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Addressing the gap between service need and delivery of child and youth mental health servicesAuthor(s): Dr. Vicki Schwean; Dr. Susan Rodger (2013)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This paper explored the need for ongoing innovation, development, and evaluation of public mental health policy related to child and youth mental health services. Authors proposed a vision in which demonstration and research sites partner with public health policy approaches and provide support through research and evidence informed practice.

This document has been viewed 190 times.
Critical role of schools in child & youth mental healthAuthor(s): Dr. Alan Leschied; Dr. Gordon Flett; Dr. Donald Saklofske (2012)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

Mental health problems are common yet unidentified among youth. Approximately one million youth in Canada will experience a diagnosable mental health disorder and only 4% of these youth will receive the necessary services.

This document has been viewed 393 times.
Immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment matter to children’s mental health and behaviourAuthor(s): Hayley A. Hamilton, Lysandra Marshall, Joanna A. Rummens, Haile Fenta, Laura Simich
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

"Previous studies have shown that children’s perceptions of their school environment are related to their academic outcomes and wellbeing. Less research has been focused on the importance of parents’ perceptions of school environment on child adjustment. Parental perception of school environment may be important for immigrants because schools are a central aspect of family adaptation. This study looks at the relationship between immigrant parents’ perceptions of school environment and the emotional and behavioural problems of their children."

This document has been viewed 919 times.
Psychological and educational interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescentsAuthor(s): Merry, S. N., Hetrick, S. E., Cox, G. R., Brudevold‐ Iverson, T., Bir, J. J., & McDowell, H. (2011)
This research snapshot was developed by the E-BEST team of Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and outlines research on psychological and educational interventions. This and other snapshots can be accessed directly from the E-Best website at: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/e-best/

"A recent systematic review sought to determine whether psychological and/or educational interventions are effective in preventing depression in children and adolescents....When compared with no intervention, programs showed an immediate reduction in risk of depression."

This document has been viewed 964 times.
School-based violence prevention program offers a protective impact for youth with maltreatment historiesAuthor(s): Dr. Claire Crooks; Dr. Katreena Scott; Dr. Wendy Ellis; Dr. David Wolfe (2011)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

This research highlights the benefits of an inexpensive school-based violence prevention program. This program demonstrates support for the reduction of dating violence among students and the protective effect for maltreated youth, lowering their likelihood of engaging in violent delinquency. These results also suggest that a short-term violence prevention program can have significant and meaningful long-term results.

This document has been viewed 264 times.
Treatment of mental health disorders among children in child welfare careAuthor(s): Dr. Shannon Stewart; Dr. Alan Leschied; Wendy den Dunnen; Dr. Sharla Zalmanowitz, Dr. Sharla Zalmanowitz, Philip Baiden (2013)
This summary was developed by Western’s Centre for School Mental Health. This and other research summaries can be found at www.edu.uwo.ca/csmh

Many children and youth in the child welfare system are receiving inadequate mental health treatment. Evidence suggests that comprehensive intervention efforts involving the child or youth, family, school, and community are required for improving behavioural functioning and placement stability.

This document has been viewed 382 times.
What parents expect from ED mental health services for youthAuthor(s): Paula Cloutier; Allison Kennedy; Heather Maysenhoelder; Elizabeth J. Glennie; Mario Cappelli; Clare Gray (2010)
This summary was created by the Evidence Exchange Network (EENet; formerly OMHAKEN). This and other summaries on mental health and addictions can be found at: www.eenet.ca

Many youth go to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a variety of mental health issues. A child’s parents or caregivers
are often a clinician’s main source of information about the youth, their history, and the crisis situation. In this way, caregivers’
perceptions can play a huge role in the way the clinician administers care for the youth. The caregiver also represents a second set of
expectations that need to be met. However, there is no standardized way of getting information from caregivers. This study
examines parental expectations for ED mental health services for youth.

This document has been viewed 873 times.