 1,138 times.
Integrated Curriculum: Increasing Relevance while Maintaining AccountabilityAuthor(s): Drake, S., Reid, J. (2010)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research on integrated curriculum:

"In addition to literacy and numeracy, teachers need to address other initiatives such as environmental education, character education and the new literacies (media, critical and technological). With so many curriculum expectations to
cover and assess, it’s not surprising that teachers sometimes feel overwhelmed. How can teachers do it all? One way to address these multiple expectations is by integrating the curriculum. Integrated curriculum teaches core concepts and skills by connecting multiple subject areas to a unifying theme or issue."

This document has been viewed 1,314 times.
Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the ClassroomAuthor(s): Toulouse, P. R. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"A new body of research is beginning to demonstrate that Aboriginal students’
self-esteem is a key factor in their school success. An educational environment
that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is
critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s
contributions, innovations and inventions. Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. These strategies nurture the self-esteem – the positive interconnection between the physical, emotional-mental, intellectual and spiritual realms – of Aboriginal students."

This document has been viewed 2,359 times.
Learning Mathematics vs Following “Rules”: The Value of Student-Generated MethodsAuthor(s): Lawson, A. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"There has been a significant shift in the instruction of mathematics over the past
two decades. This shift has occurred in response to growing evidence that students
were learning how to apply mathematics rules without a real understanding of
the mathematics. A particularly disconcerting observation was that student
difficulties often stemmed from our longstanding traditional methods of
mathematics instruction."


This document has been viewed 2,061 times.
Managing Teacher-Student Relationships: A Minimalist ApproachAuthor(s): Richmond, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research on managing teacher-student relationships:

"Teachers can have two types of conversations with students in class. In the ideal situation the most potent
conversation is focused on learning, with minor support from the managing conversation. However, when
teachers experience lessons where conversation about managing dominates, the learning agenda can
disappear and poor outcomes are much more likely (Richmond, 2007)."

This document has been viewed 1,385 times.
Opportunities to Maximize Assessment to Support Student LearningAuthor(s): MacMath, S., Wallace, J., Chi, X. (2009)
This study investigated the way in which two individual teachers used a variety of assessment practices to track student learning during units that integrated different subject areas. The researchers looked at assessment as, for and of learning.

The purpose of this study was to investigate some of the strengths and challenges in using all three of these assessments and describe how these assessments were attempted during an integrated assignment.

This document has been viewed 1,224 times.
Predicting Students' FuturesAuthor(s): Levin, B. (2011)
This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO):
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx

This summary outlines research in the area of predicting students' futures:

"Teachers often feel that they can predict students’ futures; that we can tell by, say, age 6 or 8
students’ academic destinies. This view is strengthened by studies that show a strong relationship
between various characteristics of students, such as their socio-economic status or their school
readiness, and their later achievement. In fact, predictions of this kind are fraught with problems....History is not destiny. We know that with the right supports, most people can achieve far more than anyone thought they could."

This document has been viewed 855 times.
Programs in Brief: Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)Author(s): The PALS program was developed by the Kennedy Centre for Human Development at Vanderbilt University.
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on the Peer Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) program. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"PALS is a systematic class‐wide reading program for students in
kindergarten to grade 6. PALS builds reading fluency and
comprehension skills through a set of activities that students are
engaged in for 35 – 45 minute sessions, 3 – 4 times a week. The
classroom teacher provides the initial lesson followed by a
prescribed lesson with materials provided . This is followed by
students working in pairs to practice and reinforce the skills
taught."

This document has been viewed 1,680 times.
Secondary Students’ Attitudes Towards “Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS)Author(s): Kay, R.H. and Knaack, L. (2009)
“Clickers” or Audience Response Systems (ARS), “permit students to answer digitally-displayed multiple choice questions using a remote control” (Kay et al., 2009, p. 1). One of the suggested benefits of clickers (or ARS) is that they allows teachers to gauge in real-time whether students are grasping the content of a lesson, and make timely adjustments to their lesson when necessary. This study investigated student attitudes towards ARS in Ontario secondary schools.

This document has been viewed 963 times.
Single-Sex ClassroomsAuthor(s): Demers, S., Bennett, C. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"We hear more and more about single-sex classrooms. Traditionally, this mode of teaching was exclusively found in private schools; today, more and more single-sex classes are found in publicly funded schools in Canada and the United States. In the 1980s, single-sex classrooms were introduced in some Ontario schools to address perceived gaps in achievement of girls in mathematics. According to a recent Quebec study, in 2003–04 there were over 250 intervention projects to
improve boys’ learning. By far, the most common of these interventions was the single-sex classroom."

This document has been viewed 1,184 times.
Student Interaction in the Math Classroom: Stealing Ideas or Building UnderstandingAuthor(s): Bruce, C. D. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Research tells us that student interaction – through classroom discussion and other forms of interactive participation – is foundational to deep understanding and related student achievement. But implementing discussion in the mathematics classroom has been found to be challenging."

This document has been viewed 2,215 times.
Teachers’ Familiarity and Use of Formative Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student LearningAuthor(s): Volante, L. and Beckett, D. (2011)
In this study, the researchers investigated K-12 teachers’ familiarity with, and use of, formative assessment practices. The researchers also examined the factors that accounted for the under use of these
practices in Ontario classrooms.

