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Factors That Impact Students’ Physical Activity LevelsAuthor(s): John Cairney; Matthew Kwan; Scott Velduizen (2012)
This study investigated students' experiences and perceptions of their school-based Physical Education (PE) classes in order to determine if those perceptions changed overtime during middle school. In particular, the researchers were interested in the relationship between students’ perceived athletic abilities, their enjoyment of their school-based PE classes, and gender.

This document has been viewed 945 times.
Factors that Influence the Physical Activity Levels of Youth in Urban and Rural SettingsAuthor(s): Constantinos Loucaides; Ronald Plotnikoff; Kim Bercovitz
This study investigated the difference in physical activity (PA) levels of urban and rural youth in Canada. Specifically, the researchers explored the psychological, demographic, behavioural, and social factors affecting the level of PA for Canadian youth in urban and rural settings.

This document has been viewed 711 times.
Physical Activity and Student AchievementAuthor(s): A. Fedewa; A. Soyeon
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines a 2011 systematic review of the link between physical activity and student achievement by Fedewa & Soyeon.

This document has been viewed 586 times.
Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Elementary Schools Author(s): Dwyer, J., Kenneth, A., LeMoine, K., Faulkner, G., Adlaf, E., Goodman, J., and Lysy, D. (2008)
The role of schools in providing opportunities for physical activity has become a topic of importance, as previous studies in Canada report both an increase in childhood obesity and a decrease in children’s daily physical activity. This study examines the physical activity programs offered in Ontario schools and the barriers that educators believe exist to providing these programs.

This document has been viewed 790 times.
Student Teacher Stress and Physical ActivityAuthor(s): Cameron Montgomery; Les MacFarlane; David Trumpower; Rebecca Lloyd (2012)
Student teachers (pre-service teachers who are completing teaching practicums within schools) can be under significant stress as they attempt to prove their skills and adapt to their supervisor’s style, all while undergoing constant evaluation. Some studies have suggested that these stressors may leave student teachers feeling burnt out before their career even begins. Recent studies have identified physical activity as a way to cope with stress, although research examining the relationship between student teacher stress and exercise has remain limited.

The purpose of this study was to identify the main sources of student teacher stress and investigate the relationship between levels of stress and participation in physical activity. Stress, for the purpose of this study, is defined as tension that arises when the demands of one’s surroundings exceeds one’s personal coping strategies.

This document has been viewed 976 times.
The Association Between Students’ Physical Activity Level and Their Sense of Connectedness with Their SchoolAuthor(s): Guy Faulkner; Edward Adlaf; Hyacinth Irving; Kenneth Allison; John Dwyer (2009)
School connectedness has been defined as a student’s belief “that adults in their school care about their learning and about them as individuals” (Blum & Libbey, 2004, p. 233). A greater sense of school connectedness has been linked to increased academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and a reduction in risky behaviors including substance and alcohol use and adolescent sexual activity.
This study investigated the factors that limit students’ sense of connectedness with their school and, specifically, the association between physical inactivity and school connectedness.


This document has been viewed 780 times.