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Factors related to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents seeking mental health servicesAuthor(s): Dr. Shannon Stewart; Philip Baiden; Laura Theall-Honey (2014)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This study examined the frequency of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents with mental health needs and identified specific factors related to NSSI. Data on 2,013 adolescents were gathered from the Ontario Mental Health Reporting System using the Resident Assessment Instrument—Mental Health (RAI-MH). The researchers found increased NSSI in adolescents with mood or personality disorders, histories of abuse, substance use and intentional misuse of prescription medication, and higher rates of NSSI in females. The researchers highlighted the importance of novel findings in regards to intentional misuse of prescription medications in this population.

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Link between non-suicidal self-injury & suicidal behavioursAuthor(s): Dr. Chloe Hamza; Dr. Shannon Stewart; Dr. Teena Willoughby (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

NSSI and suicidal behaviours are different behaviours that often co-occur. Little attention has been given to why these behaviours are linked. Since NSSI is considered one of the most significant risk factor for suicidal behaviours, it is crucial to examine the mechanism through which this occurs. Three theories have been proposed to explain the link between NSSI and suicidal behaviours and, in this summary, an integrated model of these theories is introduced.

This document has been viewed 139 times.
School-based violence prevention program offers a protective impact for youth with maltreatment historiesAuthor(s): Dr. Claire Crooks; Dr. Katreena Scott; Dr. Wendy Ellis; Dr. David Wolfe (2011)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This research highlights the benefits of an inexpensive school-based violence prevention program. This program demonstrates support for the reduction of dating violence among students and the protective effect for maltreated youth, lowering their likelihood of engaging in violent delinquency. These results also suggest that a short-term violence prevention program can have significant and meaningful long-term results.

This document has been viewed 260 times.
Treatment of mental health disorders among children in child welfare careAuthor(s): Dr. Shannon Stewart; Dr. Alan Leschied; Wendy den Dunnen; Dr. Sharla Zalmanowitz, Dr. Sharla Zalmanowitz, Philip Baiden (2013)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

Many children and youth in the child welfare system are receiving inadequate mental health treatment. Evidence suggests that comprehensive intervention efforts involving the child or youth, family, school, and community are required for improving behavioural functioning and placement stability.

This document has been viewed 381 times.