This document has been viewed 1,087 times.
Technology in the Mathematics ClassroomAuthor(s): Bruce, C.D. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of interactive whiteboards:

"Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are a relatively new learning tool. While some early studies suggest that they may only be a “slick presentation tool” used to enhance teacher-directed lessons, others have identified a greater potential. Research on use in mathematics classrooms suggests that when we combine thoughtful professional learning with implementation, we enable teachers to maximize the use of IWBs to enhance student learning through multi-modal representations and inquiry approaches."

This document has been viewed 2,149 times.
The Educational Implications of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderAuthor(s): Tannock, R. (2007)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"Teachers should be aware that although there are many different perspectives on
ADHD, there is ample scientific evidence affirming its existence and its detrimental
impact on individuals. Classroom practices can make a difference for children with
ADHD."

This document has been viewed 2,583 times.
The Effect of School Leadership on Student AchievementAuthor(s): Ross, J., Gray, P. (2006)
This research study sought to evaluate the effects of principal leadership on student achievement. Ross and Gray (2006) re-analyzed results of data that had previously been reported
in other articles in order to test the influence of leadership, including
professional commitment and collective teacher efficacy, on student achievement.

This document has been viewed 1,122 times.
The Impact of Individualized Tutoring on Children in Foster CareAuthor(s): Flynn, R., Marquis, R., Paquet, M., Peeke, L. & Aubry, T. (2012)
This study investigates the impact of individualized tutoring on students’ academic achievement. Specifically, the researchers compared the reading and mathematics abilities (as indicated by test results) of 2 groups of primary school foster children. The first group of students included primary school foster children who received individualized tutoring in reading and mathematics throughout the school year, and the second group included children who did not receive this individualised tutoring.

This document has been viewed 1,113 times.
The Performance of French Speaking Minority StudentAuthor(s): Bouchamma, Y. and Lapointe, C. (2008)
Recent studies have raised concerns about the writing achievement of minority French-speaking students (students who attend school in provinces where the majority of the population speaks a language other than French) when compared with French-speaking and English speaking students who live in majority environments (in which the majority of the population speaks the same language as the student). This study examines the causes that students attribute to their writing successes and failures in minority and majority French-speaking Canadian provinces, including Ontario.

This document has been viewed 1,068 times.
The relationship between report cards and EQAO scores.Author(s): Ross, J. and Kostuch, L. (2011)
This study examined the relationship between report card grades and student scores on the Educational Quality and Assessment Office (EQAO) tests in grades 3 and 6 for the 2007-2009 school years.
More specifically, this study was guided by three main research questions:
a) What is the level of agreement between report card grades and EQAO scores?
b) Do factors such as gender, subject area, student achievement, or grade level impact the level of agreement between these two indicators student achievement?
c) How well do report card grades predict the likelihood of success on the standardized assessments?

This document has been viewed 566 times.
The Relationship Between Student Self-Efficacy and Ability in Reading and WritingAuthor(s): Corkett, J., Hatt, B., Benevides, T. (2011)
Bandura (1977) coined the term "self-efficacy", which can be understood as a person’s belief in his/her ability to do something. This research study explored the relationship between teacher and student self-efficacy and students’ actual ability in reading and writing as measured on a standardized test.

This document has been viewed 1,207 times.
Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and ListeningAuthor(s): Millett, P. (2009)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"The ability to hear, listen and process auditory information effectively is crucial
to learning for all students, and particularly challenging for students with hearing
loss. Internal and external classroom noise levels are often high: classrooms
with many hard, reflective surfaces (like concrete block walls) and few soft,
noise-absorbing surfaces (like carpet) cause this noise to be reflected and
amplified. While technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are
useful for students with hearing loss, addressing the problem of poor classroom
acoustics benefits not only these students, but also their classmates and teachers."

This document has been viewed 1,230 times.
Using Data to Improve Student AchievementAuthor(s): van Barneveld, C. (2008)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

"As lifelong learners, teachers recognize that their professional practice continues
to evolve as they reflect and act on new information.1 If teachers have information
that helps them confidently identify the root of educational challenges
and track progress, they can more readily develop action plans that will have a
positive impact on their students. All teachers share a common goal: to see every
student succeed. So, what are some effective ways to work with information to
improve student achievement?"

This document has been viewed 1,582 times.
Using Multilevel TextsAuthor(s): Cornford, C. (2012)
This summary was created by the What Works: Research into Practice program at the Ontario Ministry of Education
and can be accessed, along with other What Works summaries, on their website at:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/whatWorks.html

This summary provides an overview of research in the area of literacy and inclusive classrooms:

"There are multiple reasons for students’ lack of engagement with text, but one of the primary reasons is that the text is either too easy or too difficult....Multilevel texts allow students at all ability levels to engage in reading together. The use of multilevel texts accompanied by the differentiation of instruction and assessment promotes higher-level thinking through focused, whole-class discussions in which all students can participate"

This document has been viewed 1,214 times.
Using Technology to Teach FractionsAuthor(s): Ross, J., Bruce, C. (2009)
In North America, students have traditionally struggled to learn fractions. This is a critical issue as understanding fractions is an important aspect of everyday decision-making. Teachers have also struggled with teaching students the concepts behind fractions because of a lack of discipline knowledge and pedagogical content. This research introduced five sets of learning objects, called CLIPS, which were developed to assist teachers in teaching the concepts behind fractions.

This document has been viewed 2,129 times.